Quotes About Ancient Rome

Quotes tagged as "ancient-rome" (showing 1-30 of 80)
Winston S. Churchill
“How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries! Besides the fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog, there is this fearful fatalistic apathy. The effects are apparent in many countries. Improvident habits, slovenly systems of agriculture, sluggish methods of commerce, and insecurity of property exist wherever the followers of the Prophet rule or live. A degraded sensualism deprives this life of its grace and refinement; the next of its dignity and sanctity. The fact that in Mohammedan law every woman must belong to some man as his absolute property – either as a child, a wife, or a concubine – must delay the final extinction of slavery until the faith of Islam has ceased to be a great power among men. Thousands become the brave and loyal soldiers of the faith: all know how to die but the influence of the religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it. No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytizing faith. It has already spread throughout Central Africa, raising fearless warriors at every step; and were it not that Christianity is sheltered in the strong arms of science, the science against which it had vainly struggled, the civilisation of modern Europe might fall, as fell the civilisation of ancient Rome.”
Winston S. Churchill, The River War

Horace
“Ut haec ipsa qui non sentiat deorum vim habere is nihil omnino sensurus esse videatur."

If any man cannot feel the power of God when he looks upon the stars, then I doubt whether he is capable of any feeling at all.”
Horace

Titus Lucretius Carus
“A man leaves his great house because he's bored
With life at home, and suddenly returns,
Finding himself no happier abroad.
He rushes off to his villa driving like mad,
You'ld think he's going to a house on fire,
And yawns before he's put his foot inside,
Or falls asleep and seeks oblivion,
Or even rushes back to town again.
So each man flies from himself (vain hope, because
It clings to him the more closely against his will)
And hates himself because he is sick in mind
And does not know the cause of his disease.”
Titus Lucretius Carus

Stephanie Dray
“Selene’s life is a lesson to us that the trajectory of women’s equality hasn’t always been a forward march. In some ways the ancients were more advanced than we are today; there have been setbacks before and may be more in the future.”
Stephanie Dray, Lily of the Nile

Steven Saylor
“Men like Caesar and Pompey--they're not heroes, Meto. They're monsters. They call their greed and ambition "honour," and to satisfy their so-called honour they'll tear the world apart. But who am I to judge them? Every man does what he must, to protect his share of the world. What's the difference between killing whole villages and armies, and killing a single man? Caesar's reasons and mine are different only in degree. The consequences and the suffering still spread to the innocent (Gordianus the Finder to his son Meto)”
Steven Saylor, Rubicon

Christopher Hitchens
“The fervor and single-mindedness of this deification probably have no precedent in history. It's not like Duvalier or Assad passing the torch to the son and heir. It surpasses anything I have read about the Roman or Babylonian or even Pharaonic excesses. An estimated $2.68 billion was spent on ceremonies and monuments in the aftermath of Kim Il Sung's death. The concept is not that his son is his successor, but that his son is his reincarnation. North Korea has an equivalent of Mount Fuji—a mountain sacred to all Koreans. It's called Mount Paekdu, a beautiful peak with a deep blue lake, on the Chinese border. Here, according to the new mythology, Kim Jong Il was born on February 16, 1942. His birth was attended by a double rainbow and by songs of praise (in human voice) uttered by the local birds. In fact, in February 1942 his father and mother were hiding under Stalin's protection in the dank Russian city of Khabarovsk, but as with all miraculous births it's considered best not to allow the facts to get in the way of a good story.”
Christopher Hitchens, Love, Poverty, and War: Journeys and Essays

Robert   Harris
“Surely the greatest mercy granted us by Providence is our ignorance of the future. Imagine if we knew the outcome of our hopes and plans, or could see the manner in which we are doomed to die - how ruined our lives would be! Instead we live on dumbly from day to day as happily as animals. But all things must come to dust eventually. No human being, no system, no age is impervious to this law; everything beneath the stars will perish; the hardest rock will be worn away. Nothing endures but words.”
Robert Harris, Lustrum

Steven Saylor
“The strands (the gods) weave out of our mortal lives are like a pattern visible only from the heavens; we here on earth can only guess at their designs”
Steven Saylor, Last Seen in Massilia

Stephanie Dray
“I had come to Rome in chains, but I would leave Rome a queen.”
Stephanie Dray, Lily of the Nile

Steven Saylor
“I kept secrets from you. I let you believe a lie. I am an impious son. But I made my choice, as C(aesar) did, and once the Rubicon is crossed, there can be no turning back (Meto, Caesar's scribe, to his father Gordianus the Finder)”
Steven Saylor, Rubicon

Timberlake Wertenbaker
“The Greeks believed that it was a citizen's duty to watch a play. It was a kind of work in that it required attention, judgement, patience, all the social virtues."

"And the Greek were conquered by the more practical Romans, Arthur."

"Indeed, the Romans built their bridges, but they also spent many centuries wishing they were Greeks. And they, after all, were conquered by the barbarians, or by their own corrupt and small spirits.”
Timberlake Wertenbaker

Marcus Porcius Cato
“Carthago delenda est”
Marcus Porcius Cato

Robert   Harris
“Well, good luck to you both. Rome will be the winner whoever is the victor'. Cicero began to move away but then checked himself, and a slight frown crossed his face. He returned to Catulus. 'One more thing, if I may? Who proposed this widening of the franchise?' 'Caesar' Although Latin is a language rich in subtlety and metaphor, I cannot command the words, either in that tongue or even in Greek, to describe Cicero's expression at that moment. 'Dear gods' he said in a tone of utter shock. 'Is it possible he means to stand himself?' 'Of course not. That would be ridiculous. He's far too young. He's thirty-six. He's not yet even been elected praetor' 'Yes, but even so, in my opinion, you would be well advised to reconvene your college as quickly as possible and go back to the existing method of selection.' 'That is impossible' 'Why?' 'The bill to change the franchise was laid before the people this morning' 'By whom?' 'Labienus' 'Ah!' Cicero clapped his hand to his forehead.”
Robert Harris, Lustrum

Robert   Harris
“Ich stellte mir seine Gedanken als einen schnellen, schmalen Wasserstrom vor, der sich durch die Fugen eines gefliesten Bodens bewegte - erst vorwärts, dann nach links und rechts ausgreifend, an einem Punkt kurz innehaltend, in eine andere Richtung weiter vorstoßend, sich immer weiter ausbreitend und verzweigend und dabei in seiner schimmernden, flüssigen Bewegung all die kleinen Möglichkeiten, Kosequenzen und Wahrscheinlichkeiten bedenkend.”
Robert Harris, Imperium: A Novel of Ancient Rome

David Wishart
“These pastoral-poet guys with their bleating goats and oaten pipes can stuff their phalaecean hendecasyllabics where the sun don't shine.”
David Wishart, In at the Death

David Wishart
“...the guy might be a cold-blooded amoral sadistic killer and a cartload of tiles short of a watertight roof, but there was nothing wrong with his intelligence. [Caligula in Marcus Corvinus's eyes]”
David Wishart, Finished Business

David Wishart
“a poker-rectumed pillar of the establishment [Marcus Corvinus on a Roman Senator]”
David Wishart, Finished Business

“The failure of the roman system to furnish decent minimal standards for the mass of people was a fundamental cause of instability, both political and economic.”
H.J. Haskell, The New Deal in Old Rome: How Government in the Ancient World Tried to Deal with Modern Problems

David Wishart
“the emperor had chewed off his balls and stuffed a one-way ticket to the Black Sea up his rectum [Marcus Corvinus explains what happened to Ovid]”
David Wishart, Ovid

Katlyn Charlesworth
“In an empire as unruly as Rome, it is quite easy to get away with something as thespian as murder.”
Katlyn Charlesworth, While Rome Burned

Katlyn Charlesworth
“It was no wonder they thought us to be immortal––our nightly celebrations put Olympus to shame.”
Katlyn Charlesworth, While Rome Burned

Katlyn Charlesworth
“They say the eyes are the apertures to the soul. If that is so, I feared Locusta's soul was far darker than even Nero's.”
Katlyn Charlesworth, While Rome Burned

Katlyn Charlesworth
“The wheel of Rome spins constantly. Gods rise and fall, mortals live and die, and round and round we go. We all play a part in that wheel... And I make sure the wheel never stops spinning. You see, if the wheel stops, balance is lost.”
Katlyn Charlesworth, While Rome Burned

Katlyn Charlesworth
“They think they are invincible. But, the truth is, Nova––gods fall just as hard as mortals. The only difference is... gods do not see the fall coming until it is too late.”
Katlyn Charlesworth, While Rome Burned

Katlyn Charlesworth
“Even freed men will do what they must in Rome.”
Katlyn Charlesworth, While Rome Burned

Katlyn Charlesworth
“I at least know what I am and do not try to hide it from the rest of the world. Do you know what you are? Because you can only be one thing at a time.”
Katlyn Charlesworth, While Rome Burned

Katlyn Charlesworth
“Nothing makes sense in Rome.”
Katlyn Charlesworth, While Rome Burned

David Wishart
“My tongue tasted like a gladiator's jockstrap [Marcus Corvinus after a night out]”
David Wishart, Ovid

J. Paul Getty
“In my own opinion, the average American's cultural shortcomings can be likened to those of the educated barbarians of ancient Rome. These were barbarians who learned to speak--and often to read and write--Latin. They acquired Roman habits of dress and deportment. Many of them handily mastered Roman commercial, engineering and military techniques--but they remained barbarians nonetheless. They failed to develop any understanding, appreciation or love for the art and culture of the great civilization around them.”
J. Paul Getty, How to Be Rich

Morgan Llywelyn
“In the long run, the fall of one civilization is very much like the fall of another. Only the land remains.”
Morgan Llywelyn, After Rome: A Novel of Celtic Britain

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