Quotes About American

Quotes tagged as "american" (showing 31-60 of 208)
Mark Twain
“Tom said to himself that it was not such a hollow world, after all. He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it -- namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to attain.”
Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

John Steinbeck
“American cities are like badger holes, ringed with trash--all of them--surrounded by piles of wrecked and rusting automobiles, and almost smothered in rubbish. Everything we use comes in boxes, cartons, bins, the so-called packaging we love so much. The mountain of things we throw away are much greater than the things we use.”
John Steinbeck, Travels with Charley: In Search of America

Theodore Roosevelt
“Let the watchwords of all our people be the old familiar watchwords of honesty, decency, fair-dealing, and commonsense."... "We must treat each man on his worth and merits as a man. We must see that each is given a square deal, because he is entitled to no more and should receive no less.""The welfare of each of us is dependent fundamentally upon the welfare of all of us.”
Theodore Roosevelt

“America is a young dumb country and it needs all kinds of help. America is a dumb puppy with big teeth that bite and hurt. And we take care of America. We hold America to our bosom; we feed America, we make love to America. There wouldn't be an America if it wasn't for black people. So you have some dedicated black Americans who will die a million deaths to save America. And this is home for us. We don't know really about Africa. We talk it in a romantic sense, but America is it. And so, America is always going to be okay as long as black people don't totally lose their mind, cause we'll pick up the pieces and turn it into a new dance.”
Abiodun Oyewole

Anthony Burgess
“The 21st chapter gives the novel the quality of genuine fiction, an art founded on the principle that human beings change.

----- "A Clockwork Orange Resucked" intro to first full American version 1986”
Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange

Paul Krugman
“For most Americans, economic growth is a spectator sport.”
Paul Krugman

Jhumpa Lahiri
“...that in spite of living in a mansion an American is not above wearing a pair of secondhand pants, bought for fifty cents.”
Jhumpa Lahiri, The Namesake

An Na
“Your life can be different, Young Ju. Study and be strong. In America, women have choices.”
An Na, A Step from Heaven

Wynton Marsalis
“it ain't as hard as picking cotton”
Wynton Marsalis

Jefferson Davis
“The principle for which we contend is bound to reassert itself, though it may be at another time and in another form.”
Jefferson Davis

Herman Melville
“Call me Ishmael. Some years ago--never mind how long precisely--having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen and regulating the circulation. Whenever I find myself growing grim about the mouth; whenever it is a damp, drizzly November in my soul; whenever I find myself involuntarily pausing before coffin warehouses, and bringing up the rear of every funeral I meet; and especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the street, and methodically knocking people's hats off--then, I account it high time to get to sea as soon as I can. This is my substitute for pistol and ball. With a philosophical flourish Cato throws himself upon his sword; I quietly take to the ship. There is nothing surprising in this.
If they but knew it, almost all men in their degree, some time or other, cherish very nearly the same feelings towards the ocean with me.

There now is your insular city of the Manhattoes, belted round by wharves as Indian isles by coral reefs--commerce surrounds it with her surf. Right and left, the streets take you waterward. Its extreme downtown is the battery, where that noble mole is washed by waves, and cooled by breezes, which a few hours previous were out of sight of land. Look at the crowds of water-gazers there.

Circumambulate the city of a dreamy Sabbath afternoon. Go from Corlears Hook to Coenties Slip, and from thence, by Whitehall, northward. What do you see?--Posted like silent sentinels all around the town, stand thousands upon thousands of mortal men fixed in ocean reveries. Some leaning against the spiles; some seated upon the pier-heads; some looking over the bulwarks of ships from China; some high aloft in the rigging, as if striving to get a still better seaward peep. But these are all landsmen; of week days pent up in lath and plaster--tied to counters, nailed to benches, clinched to desks. How then is this? Are the green fields gone? What do they here?

But look! here come more crowds, pacing straight for the water, and seemingly bound for a dive. Strange! Nothing will content them but the extremest limit of the land; loitering under the shady lee of yonder warehouses will not suffice. No. They must get just as nigh the water as they possibly can without falling in. And there they stand--miles of them--leagues. Inlanders all, they come from lanes and alleys, streets and avenues--north, east, south, and west. Yet here they all unite. Tell me, does the magnetic virtue of the needles of the compasses of all those ships attract them thither?

Once more. Say you are in the country; in some high land of lakes. Take almost any path you please, and ten to one it carries you down in a dale, and leaves you there by a pool in the stream. There is magic in it. Let the most absent-minded of men be plunged in his deepest reveries--stand that man on his legs, set his feet a-going, and he will infallibly lead you to water, if water there be in all that region. Should you ever be athirst in the great American desert, try this experiment, if your caravan happen to be supplied with a metaphysical professor. Yes, as every one knows, meditation and water are wedded for ever.”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick or, The Whale

Scott Snyder
“That's what everyone thinks--they think being a cop is about punishing people for doing wrong. But that's not true. You know it isn't. It's about believing in people, believing in the good. In the will of people to do what's right despite their own instincts.”
Scott Snyder, American Vampire, Vol. 2

Lauren Willig
“They were a strange and mercantile people, these Americans. One never knew what they might come up with next.”
Lauren Willig, The Garden Intrigue

Jefferson Davis
“If the Confederacy falls, there should be written on its tombstone: Died of a theory.”
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, Volume 1

“It may be underfunded and at times mismanaged, but the [Endangered Species] Act is an unprecedented attempt to delegate human-caused extinction to the chapters of history we would rather not revisit: the Slave Trade, the Indian Removal Policy, the subjection of women, child labor, segregation. The Endangered Species Act is a zero-tolerance law: no new extinctions. It keeps eyes on the ground with legal backing-the gun may be in the holster most of the time, but its available if necessary to keep species from disappearing. I discovered in my travels that a law protecting all animals and plants, all of nature, might be as revolutionary-and as American-as the Declaration of Independence.”
Joe Roman, Listed: Dispatches from America's Endangered Species Act

“When the average American says, “I’m starving,” it is a prelude to a midnight raid on a well-stocked refrigerator or a sudden trip to the nearest fast food restaurant.”
Carolyn Custis James, The Gospel of Ruth: Loving God Enough to Break the Rules

Robert Barr
“Of all evil-doers, the American is most to be feared; he uses more ingenuity in the planning of his projects, and will take greater risks in carrying them out, than any other malefactor on earth.”
Robert Barr, The Mystery of the Five Hundred Diamonds

Roger Lowenstein
“Buffett's uncommon urge to chronicle made him a unique character in American life, not only a great capitalist but the Great Explainer of American capitalism. He taught a generation how to think about business, and he showed that securities were not just tokens like the Monopoly flatiron, and that investing need not be a game of chance. It was also a logical, commonsensical enterprise, like the tangible businesses beneath. He stripped Wall Street of its mystery and rejoined it to Main Street -- a mythical or disappearing place, perhaps, but one that is comprehensible to the ordinary American.”
Roger Lowenstein, Buffett: The Making of an American Capitalist

D.H. Lawrence
“In the depths of him, he too didn't want to go. But he was a born American, and if anything was on show, he had to see it. That was Life.”
D.H. Lawrence, The Plumed Serpent

Margaret Atwood
“Second-hand American was spreading over him in patches, like mange or lichen. He was infested, garbled, and I couldn't help him: it would take such time to heal, unearth him, scrape down to where he was true.”
Margaret Atwood, Surfacing

Patrick Henry
“I am not a Virginian, but an American.”
Patrick Henry

“Canada is the essence of not being. Not English, not American, it is the mathematic of not being. And a subtle flavour - we're more like celery as a flavour.”
Mike Myers

Alice Fulton
“While you’re alive there’s no time for minor amazements.”
Alice Fulton

Northrop Frye
“Americans like to make money; Canadians like to audit it. I know no other country where accountants have a higher social and moral status.”
Northrop Frye

“You can learn English online”
Brian Daniel

“There are many ways to honor America. This book is mine. I have completed this journey of self-education in the belief that the most terrifying possibility since 9/11 has not been terrorism--as frightening as that is--but the prospect that Americans will give up their rights in pursuing the chimera of security.”
David K. Shipler, Rights of the People, The: How Our Search for Safety Invades Our Liberties

J. Sheridan Le Fanu
“In my time first cousins did not meet like strangers. But we are learning modesty from the Americans, and old English ways are too gross for us.”
J. Sheridan Le Fanu, Uncle Silas

Virchand Gandhi
“...am so deeply impressed with the fair mindedness and tolerance of the American people...”
Virchand Gandhi

“The law is too important to be left to the lawyers, to paraphrase Georges Clemenceau about war and generals. We laymen know too little about our Constitution and think too superficially about its influence on the qualities of American life. Civic duty requires more.”
David K. Shipler, Rights of the People, The: How Our Search for Safety Invades Our Liberties

Firoozeh Dumas
“Despite a few exceptions, I have found that Americans are now far more willing to learn new names, just as they're far more willing to try new ethnic foods... It's like adding a few new spices to the kitchen pantry.”
Firoozeh Dumas, Funny in Farsi: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America

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