Quotes About Achilles

Quotes tagged as "achilles" (showing 1-30 of 49)
Madeline Miller
“I have done it," she says. At first I do not understand. But then I see the tomb, and the marks she has made on the stone. A C H I L L E S, it reads. And beside it, P A T R O C L U S.
"Go," she says. "He waits for you."

In the darkness, two shadows, reaching through the hopeless, heavy dusk. Their hands meet, and light spills in a flood like a hundred golden urns pouring out of the sun.”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Rick Riordan
“It will make you powerful. But it will also make you weak. Your prowess in combat will be beyond any mortal's, but your weaknesses, your failings will increase as well."

You mean I'll have a bad heel?" I said. "Couldn't I just, like, wear something besides sandals? No offense.”
Rick Riordan, The Last Olympian

Isaac Asimov
“Suppose that we are wise enough to learn and know—and yet not wise enough to control our learning and knowledge, so that we use it to destroy ourselves? Even if that is so, knowledge remains better than ignorance. It is better to know—even if the knowledge endures only for the moment that comes before destruction—than to gain eternal life at the price of a dull and swinish lack of comprehension of a universe that swirls unseen before us in all its wonder. That was the choice of Achilles, and it is mine, too.”
Isaac Asimov

Madeline Miller
“Patroclus, he says, Patroclus. Patroclus. Over and over until it is sound only.”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Madeline Miller
“We are all there, goddess and mortal and the boy who was both.”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Madeline Miller
“We reached for each other, and I thought of how many nights I had lain awake loving him in silence.”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Homer
“And overpowered by memory
Both men gave way to grief. Priam wept freely
For man - killing Hector, throbbing, crouching
Before Achilles' feet as Achilles wept himself,
Now for his father, now for Patroclus once again
And their sobbing rose and fell throughout the house.”
Homer, The Iliad

Madeline Miller
“Bury us, and mark our names above. Let us be free.”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Madeline Miller
“I conjure the boy I knew. Achilles, grinning as the figs blur in his hands. His green eyes laughing into mine. Catch, he says. Achilles, outlined against the sky, hanging from a branch over the river. The thick warmth of his sleepy breath against my ear. If you have to go, I will go with you. My fears forgotten in the golden harbor of his arms.
The memories come, and come. She listens, staring into the grain of the stone. We are all there, goddess and mortal and the boy who was both.”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Homer
“Why have you come to me here, dear heart, with all these instructions? I promise you I will do everything just as you ask. But come closer. Let us give in to grief, however briefly, in each other's arms.”
Homer, The Iliad

P.C. Cast
“Christ on a cracker. You raped Achilles!”
P.C. Cast, Warrior Rising

Madeline Miller
“This is what Achilles will feel like when he is old. And then I remembered: he will never be old.”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Madeline Miller
“I saw then how I had changed. I did not mind anymore that I lost when we raced and I lost when we swam out to the rocks and I lost when we tossed spears or skipped stones. For who can be ashamed to lose to such beauty? It was enough to watch him win, to see the soles of his feet flashing as they kicked up sand, or the rise and fall of his shoulders as he pulled through the salt. It was enough.”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Madeline Miller
“Perhaps he simply assumed: a bitterness of habit, of boy after boy trained for music and medicine, and unleashed for murder.”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Homer
“But you, Achilles,/ There is not a man in the world more blest than you--/ There never has been, never will be one./ Time was, when you were alive, we Argives/ honored you as a god, and now down here, I see/ You Lord it over the dead in all your power./ So grieve no more at dying, great Achilles.’

I reassured the ghost, but he broke out protesting,/ ‘No winning words about death to me, shining Odysseus!/ By god, I’d rather slave on earth for another man--/ Some dirt-poor tenant farmer who scrapes to keep alive—than rule down here over all the breathless dead.”
Homer

Madeline Miller
“The ship's boards were still sticky with new resin. We leaned over the railing to wave our last farewell, the sun-warm wood pressed against our bellies. The sailors heaved up the anchor, square and chalky with barnacles, and loosened the sails. Then they took their seats at the oars that fringed the boat like eyelashes, waiting for the count. The drums began to beat, and the oars lifted and fell, taking us to Troy.”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Madeline Miller
“Who was he if not destined for fame?”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Madeline Miller
“I think: this is what I will miss. I think: I will kill myself rather than miss it. I think: how long do we have?”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Madeline Miller
“This is how I think of us, when I remember our nights at Troy: Achilles and I beside each other, Phoinix smiling and Automedon stuttering through the punch lines of jokes, and Briseis with her secret eyes and quick, spilling laughter.”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Madeline Miller
“That is — your friend?"
"Philtatos," Achilles replied, sharply. Most beloved.”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

“We reached for each other and I thought of how many nights I had lain awake in this room loving him in silence.”
Madeline Miller The song of achilles

Ben Bova
“My first sight of the fabled warrior was a surprise. He was not a mighty-thewed giant, like Ajax. His body was not broad and powerful, as Odysseos'. He seemed small, almost boyish, his bare arms and legs slim and virtually hairless. His chin was shaved clean, and the ringlets of his long black hair were tied up in a silver chain. He wore a splendid white silk tunic, bordered with a purple key design, cinched at the waist with a belt of interlocking gold crescents... His face was the greatest shock. Ugly, almost to the point of being grotesque. Narrow beady eyes, lips curled in a perpetual snarl, a sharp hook of a nose, skin pocked and cratered... A small ugly boy born to be a king... A young man possessed with fire to silence the laughter, to stifle the taunting. His slim arms and legs were iron-hard, knotted with muscle. His dark eyes were absolutely humourless. There was no doubt in my mind that he could outfight Odysseos or even powerful Ajax on sheer willpower alone.”
Ben Bova

Thomas C. Foster
“The difference between being Achilles and almost being Achilles is the difference between living and dying.”
Thomas C. Foster, How to Read Literature Like a Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines

William Shakespeare
“One touch of nature makes the whole world kin,
That all with one consent praise new-born gauds,
Though they are made and moulded of things past,
And give to dust that is a little gilt
More laud than gilt o'er-dusted.
The present eye praises the present object.”
William Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida

Louise Glück
“The Triumph Of Achilles

In the story of Patroclus
no one survives, not even Achilles
who was nearly a god.
Patroclus resembled him; they wore
the same armor.

Always in these friendships
one serves the other, one is less than the other:
the hierarchy
is always apparent, though the legends
cannot be trusted--
their source is the survivor,
the one who has been abandoned.

What were the Greek ships on fire
compared to this loss?

In his tent, Achilles
grieved with his whole being
and the gods saw
he was a man already dead, a victim
of the part that loved,
the part that was mortal.”
Louise Glück

Madeline Miller
“He looked different in sleep, beautiful but cold as moonlight.”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Nel Noddings
“For Achilles, the death of Patroclus pushed him into a fury, but it was not only grief that drove him. It was also a sense of shame and guilt because he had not been there to protect his friend. Sometimes men in combat feel this sort of survivor’s guilt even though, realistically, they could have done nothing to prevent their comrade’s death.”
Nel Noddings, Peace Education: How We Come to Love and Hate War

Emma Winters
“- 'I've never had a thing for homicidal charmers before.'
- 'But now you do?'
- 'Apparently.' -I muttered, knowing he could feel my raicing heartbeat under his chest.
- 'Well, if it helps, I've never had a thing for beautiful, deceptively brave, innocent charmers before.'
- 'And now you do?'
His grin widened, taking on a wolfish look.
- 'Definitely”
Emma Winters, Equal Parts

Emma Winters
“Because you made me feel, Flick. Everyone is so predictable, but you? You showed up and rocked my world.”
Emma Winters, Equal Parts

Bernard Knox
“The same touchy sense of personal honor that is at the root of Achilles' wrath still governs relations between man and man in modern Greece; Greek society still fosters in the individual a fierce sense of his privileges, no matter how small, of his rights, no matter how confined, of his personal worth, no matter how low. And to defend it, he will stop, like Achilles, at nothing.”
Bernard Knox, The Oldest Dead White European Males & Other Reflections on the Classics

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