White Falcon > White's Quotes

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  • #1
    Alfred Bester
    “You pigs, you. You rut like pigs, is all. You got the most in you, and you use the least. You hear me, you? Got a million in you and spend pennies. Got a genius in you and think crazies. Got a heart in you and feel empties. All a you. Every you...'

    [...]

    Take a war to make you spend. Take a jam to make you think. Take a challenge to make you great. Rest of the time you sit around lazy, you. Pigs, you! All right, God damn you! I challenge you, me. Die or live and be great. Blow yourselves to Christ gone or come and find me, Gully Foyle, and I make you men. I make you great. I give you the stars.”
    Alfred Bester, The Stars My Destination


  • #2
    Alfred Bester
    “Faith in faith' he answered himself. 'It isn't necessary to have something to believe in. It's only necessary to believe that somewhere there's something worthy of belief.”
    Alfred Bester, The Stars My Destination


  • #3
    Orson Scott Card
    “In the moment when I truly understand my enemy, understand him well enough to defeat him, then in that very moment I also love him. I think it’s impossible to really understand somebody, what they want, what they believe, and not love them the way they love themselves. And then, in that very moment when I love them.... I destroy them.”
    Orson Scott Card, Ender's Game


  • #4
    Orson Scott Card
    “But when it comes to human beings, the only type of cause that matters is final cause, the purpose. What a person had in mind. Once you understand what people really want, you can't hate them anymore. You can fear them, but you can't hate them, because you can always find the same desires in your own heart.”
    Orson Scott Card, Speaker for the Dead


  • #5
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “As I approached my fiftieth birthday, I had become more and more enraged and mystified by the idiot decisions made by my countrymen. And then I had come suddenly to pity them, for I understood how innocent and natural it was for them to behave so abominably, and with such abominable results: They were doing their best to live like people invented in story books. This was the reason Americans shot each other so often: It was a convenient literary device for ending short stories and books.
    Why were so many Americans treated by their government as though their lives were as disposable as paper facial tis-sues? Because that was the way authors customarily treated bit-part players in their made-up tales.
    And so on.Once I understood what was making America such a dangerous, unhappy nation of people who had nothing to do with real life, I resolved to shun storytelling. I would write about life. Every person would be exactly as important as any other. All facts would also be given equal weightiness. Nothing would be left out. Let others bring order to chaos. I would bring chaos to order, instead, which I think I have done. If all writers would do that, then perhaps citizens not in the literary trades will understand that there is no order in the world around us, that we must adapt ourselves to the requirements of chaos instead. It is hard to adapt to chaos, but it can be done. I am living proof of that: It can be done.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Breakfast of Champions


  • #6
    Philip Pullman
    “We don’t need a list of rights and wrongs, tables of dos and don’ts: we need books, time, and silence. Thou shalt not is soon forgotten, but Once upon a time lasts forever.”
    Philip Pullman


  • #6
    Philip Pullman
    “I stopped believing there was a power of good and a power of evil that were outside us. And I came to believe that good and evil are names for what people do, not for what they are.”
    Philip Pullman, The Amber Spyglass


  • #7
    Ray Bradbury
    “Some people turn sad awfully young. No special reason, it seems, but they seem almost to be born that way. They bruise easier, tire faster, cry quicker, remember longer and, as I say, get sadder younger than anyone else in the world. I know, for I'm one of them.”
    Ray Bradbury, Dandelion Wine


  • #7
    Philip Pullman
    “When you look at what C.S. Lewis is saying, his message is so anti-life, so cruel, so unjust. The view that the Narnia books have for the material world is one of almost undisguised contempt. At one point, the old professor says, ‘It’s all in Plato’ — meaning that the physical world we see around us is the crude, shabby, imperfect, second-rate copy of something much better. I want to emphasize the simple physical truth of things, the absolute primacy of the material life, rather than the spiritual or the afterlife.

    [The New York Times interview, 2000]”
    Philip Pullman


  • #9
    Ray Bradbury
    “Learning to let go should be learned before learning to get. Life should be touched, not strangled. You’ve got to relax, let it happen at times, and at others move forward with it.”
    Ray Bradbury


  • #10
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “We are healthy only to the extent that our ideas are humane.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Breakfast of Champions


  • #11
    Charles Dickens
    “It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.”
    Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities


  • #13
    John Marsden
    “There are some things that once you've lost, you never get back. Innocence is one. Love is another. I guess childhood is a third.”
    John Marsden


  • #14
    Brian Jacques
    “I am that is, my sword shall wield for me.”
    Brian Jacques, Redwall


  • #15
    Bernard Beckett
    “I am not a machine. For what can a machine know of the smell of wet grass in the morning, or the sound of a crying baby? I am the feeling of the warm sun against my skin; I am the sensation of a cool wave breaking over me. I am the places I have never seen, yet imagine when my eyes are closed. I am the taste of another's breath, the color of her hair.
    You mock me for the shortness of my life span, but it is this very fear of dying which breathes life into me. I am the thinker who thinks of thought. I am curiosity, I am reason, I am love, and I am hatred. I am indifference. I am the son of a father, who in turn was a father’s son. I am the reason my mother laughed and the reason my mother cried. I am wonder and I am wondrous. Yes, the world may push your buttons as it passes through your circuitry. But the world does not pass through me. It lingers. I am in it and it is in me. I am the means by which the universe has come to know itself. I am the thing no machine can ever make. I am meaning.”
    Bernard Beckett, Genesis


  • #16
    Bernard Beckett
    “Which came first, the mind or the idea of the mind? Have you never wondered? They arrived together. The mind is an idea.”
    Bernard Beckett, Genesis


  • #17
    Bernard Beckett
    “The only thing binding individuals together is ideas. Ideas mutate and spread; they change their hosts as much as their hosts change them.”
    Bernard Beckett, Genesis


  • #18
    Bernard Beckett
    “The more the media peddled fear, the more the people lost the ability to believe in one another. For every new ill that befell them, the media created an explanation, and the explanation always had a face and a name. The people came to fear even their closest neighbors. At the level of the individual, the community, and the nation, people sought signs of others’ ill intentions; and everywhere they looked, they found them, for this is what looking does.”
    Bernard Beckett, Genesis


  • #19
    Bernard Beckett
    “The mind is not a machine, it is an idea. And the Idea resists all attempts to control it.”
    Bernard Beckett, Genesis


  • #20
    Jonathan Stroud
    “According to some, heroic deaths are admirable things. (Generally those who don't have to do it. Politicians and writers spring to mind.) I've never been convinced by this argument, mainly because, no matter how cool, stylish, composed, unflappable, manly, or defiant you are, at the end of the day you're also dead. Which is a little too permanent for my liking.”
    Jonathan Stroud, Ptolemy's Gate


  • #21
    Jonathan Stroud
    “One magician demanded I show him an image of the love of his life. I rustled up a mirror.”
    Jonathan Stroud, The Amulet of Samarkand


  • #22
    Jonathan Stroud
    “And then, as if written by the hand of a bad novelist, an incredible thing happened.”
    Jonathan Stroud, The Amulet of Samarkand


  • #23
    Cornelia Funke
    “Books have to be heavy because the whole world's inside them.”
    Cornelia Funke, Inkheart


  • #24
    Ernest J. Gaines
    “I want you to show them the difference between what they think you are and what you can be.”
    Ernest J. Gaines, A Lesson Before Dying


  • #25
    Daniel Quinn
    “You wouldn't know from experience that small children are the most powerful learning engines in the known universe.”
    Daniel Quinn, My Ishmael


  • #26
    Yann Martel
    “If we, citizens, do not support our artists, then we sacrifice our imagination on the altar of crude reality and we end up believing in nothing and having worthless dreams.”
    Yann Martel, Life of Pi


  • #27
    Patrick Ness
    “Stories are important...They can be more important than anything. If they carry the truth.”
    Patrick Ness, A Monster Calls


  • #28
    Isaac Asimov
    “The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom.”
    Isaac Asimov


  • #29
    Joseph Conrad
    “Droll thing life is -- that mysterious arrangement of merciless logic for a futile purpose. The most you can hope from it is some knowledge of yourself -- that comes too late -- a crop of inextinguishable regrets.”
    Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness and the Congo Diary


  • #30
    Joseph Conrad
    “We live as we dream--alone....”
    Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness and the Congo Diary




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