Yong Keat Teo > Yong Keat's Quotes

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  • #1
    Haruki Murakami
    “Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #2
    Haruki Murakami
    “The most important thing we learn at school is the fact that the most important things can't be learned at school.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #3
    Haruki Murakami
    “I've always done whatever I felt like doing in life. People may try to stop me, and convince me I'm wrong, but I won't change.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #4
    Haruki Murakami
    “People sometimes sneer at those who run every day, claiming they'll go to any length to live longer. But don't think that's the reason most people run. Most runners run not because they want to live longer, but because they want to live life to the fullest. If you're going to while away the years, it's far better to live them with clear goals and fully alive then in a fog, and I believe running helps you to do that. Exerting yourself to the fullest within your individual limits: that's the essence of running, and a metaphor for life — and for me, for writing as whole. I believe many runners would agree”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #5
    Haruki Murakami
    “In other words, let's face it: Life is basically unfair. But even in a situation that's unfair, I think it's possible to seek out a kind of fairness. Of course, that might take time and effort. And maybe it won't seem to be worth all that. It's up to each individual to decide whether or not it is.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #6
    Haruki Murakami
    “I'm often asked what I think about as I run. Usually the people who ask this have never run long distances themselves. I always ponder the question. What exactly do I think about when I'm running? I don't have a clue.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #7
    Haruki Murakami
    “In certain areas of my life, I actively seek out solitude. Especially for someone in my line of work, solitude is, more or less, an inevitable circumstance. Sometimes, however, this sense of isolation, like acid spilling out of a bottle, can unconsciously eat away at a person's heart and dissolve it. You could see it, too, as a kind of double-edged sword. It protects me, but at the same time steadily cuts away at me from the inside.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #8
    Haruki Murakami
    “All I do is keep on running in my own cozy, homemade void, my own nostalgic silence. And this is a pretty wonderful thing. No matter what anybody else says.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #9
    Haruki Murakami
    “At a certain point in our lives, when we really need a clear-cut solution, the person who knocks at our door is, more likely than not, a messenger bearing bad news. This isn’t always the case, but from experience I’d say the gloomy reports far outnumber the others. The messenger touches his hand to his cap and looks apologetic, but that does nothing to improve the contents of the message. It isn’t the messenger’s fault. No good to blame him, no good to grab him by the collar and shake him. The messenger is just conscientiously doing the job his boss assigned him. And this boss? That would be none other than our old friend Reality.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running
    tags: life


  • #10
    Haruki Murakami
    “Of course it was painful, and there were times when, emotionally, I just wanted to chuck it all. But pain seems to be a precondition for this kind of sport. If pain weren't involved, who in the world would ever go to the trouble of taking part in sports like the triathlon or the marathon, which demand such an investment of time and energy? It's precisely because of the pain, precisely because we want to overcome that pain, that we can get the feeling, through this process, of really being alive--or at least a partial sense of it. Your quality of experience is based not on standards such as time or ranking, but on finally awakening to an awareness of the fluidity within action itself.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #11
    Haruki Murakami
    “I’m the kind of person who likes to be by himself. To put a finer point on it, I’m the type of person who doesn’t find it painful to be alone. I find spending an hour or two every day running alone, not speaking to anyone, as well as four or five hours alone at my desk, to be neither difficult nor boring. I’ve had this tendency ever since I was young, when, given a choice, I much preferred reading books on my own or concentrating on listening to music over being with someone else. I could always think of things to do by myself.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #12
    Haruki Murakami
    “I am struck by how, except when you're young, you really need to prioritize in life, figuring out in what order you should divide up your time and energy. If you don't get that sort of system set by a certain age, you'll lack focus and your life will be out of balance.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #13
    Haruki Murakami
    “For me, running is both exercise and a metaphor. Running day after day, piling up the races, bit by bit I raise the bar, and by clearing each level I elevate myself. At least that’s why I’ve put in the effort day after day: to raise my own level. I’m no great runner, by any means. I’m at an ordinary – or perhaps more like mediocre – level. But that’s not the point. The point is whether or not I improved over yesterday. In long-distance running the only opponent you have to beat is yourself, the way you used to be.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #14
    Haruki Murakami
    “To keep on going, you have to keep up the rhythm.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #15
    Haruki Murakami
    “I don't think most people would like my personality. There might be a few--very few, I would imagine--who are impressed by it, but only rarely would anyone like it. Who in the world could possibly have warm feelings, or something like them, for a person who doesn't compromise, who instead, whenever a problem crops up, locks himself away alone in a closet? But is it ever possible for a professional writer to be liked by people? I have no idea. Maybe somewhere in the world it is. It's hard to generalize. For me, at least, I've written novels over many years, I just can't picture someone liking me on a personal level. Being disliked by someone, hated and despised, somehow seems more natural. Not that I'm relieved when that happens. Even I'm not happy when someone dislikes me.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #16
    Haruki Murakami
    “Being active every day makes it easier to hear that inner voice.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #17
    Haruki Murakami
    “It doesn’t matter how old I get, but as long as I continue to live I’ll always discover something new about myself.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #18
    Haruki Murakami
    “By then running had entered the realm of the metaphysical. First there came the action of running, and accompanying it there was this entity known as me. I run; therefore I am.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #19
    Haruki Murakami
    “But I didn't walk a single step. I stopped a lot to stretch, but I never walked. I didn't come here to walk. I came to run. That's the reason-the only reason-I flew all the way to the northern tip of Japan. No matter how slow I might run, I wasn't about to walk. That was the rule.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #20
    Haruki Murakami
    “You end up exhausted and spent, but later, in retrospect, you realize what it all was for. The parts fall into place, and you can see the whole picture and finally understand the role each individual part plays. The dawn comes, the sky grows light, and the colors and shapes of the roofs of houses, which you could only glimpse vaguely before, come into focus.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #21
    Haruki Murakami
    “It’s precisely because of the pain, the we can get the feeling, through this process, of really being alive—or at least a partial sense of it.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #22
    Haruki Murakami
    “I never could stand being forced to do something I didn't want to do at a time I didn't want to do it. Whenever I was able to do something I liked to do, though, when I wanted to do it, and the way I wanted to do it, I'd give it everything I had.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running


  • #23
    Haruki Murakami
    “If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.”
    Haruki Murakami, Norwegian Wood


  • #24
    Haruki Murakami
    “As I see it, you are living with something that you keep hidden deep inside. Something heavy. I felt it from the first time I met you. You have a strong gaze, as if you have made up your mind about something. To tell you the truth, I myself carry such things around inside. Heavy things. That is how I can see it in you.”
    Haruki Murakami, 1Q84


  • #25
    Haruki Murakami
    “It's just that you're about to do something out of the ordinary. And after you do something like that, the everyday look of things might seem to change a little. Things may look different to you than they did before. But don't let appearances fool you. There's always only one reality.”
    Haruki Murakami, 1Q84


  • #26
    Jon Krakauer
    “So many people live within unhappy circumstances and yet will not take the initiative to change their situation because they are conditioned to a life of security, conformity, and conservatism, all of which may appear to give one peace of mind, but in reality nothing is more dangerous to the adventurous spirit within a man than a secure future. The very basic core of a man’s living spirit is his passion for adventure. The joy of life comes from our encounters with new experiences, and hence there is no greater joy than to have an endlessly changing horizon, for each day to have a new and different sun.”
    Jon Krakauer, Into the Wild


  • #27
    Christopher McCandless
    “Two years he walks the earth. No phone, no pool, no pets, no cigarettes. Ultimate freedom. An extremist. An aesthetic voyager whose home is the road. Escaped from Atlanta. Thou shalt not return, 'cause "the West is the best." And now after two rambling years comes the final and greatest adventure. The climactic battle to kill the false being within and victoriously conclude the spiritual pilgrimage. Ten days and nights of freight trains and hitchhiking bring him to the Great White North. No longer to be poisoned by civilization he flees, and walks alone upon the land to become lost in the wild.

    --Alexander Supertramp, May 1992”
    Christopher McCandless


  • #28
    Haruki Murakami
    “I'm tired of living unable to love anyone. I don't have a single friend - not one. And, worst of all, I can't even love myself. Why is that? Why can't I love myself? It's because I can't love anyone else. A person learns how to love himself through the simple acts of loving and being loved by someone else. Do you understand what I am saying? A person who is incapable of loving another cannot properly love himself.”
    Haruki Murakami, 1Q84


  • #29
    Haruki Murakami
    “Most people are not looking for provable truths. As you said, truth is often accompanied by intense pain, and almost no one is looking for painful truths. What people need is beautiful, comforting stories that make them feel as if their lives have some meaning. Which is where religion comes from.”
    Haruki Murakami, 1Q84


  • #30
    Haruki Murakami
    “What’s most important is what you can’t see but can feel in your heart. To be able to grasp something of value, sometimes you have to perform seemingly inefficient acts. But even activities that appear fruitless don’t necessarily end up so. That’s the feeling I have, as someone who’s felt this, who’s experienced it.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running




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