Victoria Sparkman > Victoria's Quotes

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  • #1
    J.M. Barrie
    “The last thing he ever said to me was, 'Just always be waiting for me, and then some night you will hear me crowing.”
    J.M. Barrie

  • #2
    Neil Postman
    “We were keeping our eye on 1984. When the year came and the prophecy didn't, thoughtful Americans sang softly in praise of themselves. The roots of liberal democracy had held. Wherever else the terror had happened, we, at least, had not been visited by Orwellian nightmares.

    But we had forgotten that alongside Orwell's dark vision, there was another - slightly older, slightly less well known, equally chilling: Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Contrary to common belief even among the educated, Huxley and Orwell did not prophesy the same thing. Orwell warns that we will be overcome by an externally imposed oppression. But in Huxley's vision, no Big Brother is required to deprive people of their autonomy, maturity and history. As he saw it, people will come to love their oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their capacities to think.

    What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny "failed to take into account man's almost infinite appetite for distractions." In 1984, Orwell added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we desire will ruin us.

    This book is about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell, was right.”
    Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business

  • #3
    Neil Postman
    “When a population becomes distracted by trivia, when cultural life is redefined as a perpetual round of entertainments, when serious public conversation becomes a form of baby-talk, when, in short, a people become an audience, and their public business a vaudeville act, then a nation finds itself at risk; culture-death is a clear possibility.”
    Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business

  • #4
    Alan Moore
    “Behind this mask there is more than just flesh. Beneath this mask there is an idea... and ideas are bulletproof.”
    Alan Moore, V for Vendetta

  • #5
    Alan Moore
    “Everybody is special. Everybody. Everybody is a hero, a lover, a fool, a villain. Everybody. Everybody has their story to tell.”
    Alan Moore, V for Vendetta

  • #6
    Oscar Wilde
    “I am too fond of reading books to care to write them.”
    Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

  • #7
    Oscar Wilde
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.”
    Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

  • #8
    Alexandre Dumas
    “The difference between treason and patriotism is only a matter of dates.”
    Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo

  • #9
    Alexandre Dumas
    “I have always had more dread of a pen, a bottle of ink, and a sheet of paper than of a sword or pistol.”
    Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo

  • #10
    Alexandre Dumas
    “For all evils there are two remedies - time and silence.”
    Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo

  • #11
    Alexandre Dumas
    “Ah, lips that say one thing, while the heart thinks another,”
    Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo

  • #12
    Jane Austen
    “A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #13
    Jane Austen
    “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #14
    Charlotte Brontë
    “Do you think I am an automaton? — a machine without feelings? and can bear to have my morsel of bread snatched from my lips, and my drop of living water dashed from my cup? Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! — I have as much soul as you — and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me, as it is now for me to leave you. I am not talking to you now through the medium of custom, conventionalities, nor even of mortal flesh: it is my spirit that addresses your spirit; just as if both had passed through the grave, and we stood at God's feet, equal — as we are!”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

  • #15
    Charlotte Brontë
    “It is a long way to Ireland, Janet, and I am sorry to send my little friend on such weary travels: but if I can't do better, how is it to be helped? Are you anything akin to me, do you think, Jane?"

    I could risk no sort of answer by this time: my heart was still.

    "Because, he said, "I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you - especially when you are near me, as now: it is as if I had a string somewhere under my left ribs, tightly and inextricably knotted to a similar string situated in the corresponding quarter of your little frame. And if that boisterous channel, and two hundred miles or so of land some broad between us, I am afraid that cord of communion will be snapt; and then I've a nervous notion I should take to bleeding inwardly. As for you, - you'd forget me.”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

  • #16
    Arthur Conan Doyle
    “Education never ends, Watson. It is a series of lessons, with the greatest for the last.”
    Arthur Conan Doyle, His Last Bow: 8 Stories

  • #17
    George Bernard Shaw
    “I can't turn your soul on. Leave me those feelings; and you can take away the voice and the face. They are not you.”
    George Bernard Shaw, Pygmalion

  • #18
    George Bernard Shaw
    “What you are to do without me I cannot imagine.”
    George Bernard Shaw, Pygmalion

  • #19
    George Bernard Shaw
    “If you can’t appreciate what you’ve got, you’d better get what you can appreciate.”
    George Bernard Shaw, Pygmalion

  • #20
    George Bernard Shaw
    “Get out of my way; for I won't stop for you.”
    George Bernard Shaw, Pygmalion

  • #21
    J.K. Rowling
    “An Unbreakable Vow?" said Ron, looking stunned. "Nah, he can’t have.... Are you sure?"
    "Yes I’m sure," said Harry. "Why, what does it mean?"
    "Well, you can’t break an Unbreakable Vow..."
    "I’d worked that much out for myself, funnily enough.”
    J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

  • #22
    J.K. Rowling
    “He accused me of being Dumbledore's man through and through."
    "How very rude of him."
    "I told him I was."
    Dumbledore opened his mouth to speak and then closed it again. Fawkes the phoenix let out a low, soft, musical cry. To Harry's intense embarrassment, he suddenly realized that Dumbledore's bright blue eyes looked rather watery, and stared hastily at his own knee. When Dumbledore spoke, however, his voice was quite steady.
    "I am very touched, Harry.”
    J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

  • #23
    J.K. Rowling
    “I'm going to keep going until I succeed — or die. Don't think I don't know how this might end. I've known it for years.”
    J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

  • #24
    J.M. Barrie
    “To die will be an awfully big adventure.”
    J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan



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