Tommy Walker > Tommy's Quotes

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  • #1
    Oscar Wilde
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    Oscar Wilde

  • #2
    Mahatma Gandhi
    “Be the change that you wish to see in the world.”
    Mahatma Gandhi

  • #3
    Marcus Tullius Cicero
    “A room without books is like a body without a soul.”
    Marcus Tullius Cicero

  • #4
    “Insanity is doing the same thing, over and over again, but expecting different results.”
    Narcotics Anonymous

  • #5
    “It is better to remain silent at the risk of being thought a fool, than to talk and remove all doubt of it.”
    Maurice Switzer

  • #6
    Oscar Wilde
    “Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.”
    Oscar Wilde

  • #7
    Allen Saunders
    “Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans.”
    Allen Saunders

  • #8
    William Shakespeare
    “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.”
    William Shakespeare, As You Like It

  • #9
    Groucho Marx
    “Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.”
    Groucho Marx, The Essential Groucho: Writings For By And About Groucho Marx

  • #10
    Mark Twain
    “Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to reform (or pause and reflect).”
    Mark Twain

  • #11
    Elie Wiesel
    “The opposite of love is not hate, it's indifference. The opposite of art is not ugliness, it's indifference. The opposite of faith is not heresy, it's indifference. And the opposite of life is not death, it's indifference.”
    Elie Wiesel

  • #12
    Friedrich Nietzsche
    “That which does not kill us makes us stronger.”
    Friedrich Nietzsche

  • #13
    Gustave Flaubert
    “From time to time, I open a newspaper. Things seem to be proceeding at a dizzying rate. We are dancing not on the edge of a volcano, but on the wooden seat of a latrine, and it seems to me more than a touch rotten. Soon society will go plummeting down and drown in nineteen centuries of shit. There’ll be quite a lot of shouting. (1850)”
    Gustave Flaubert

  • #14
    Naomi Klein
    “A term like capitalism is incredibly slippery, because there's such a range of different kinds of market economies. Essentially, what we've been debating over—certainly since the Great Depression—is what percentage of a society should be left in the hands of a deregulated market system. And absolutely there are people that are at the far other end of the spectrum that want to communalize all property and abolish private property, but in general the debate is not between capitalism and not capitalism, it's between what parts of the economy are not suitable to being decided by the profit motive. And I guess that comes from being Canadian, in a way, because we have more parts of our society that we've made a social contract to say, 'That's not a good place to have the profit motive govern.' Whereas in the United States, that idea is kind of absent from the discussion. So even something like firefighting—it seems hard for people make an argument that maybe the profit motive isn't something we want in the firefighting sector, because you don't want a market for fire. ”
    Naomi Klein

  • #15
    R. Buckminster Fuller
    “Everyone is born a genius, but the process of living de-geniuses them.”
    R. Buckminster Fuller

  • #16
    Tommy  Walker
    “Television is the most insidious form of escape known to man. It is the leading medication in the production of catatonia, cutting attention spans down to nothing, and as result will gut the sales of this book. And nobody gives a rat's ass because everyone's catatonic.”
    Tommy Walker, Monstrous: The Autobiography of a Serial Killer But for the Grace of God

  • #17
    Tom Robbins
    “All depression has its roots in self-pity, and all self-pity is rooted in people taking themselves too seriously."

    At the time Switters had disputed her assertion. Even at seventeen, he was aware that depression could have chemical causes.

    "The key word here is roots," Maestra had countered. "The roots of depression. For most people, self-awareness and self-pity blossom simultaneously in early adolescence. It's about that time that we start viewing the world as something other than a whoop-de-doo playground, we start to experience personally how threatening it can e, how cruel and unjust. At the very moment when we become, for the first time, both introspective and socially conscientious, we receive the bad news that the world, by and large, doesn't give a rat's ass. Even an old tomato like me can recall how painful, scary, and disillusioning that realization was. So, there's a tendency, then, to slip into rage and self-pity, which if indulged, can fester into bouts of depression."

    "Yeah but Maestra - "

    "Don't interrupt. Now, unless someone stronger and wiser - a friend, a parent, a novelist, filmmaker, teacher, or musician - can josh us out of it, can elevate us and show us how petty and pompous and monumentally useless it is to take ourselves so seriously, then depression can become a habit, which, in tern, can produce a neurological imprint. Are you with me? Gradually, our brain chemistry becomes conditioned to react to negative stimuli in a particular, predictable way. One thing'll go wrong and it'll automatically switch on its blender and mix us that black cocktail, the ol' doomsday daiquiri, and before we know it, we're soused to the gills from the inside out. Once depression has become electrochemically integrated, it can be extremely difficult to philosophically or psychologically override it; by then it's playing by physical rules, a whole different ball game. That's why Switters my dearest, every time you've shown signs of feeling sorry for yourself, I've played my blues records really loud or read to you from The Horse's Mouth. And that's why when you've exhibited the slightest tendency toward self-importance, I've reminded you that you and me - you and I: excuse me - may be every bit as important as the President or the pope or the biggest prime-time icon in Hollywood, but none of us is much more than a pimple on the ass-end of creation, so let's not get carried away with ourselves. Preventive medicine, boy. It's preventive medicine."

    "But what about self-esteem?"

    "Heh! Self-esteem is for sissies. Accept that you're a pimple and try to keep a lively sense of humor about it. That way lies grace - and maybe even glory.”
    Tom Robbins, Fierce Invalids Home from Hot Climates

  • #18
    Tommy  Walker
    “When the hippie era ended and the hangover began, as idealism gives way to disillusionment, the hair of the marchers and street-dancers kept getting longer, and soon it began to tangle. Free love deteriorated into loveless promiscuity, our great electric Kool-Aid acid test churned out an entire generation of burnt-out old relics, and the hair, once a symbol of freedom, became symbolic of the new face of prison, a lawlessness which taken to its logical extreme would imprison all of society as our growing criminal element took to the streets.”
    Tommy Walker, Monstrous: The Autobiography of a Serial Killer But for the Grace of God

  • #19
    Maya Angelou
    “I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”
    Maya Angelou

  • #20
    Charles Bukowski
    “Do you hate people?”

    “I don't hate them...I just feel better when they're not around.”
    Charles Bukowski, Barfly

  • #21
    Tommy  Walker
    “Brrrrrr. Like a lady had handed me a pickle jar that I simply couldn't open, and I wasn't a man anymore.”
    Tommy Walker, Monstrous: The Autobiography of a Serial Killer But for the Grace of God

  • #22
    Charles Bukowski
    “The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are full of doubts, while the stupid ones are full of confidence.”
    Charles Bukowski

  • #23
    Charles Bukowski
    “There's nothing to mourn about death any more than there is to mourn about the growing of a flower. What is terrible is not death but the lives people live or don't live up until their death. They don't honor their own lives, they piss on their lives. They shit them away. Dumb fuckers. They concentrate too much on fucking, movies, money, family, fucking. Their minds are full of cotton. They swallow God without thinking, they swallow country without thinking. Soon they forget how to think, they let others think for them. Their brains are stuffed with cotton. They look ugly, they talk ugly, they walk ugly. Play them the great music of the centuries and they can't hear it. Most people's deaths are a sham. There's nothing left to die.”
    Charles Bukowski

  • #24
    Charles Bukowski
    “great writers are indecent people
    they live unfairly
    saving the best part for paper.

    good human beings save the world
    so that bastards like me can keep creating art,
    become immortal.
    if you read this after I am dead
    it means I made it.”
    Charles Bukowski, The People Look Like Flowers at Last

  • #25
    Charles Bukowski
    “if you get married they think you're
    finished
    and if you are without a woman they think you're
    incomplete.”
    Charles Bukowski

  • #26
    Charles Bukowski
    “writers are desperate people and when they stop being desperate they stop being writers.”
    Charles Bukowski

  • #27
    Tommy  Walker
    “Hers was an unconditional love– so long as you kept the food coming. Realizing that what attracted her to me needn’t have been anything more complicated than my having a warm body to nestle in and plentiful food in her bowl, still I felt that she loved me because at least a warm body was something I was already. Being loved for something I already was, no matter how surface oriented, was still better than being loved for the person I might be changed or mistakenly perceived to be.”
    Tommy Walker, Monstrous: The Autobiography of a Serial Killer But for the Grace of God
    tags: cats

  • #28
    Tommy  Walker
    “When hurtled into a crisis situation, all creatures great and small will fight for survival. But they live in a fight to be free. A vegetative life of status quo is not going to be enough. So what then to do with this freedom? Really the only thing one can do is go to the light, as our moth friends will do. The freedom to seek possibilities. Following the chain to its source, this is the basic reason that life itself will kill you, because life leads to freedom and freedom leads back to the incinerating light from where your life first came.”
    Tommy Walker, Monstrous: The Autobiography of a Serial Killer But for the Grace of God

  • #29
    Tommy  Walker
    “Falling into this elaborate daydream about me and Heather Craven forever after. Imagining us as married professionals with our six towheaded children running loose in our suburbanite home as surrounded by a lush yard and fenced. Walking toward the door yelling, “Honey, I’m home!” and having Heather answer my call. Imagining the family dog jumping me, slobbering over in greeting and my laughing heartily as I was knocked to the ground. At one point getting so steeped in the fantasy that I actually found myself troubleshooting marital problems in advance, arguing with the fantasy love of my life before the dog grew on me over whether we should even have a dog; wasn’t six dependents enough? Losing the argument and then reluctantly accepting this new intrusion and competitor for Heather’s affections.”
    Tommy Walker, Monstrous: The Autobiography of a Serial Killer But for the Grace of God

  • #30
    Woody Allen
    “I took a speed-reading course and read War and Peace in twenty minutes. It involves Russia.”
    Woody Allen



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