Mackenzi > Mackenzi's Quotes

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  • #1
    David Levithan
    “I get it. The things you hope for the most are the things that destroy you in the end.”
    David Levithan


  • #1
    Garth Stein
    “The true hero is flawed. The true test of a champion is not whether he can triumph, but whether he can overcome obstacles - preferably of his own making - in order to triumph.”
    Garth Stein, The Art of Racing in the Rain


  • #1
    Laini Taylor
    “She had a sadness that was so deep, but it still could turn to light in a second, and when I saw her smile I wondered what it would be like to make her smile. I thought... I thought it would be like the discovery of smiling.”
    Laini Taylor, Daughter of Smoke & Bone


  • #2
    Gary D. Schmidt
    “The world turns and the world spins, the tide runs in and the tide runs out, and there is nothing in the world more beautiful and more wonderful in all its evolved forms than two souls who look at each other straight on. And there is nothing more woeful and soul-saddening than when they are parted...everything in the world rejoices in the touch, and everything in the world laments in the losing.”
    Gary D. Schmidt, Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy


  • #2
    Garth Stein
    “To live every day as if it had been stolen from death, that is how I would like to live. To feel the joy of life, as Eve felt the joy of life. To separate oneself from the burden, the angst, the anguish that we all encounter every day. To say I am alive, I am wonderful, I am. I am. That is something to aspire to.”
    Garth Stein, The Art of Racing in the Rain


  • #3
    Victor Hugo
    “He never went out without a book under his arm, and he often came back with two.”
    Victor Hugo, Les Misérables


  • #3
    Garth Stein
    “The car goes where the eyes go.”
    Garth Stein, The Art of Racing in the Rain


  • #4
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “I’m not sure what I’ll do, but— well, I want to go places and see people. I want my mind to grow. I want to live where things happen on a big scale.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Ice Palace and Other Stories


  • #4
    Garth Stein
    “She died that night. Her last breath took her soul, I saw it in my dream. I saw her soul leave her body as she exhaled, and then she had no more needs, no more reason; she was released from her body, and being released, she continued her journey elsewhere, high in the firmament where soul material gathers and plays out all the dreams and joys of which we temporal beings can barely conceive, all the things that are beyond our comprehension, but even so, are not beyond our attainment if we choose to attain them, and believe that we truly can.”
    Garth Stein, The Art of Racing in the Rain


  • #5
    Dylan Thomas
    “Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light.”
    Dylan Thomas, In Country Sleep, and Other Poems


  • #5
    Charlotte Brontë
    “Do you think I am an automaton? — a machine without feelings? and can bear to have my morsel of bread snatched from my lips, and my drop of living water dashed from my cup? Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! — I have as much soul as you — and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me, as it is now for me to leave you. I am not talking to you now through the medium of custom, conventionalities, nor even of mortal flesh: it is my spirit that addresses your spirit; just as if both had passed through the grave, and we stood at God's feet, equal — as we are!”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre


  • #6
    Rachel Hartman
    “I mistook you for a metaphor.”
    Rachel Hartman, Seraphina


  • #6
    Charlotte Brontë
    “Jane, be still; don't struggle so like a wild, frantic bird, that is rending its own plumage in its desperation."
    "I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being, with an independent will; which I now exert to leave you.”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre


  • #7
    Charlotte Brontë
    “It is a long way to Ireland, Janet, and I am sorry to send my little friend on such weary travels: but if I can't do better, how is it to be helped? Are you anything akin to me, do you think, Jane?"

    I could risk no sort of answer by this time: my heart was still.

    "Because, he said, "I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you - especially when you are near me, as now: it is as if I had a string somewhere under my left ribs, tightly and inextricably knotted to a similar string situated in the corresponding quarter of your little frame. And if that boisterous channel, and two hundred miles or so of land some broad between us, I am afraid that cord of communion will be snapt; and then I've a nervous notion I should take to bleeding inwardly. As for you, - you'd forget me.”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre


  • #7
    Rachel Hartman
    “We were all monsters and bastards, and we were all beautiful.”
    Rachel Hartman, Seraphina


  • #8
    Charlotte Brontë
    “It is in vain to say human beings ought to be satisfied with tranquillity: they must have action; and they will make it if they cannot find it. Millions are condemned to a stiller doom than mine, and millions are in silent revolt against their lot. Nobody knows how many rebellions besides political rebellions ferment in the masses of life which people earth. Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, to absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags. It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre


  • #8
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “For a transitory enchanted moment man must have held his breath in the presence of this continent, compelled into an aesthetic contemplation he neither understood nor desired, face to face for the last time in history with something commensurate to his capacity for wonder.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby


  • #9
    David Nicholls
    “What are you going to do with your life?" In one way or another it seemed that people had been asking her this forever; teachers, her parents, friends at three in the morning, but the question had never seemed this pressing and still she was no nearer an answer... "Live each day as if it's your last', that was the conventional advice, but really, who had the energy for that? What if it rained or you felt a bit glandy? It just wasn't practical. Better by far to be good and courageous and bold and to make difference. Not change the world exactly, but the bit around you. Cherish your friends, stay true to your principles, live passionately and fully and well. Experience new things. Love and be loved, if you ever get the chance.”
    David Nicholls, One Day


  • #9
    Buddy Wakefield
    “I should have told You
    before talking in terms of Forever
    that any given day wears me out and works me sour,
    that there are nights when the sky is so clear
    I stand obnoxious underneath it
    begging for the stars to shoot at me
    just so I can feel at Home.”
    Buddy Wakefield, Live for a Living


  • #10
    Mary Shelley
    “The world to me was a secret, which I desired to discover; to her it was a vacancy, which she sought to people with imaginations of her own.”
    Mary Shelley, Frankenstein


  • #10
    George Orwell
    “We shall meet in the place where there is no darkness.”
    George Orwell, 1984


  • #10
    William Shakespeare
    “Make me a willow cabin at your gate,
    And call upon my soul within the house;
    Write loyal cantons of contemned love
    And sing them loud even in the dead of night.”
    William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


  • #11
    Laini Taylor
    “Perhaps Fate laid out your life for you like a dress on a bed, and you could either wear it or go naked.”
    Laini Taylor
    tags: fate


  • #11
    George Orwell
    “We are the dead. Our only true life is in the future.”
    George Orwell, 1984


  • #12
    Laini Taylor
    “Stars got tangled in her hair whenever she played in the sky.”
    Laini Taylor


  • #12
    Arthur Conan Doyle
    “Excellent!" I cried. "Elementary," said he.”
    Arthur Conan Doyle, The Complete Sherlock Holmes


  • #12
    Natalie Babbitt
    “Don't be afraid of death; be afraid of an unlived life. You don't have to live forever, you just have to live.”
    Natalie Babbitt, Tuck Everlasting


  • #12
    Susan Dennard
    “Just before Jie and Daniel reached the street, Daniel stopped. He twirled around and gazed up at me, as if he had sensed my eyes on his back. He strode a few steps toward me, paused, and then strode two more.
    He slung off his cap and pressed it to his chest. Then,with the casual grace that marked all of his movements, he dropped to one knee and bowed his head.
    He was declaring fealty to his empress.
    I laughed-I couldn't help it. The absurdity of it all. The bittersweet sting.When he lifted back up, I saw he too wore a smile.He waved with his cap, and after flopping it back on his head, he swiveled and trotted to the street. Then,without another look back, the Spirit-Hunters left.”
    Susan Dennard, Something Strange and Deadly


  • #13
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “So we drove on toward death through the cooling twilight.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby


  • #13
    Laini Taylor
    “Kizzy wanted to be a woman who would dive off the prow of a sailboat into the sea, who would fall back in a tangle of sheets, laughing, and who could dance a tango, lazily stroke a leopard with her bare foot, freeze an enemy's blood with her eyes, make promises she couldn't possibly keep, and then shift the world to keep them. She wanted to write memoirs and autograph them at a tiny bookshop in Rome, with a line of admirers snaking down a pink-lit alley. She wanted to make love on a balcony, ruin someone, trade in esoteric knowledge, watch strangers as coolly as a cat. She wanted to be inscrutable, have a drink named after her, a love song written for her, and a handsome adventurer's small airplane, champagne-christened Kizzy, which would vanish one day in a windstorm in Arabia so that she would have to mount a rescue operation involving camels, and wear an indigo veil against the stinging sand, just like the nomads.
    Kizzy wanted.”
    Laini Taylor, Lips Touch: Three Times




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