Leola > Leola's Quotes

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  • #1
    Edward P. Jones
    “We are all worthy of one another.”
    Edward P. Jones, The Known World

  • #2
    Edward P. Jones
    “A woman, no matter the age, is always learning, always becoming. But a man . . . stops learning at fourteen or so.”
    Edward P. Jones, The Known World

  • #3
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    “Above all, don't lie to yourself. The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others. And having no respect he ceases to love.”
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

  • #4
    John Banville
    “The past beats inside me like a second heart.”
    John Banville, The Sea

  • #5
    Bill Callahan
    “And I hope each morning you wake like a bird in a nest and fly without a thought.”
    Bill Callahan, Letters to Emma Bowlcut

  • #6
    Bill Callahan
    “Your letter filled the hole in my day like a key.

    Turn it.”
    Bill Callahan

  • #7
    Bill Callahan
    “I wanted to hold you until I heard one voice. I stood without intention of moving and realized we see every punch coming in a boxing movie but in real life we miss a lot of them.”
    Bill Callahan, Letters to Emma Bowlcut
    tags: life, love

  • #8
    Bill Callahan
    “It crossed my mind that my letters are all about me and not you. I would hope that you pay me the same respect.”
    Bill Callahan, Letters to Emma Bowlcut

  • #9
    Bill Callahan
    “I sometimes see a shortcoming in myself, how little patience or understanding I have for many people in the way they act. I am able to see the fragility in some, but I only have so much time to wade through their manipulations and traps and draining behaviour. Some people think I'm heartless in leaving others to suffer their own selves.”
    Bill Callahan, Letters to Emma Bowlcut

  • #10
    Georgia O'Keeffe
    “To create one's own world takes courage.”
    Georgia O'Keeffe

  • #11
    Georgia O'Keeffe
    “Where I was born and where and how I have lived is unimportant. It is what I have done with where I have been that should be of interest.”
    Georgia O'Keeffe

  • #12
    Virginia Woolf
    “Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.”
    Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

  • #13
    Virginia Woolf
    “Blame it or praise it, there is no denying the wild horse in us.”
    Virginia Woolf, Jacob's Room

  • #14
    Virginia Woolf
    “It is in our idleness, in our dreams, that the submerged truth sometimes makes its way to the surface.”
    Virginia Woolf

  • #15
    Virginia Woolf
    “To put it in a nutshell, he was afflicted with a love of literature. It was the fatal nature of this disease to substitute a phantom for reality.”
    Virginia Woolf, Orlando

  • #16
    Virginia Woolf
    “To love makes one solitary.”
    Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway
    tags: love

  • #17
    Virginia Woolf
    “To want and not to have, sent all up her body a hardness, a hollowness, a strain. And then to want and not to have- to want and want- how that wrung the heart, and wrung it again and again!”
    Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse

  • #18
    Toni Morrison
    “At some point in life the world's beauty becomes enough. You don't need to photograph, paint, or even remember it. It is enough.”
    Toni Morrison

  • #19
    Toni Morrison
    “Love is never any better than the lover. ”
    Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye

  • #20
    David Lynch
    “I like to remember things my own way. How I remembered them, not necessarily the way they happened.”
    David Lynch, Lost Highway

  • #21
    Toni Morrison
    “Sunk in the grass of an empty lot on a spring Saturday, I split the stems of milkweed and thought about ants and peach pits and death and where the world went when I closed my eyes.”
    Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye

  • #22
    William Faulkner
    “I feel like a wet seed wild in the hot blind earth.”
    William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying

  • #23
    William Strunk Jr.
    “Omit needless words.”
    William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style / How to Speak and Write Correctly - Special Edition

  • #24
    Machado de Assis
    “The best thing to do is to loosen my grip on my pen and let it go wandering about until it finds an entrance. There must be one – everything depends on the circumstances, a rule applicable as much to literary style as to life. Each word tugs another one along, one idea another, and that is how books, governments and revolutions are made – some even say that is how Nature created her species.”
    Machado de Assis

  • #25
    Bei Dao
    “In the world I am
    Always a stranger
    I do not understand its language
    It does not understand my silence”
    Bei Dao

  • #26
    Janet Frame
    “There is no past or future. Using tenses to divide time is like making chalk marks on water.”
    Janet Frame

  • #27
    John Ruskin
    “The greatest thing a human being ever does in this world is to see something... To see clearly is poetry, prophecy and religion all in one.”
    John Ruskin

  • #28
    Edward Gorey
    “I should like a parsley sandwich.
    To the best of my knowledge they are not in season.”
    Edward Gorey

  • #29
    Patti Smith
    “Now, I can tell you about some women writers who truly are fantastic. One is Anna Kavan. She writes stories like I approach "Land of a Thousand Dances": she's caught in a haze and then a light, a little teeny light, come through. It could be a leopard, that light, or it could be a spot of blood. It could be anything. But she hooks onto that and spirals out. And she does it within the accessible rhythms of plot, and that's really exciting. She's not hung up with being a woman, she just keeps extending herself, keeps telescoping language and plot.

    Another great woman writer is Iris Sarazan, who wrote The Runaway. She considered herself a mare, a wild runaway. She was a really intelligent girl stuck in all these convents with a hungry mind. I identify with her 'cause of her hunger to go beyond herself. She wound up in prison, but she escaped and wrote some great books before kicking off. Her books aren't page after page of her beating her breast about how shitty she's been treated, they're books about her exciting telescoping plans of escape. Rhythm, great wild rhythm....

    The French poet, Rimbaud, predicted that the next great crop of writers would be women. He was the first guy who ever made a big women's liberation statement, saying that when women release themselves from the long servitude of men they're really gonna gush. New rhythms, new poetries, new horrors, new beauties. And I believe in that completely. (1976 Penthouse interview)”
    Patti Smith

  • #30
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge
    “Day after day, day after day,
    We stuck, nor breath nor motion;
    As idle as a painted ship
    Upon a painted ocean.”
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner



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