Ben > Ben's Quotes

(showing 1-15 of 15)
sort by

  • #1
    Elmore Leonard
    “Elmore Leonard's Ten Rules of Writing

    1. Never open a book with weather.
    2. Avoid prologues.
    3. Never use a verb other than "said" to carry dialogue.
    4. Never use an adverb to modify the verb "said”…he admonished gravely.
    5. Keep your exclamation points under control. You are allowed no more than two or three per 100,000 words of prose.
    6. Never use the words "suddenly" or "all hell broke loose."
    7. Use regional dialect, patois, sparingly.
    8. Avoid detailed descriptions of characters.
    9. Don't go into great detail describing places and things.
    10. Try to leave out the part that readers tend to skip.

    My most important rule is one that sums up the 10.

    If it sounds like writing, I rewrite it.”
    Elmore Leonard


  • #2
    Stephen Colbert
    “A father has to be a provider, a teacher, a role model, but most importantly, a distant authority figure who can never be pleased. Otherwise, how will children ever understand the concept of God?”
    Stephen Colbert, I Am America


  • #3
    Rudyard Kipling
    “If you can keep your head when all about you
    Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
    If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
    But make allowance for their doubting too;

    If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
    Or being lied about, don't deal in lies,
    Or being hated, don't give way to hating,
    And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise

    If you can dream - and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think - and not make thoughts your aim;
    If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same;

    If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
    Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
    Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
    And stoop and build 'em up with worn-out tools

    If you can make one heap of all your winnings
    And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
    And lose, and start again at your beginnings
    And never breathe a word about your loss;

    If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
    To serve your turn long after they are gone,
    And so hold on when there is nothing in you
    Except the will which says to them: 'Hold on!'

    If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
    Or walk with Kings - nor lose the common touch,
    If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
    If all men count with you, but none too much;

    If you can fill the unforgiving minute
    With sixty seconds' worth of distance run,
    Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
    And - which is more - you'll be a Man, my son!”
    Rudyard Kipling, If: A Father's Advice to His Son


  • #4
    Eleanor Roosevelt
    “You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, 'I have lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.' You must do the thing you think you cannot do.”
    Eleanor Roosevelt, You Learn by Living: Eleven Keys for a More Fulfilling Life


  • #5
    William Faulkner
    “A gentleman accepts the responsibility of his actions and bears the burden of their consequences.”
    William Faulkner


  • #6
    Hunter S. Thompson
    “The whole framework of the presidency is getting out of hand. It's come to the point where you almost can't run unless you can cause people to salivate and whip on each other with big sticks. You almost have to be a rock star to get the kind of fever you need to survive in American politics.”
    Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72


  • #7
    Winston S. Churchill
    “Never, never, never give in!”
    Winston S. Churchill


  • #8
    Winston S. Churchill
    “The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.”
    Winston S. Churchill


  • #9
    Dorothy Parker
    “The cure for boredom is curiosity.
    There is no cure for curiosity.”
    Dorothy Parker


  • #10
    Jon Stewart
    “I celebrated Thanksgiving in an old-fashioned way. I invited everyone in my neighborhood to my house, we had an enormous feast, and then I killed them and took their land.”
    Jon Stewart


  • #11
    Oscar Wilde
    “After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
    Oscar Wilde, A Woman of No Importance


  • #12
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    “I awoke this morning with devout thanksgiving for my friends, the old and the new.”
    Ralph Waldo Emerson


  • #13
    Stephen Colbert
    “‎You cannot correct an old person every time they say something offensive. You would never make it through Thanksgiving dinner!”
    Stephen Colbert


  • #14
    George Bernard Shaw
    “A Native American elder once described his own inner struggles in this manner: Inside of me there are two dogs. One of the dogs is mean and evil. The other dog is good. The mean dog fights the good dog all the time. When asked which dog wins, he reflected for a moment and replied, The one I feed the most.”
    George Bernard Shaw


  • #15
    George Bernard Shaw
    “War does not decide who is right but who is left.”
    George Bernard Shaw




Rss