Suzanne > Suzanne's Quotes

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  • #1
    C.S. Lewis
    “You can make anything by writing.”
    C.S. Lewis

  • #2
    C.S. Lewis
    “I am a product [...of] endless books. My father bought all the books he read and never got rid of any of them. There were books in the study, books in the drawing room, books in the cloakroom, books (two deep) in the great bookcase on the landing, books in a bedroom, books piled as high as my shoulder in the cistern attic, books of all kinds reflecting every transient stage of my parents' interest, books readable and unreadable, books suitable for a child and books most emphatically not. Nothing was forbidden me. In the seemingly endless rainy afternoons I took volume after volume from the shelves. I had always the same certainty of finding a book that was new to me as a man who walks into a field has of finding a new blade of grass.”
    C.S. Lewis

  • #3
    “There are 2,500 kinds of sponges, all of them consist largely of holes.”
    Will Cuppy

  • #4
    “Armadillos make affectionate pets, if you need affection that much.”
    Will Cuppy
    tags: pets

  • #5
    “Unfortunately, this world is full of people who are ready to think the worst when they see a man sneaking out of the wrong bedroom in the middle of the night.”
    Will Cuppy

  • #6
    “A hermit is simply a person to whom civilization has failed to adjust itself.”
    Will Cuppy

  • #7
    “We all make mistakes, but intelligence enables us to do it on purpose.”
    Will Cuppy

  • #8
    Peter S. Beagle
    “When I was alive, I believed — as you do — that time was at least as real and solid as myself, and probably more so. I said 'one o'clock' as though I could see it, and 'Monday' as though I could find it on the map; and I let myself be hurried along from minute to minute, day to day, year to year, as though I were actually moving from one place to another. Like everyone else, I lived in a house bricked up with seconds and minutes, weekends and New Year's Days, and I never went outside until I died, because there was no other door. Now I know that I could have walked through the walls. (...) You can strike your own time, and start the count anywhere. When you understand that — then any time at all will be the right time for you.”
    Peter S. Beagle, The Last Unicorn

  • #9
    Peter S. Beagle
    “The true secret in being a hero lies in knowing the order of things. The swineherd cannot already be wed to the princess when he embarks on his adventures, nor can the boy knock on the witch's door when she is already away on vacation. The wicked uncle cannot be found out and foiled before he does something wicked. Things must happen when it is time for them to happen. Quests may not simply be abandoned; prophecies may not be left to rot like unpicked fruit; unicorns may go unrescued for a very long time, but not forever. The happy ending cannot come in the middle of the story.”
    Peter S. Beagle, The Last Unicorn

  • #10
    Peter S. Beagle
    “Great heroes need great sorrows and burdens, or half their greatness goes unnoticed. It is all part of the fairy tale.”
    Peter S. Beagle, The Last Unicorn

  • #11
    Anne Frank
    “I want to go on living even after my death! And therefore I am grateful to God for this gift, this possibility of developing myself and of writing, of expressing all that is in me. I can shake off everything if I write; my sorrows disappear; my courage is reborn. But, and that is the great question, will I ever be able to write anything great, will I ever become a journalist or a writer?”
    Anne Frank

  • #12
    Anne Frank
    “People who have a religion should be glad, for not everyone has the gift of believing in heavenly things. You don't necessarily even have to be afraid of punishment after death; purgatory, hell, and heaven are things that a lot of people can't accept, but still a religion, it doesn't matter which, keeps a person on the right path. It isn't the fear of God but the upholding of one's own honor and conscience. How noble and good everyone could be if, every evening before falling asleep, they were to recall to their minds the events of the while day and consider exactly what has been good and bad. Then, without realizing it you try to improve yourself at the start of each new day; of course, you achieve quite a lot in the course of time. Anyone can do this, it costs nothing and is certainly very helpful. Whoever doesn't know it must learn and find by experience that: "A quiet conscience mades one strong!”
    Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl

  • #13
    Neil Gaiman
    “Have you ever been in love? Horrible isn't it? It makes you so vulnerable. It opens your chest and it opens up your heart and it means that someone can get inside you and mess you up. You build up all these defenses, you build up a whole suit of armor, so that nothing can hurt you, then one stupid person, no different from any other stupid person, wanders into your stupid life...You give them a piece of you. They didn't ask for it. They did something dumb one day, like kiss you or smile at you, and then your life isn't your own anymore. Love takes hostages. It gets inside you. It eats you out and leaves you crying in the darkness, so simple a phrase like 'maybe we should be just friends' turns into a glass splinter working its way into your heart. It hurts. Not just in the imagination. Not just in the mind. It's a soul-hurt, a real gets-inside-you-and-rips-you-apart pain. I hate love.”
    Neil Gaiman, The Kindly Ones

  • #14
    Neil Gaiman
    “Religions are, by definition, metaphors, after all: God is a dream, a hope, a woman, an ironist, a father, a city, a house of many rooms, a watchmaker who left his prize chronometer in the desert, someone who loves you—even, perhaps, against all evidence, a celestial being whose only interest is to make sure your football team, army, business, or marriage thrives, prospers, and triumphs over all opposition. Religions are places to stand and look and act, vantage points from which to view the world. So none of this is happening. Such things could not occur. Never a word of it is literally true.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #15
    Neil Gaiman
    “Fiction allows us to slide into these other heads, these other places, and look out through other eyes. And then in the tale we stop before we die, or we die vicariously and unharmed, and in the world beyond the tale we turn the page or close the book, and we resume our lives.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #16
    Neil Gaiman
    “Gods die. And when they truly die they are unmourned and unremembered. Ideas are more difficult to kill than people, but they can be killed, in the end.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #17
    Neil Gaiman
    “Liberty," boomed Wednesday, as they walked to the car, "is a bitch who must be bedded on a mattress of corpses.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #18
    Neil Gaiman
    “There was a tale he had read once, long ago, as a small boy: the story of a traveler who had slipped down a cliff, with man-eating tigers above him and a lethal fall below him, who managed to stop his fall halfway down the side of the cliff, holding on for dear life. There was a clump of strawberries beside him, and certain death above him and below. What should he do? went the question.

    And the reply was, Eat the strawberries.

    The story had never made sense to him as a boy. It did now.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #19
    Neil Gaiman
    “We do not always remember the things that do no credit to us. We justify them, cover them in bright lies or with the thick dust of forgetfulness. All of the things that Shadow had done in his life of which he was not proud, all the things he wished he had done otherwise or left undone, came at him then in a swirling storm of guilt and regret and shame, and he had nowhere to hide from them. He was as naked and as open as a corpse on a table, and dark Anubis the jackal god was his prosector and his prosecutor and his persecutor.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #20
    Neil Gaiman
    “This isn't about what is . . . it's about what people think is. It's all imaginary anyway. That's why it's important. People only fight over imaginary things.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #21
    Neil Gaiman
    “The TV's the altar. I'm what people are sacrificing to.'
    'What do they sacrifice?' asked Shadow.
    'Their time, mostly,' said Lucy. 'Sometimes each other.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #22
    Neil Gaiman
    “Too much talking these days. Talk talk talk. This country would get along much better if people learned how to suffer in silence.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #23
    Neil Gaiman
    “It's perfectly simple," said Wednesday. "In other countries, over the years, people recognized the places of power. Sometimes it would be a natural formation, sometimes it would just be a place that was, somehow, special. They knew that something important was happening there, that there was some focusing point, some channel, some window to the Immanent. And so they would build temples or cathedrals, or erect stone circles, or...well, you get the idea."

    "There are churches all across the States, though," said Shadow.

    "In every town. Sometimes on every block. And about as significant, in this context, as dentists' offices. No, in the USA, people still get the call, or some of them, and they feel themselves being called to from the transcendent void, and they respond to it by building a model out of beer bottles of somewhere they've never visited, or by erecting a gigantic bat house in some part of the country that bats have traditionally declined to visit. Roadside attractions: people feel themselves pulled to places where, in other parts of the world, they would recognize that part of themselves that is truly transcendent, and buy a hot dog, and walk around, feeling satisfied on a level they cannot truly describe, and profoundly dissatisfied on a level beneath that.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #24
    Neil Gaiman
    “There are new gods growing in America, clinging to growing knots of belief: gods of credit card and freeway, of Internet and telephone, of radio and hospital and television, gods of plastic and of beeper and of neon. Proud gods, fat and foolish creatures, puffed up with their own newness and importance. "They are aware of us, they fear us, and they hate us," said Odin. "You are fooling yourselves if you believe otherwise.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #25
    Neil Gaiman
    “Some things may change," said Wednesday, abruptly. "People, however... People stay the same.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #26
    Neil Gaiman
    “I think I would rather be a man than a god. We don’t need anyone to believe in us. We just keep going anyhow. It’s what we do.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #27
    Neil Gaiman
    “Nobody's American," said Wednesday. "Not originally. That's my point.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #28
    Neil Gaiman
    “You can always cheat an honest man, but it takes more work.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #29
    Neil Gaiman
    “We build a shell around it, like an oyster dealing with a painful particle of grit, coating it with smooth pearl layers in order to cope. This is how we walk and talk and function , day in, day out. Immune to others’ pain and loss.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods

  • #30
    Neil Gaiman
    “Back in my day, we had it all set up. You lined up when you died, and you'd answer for your evil deeds and your good deeds, and if your evil deeds outweighed a feather, we'd feed your soul and your heart to Ammet, the Eater of Souls"
    "He must have eaten a lot of people."
    "Not as many as you'd think. It was a really heavy feather. We had it made special. You had better be pretty damn evil to tip the scales on that baby...”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods



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