Cameron > Cameron's Quotes

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  • #1
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    “What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.”
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • #2
    John Locke
    “One unerring mark of the love of truth is not entertaining any proposition with greater assurance than the proofs it is built upon will warrant.”
    John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

  • #3
    Gordon B. Hinckley
    “Stop seeking out the storms and enjoy more fully the sunlight.”
    Gordon B. Hinckley

  • #4
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    “The mind, once stretched by a new idea, never returns to its original dimensions.”
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • #5
    Gordon B. Hinckley
    “Without hard work, nothing grows but weeds.”
    Gordon B. Hinckley
    tags: work

  • #6
    Mahatma Gandhi
    “Be the change that you wish to see in the world.”
    Mahatma Gandhi

  • #7
    Martin Luther King Jr.
    “Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.”
    Martin Luther King Jr., A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings and Speeches

  • #8
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    “Peace cannot be achieved through violence, it can only be attained through understanding.”
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • #9
    Mahatma Gandhi
    “An eye for an eye will only make the whole world blind.”
    Mahatma Gandhi

  • #10
    Penn Jillette
    “If there's something you really want to believe, that's what you should question the most.”
    Penn Jillette

  • #11
    Thomas Jefferson
    “4. Religion. Your reason is now mature enough to examine this object. In the first place, divest yourself of all bias in favor of novelty & singularity of opinion... shake off all the fears & servile prejudices, under which weak minds are servilely crouched. Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call to her tribunal every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear. You will naturally examine first, the religion of your own country. Read the Bible, then as you would read Livy or Tacitus. The facts which are within the ordinary course of nature, you will believe on the authority of the writer, as you do those of the same kind in Livy and Tacitus. The testimony of the writer weighs in their favor, in one scale, and their not being against the laws of nature, does not weigh against them. But those facts in the Bible which contradict the laws of nature, must be examined with more care, and under a variety of faces. Here you must recur to the pretensions of the writer to inspiration from God. Examine upon what evidence his pretensions are founded, and whether that evidence is so strong, as that its falsehood would be more improbable than a change in the laws of nature, in the case he relates. For example in the book of Joshua we are told the sun stood still several hours. Were we to read that fact in Livy or Tacitus we should class it with their showers of blood, speaking of statues, beasts, &c. But it is said that the writer of that book was inspired. Examine therefore candidly what evidence there is of his having been inspired. The pretension is entitled to your inquiry, because millions believe it. On the other hand you are astronomer enough to know how contrary it is to the law of nature that a body revolving on its axis as the earth does, should have stopped, should not by that sudden stoppage have prostrated animals, trees, buildings, and should after a certain time have resumed its revolution, & that without a second general prostration. Is this arrest of the earth's motion, or the evidence which affirms it, most within the law of probabilities? You will next read the New Testament. It is the history of a personage called Jesus. Keep in your eye the opposite pretensions: 1, of those who say he was begotten by God, born of a virgin, suspended & reversed the laws of nature at will, & ascended bodily into heaven; and 2, of those who say he was a man of illegitimate birth, of a benevolent heart, enthusiastic mind, who set out without pretensions to divinity, ended in believing them, and was punished capitally for sedition, by being gibbeted, according to the Roman law, which punished the first commission of that offence by whipping, & the second by exile, or death in fureâ.

    ...Do not be frightened from this inquiry by any fear of its consequences. If it ends in a belief that there is no God, you will find incitements to virtue in the comfort and pleasantness you feel in its exercise, and the love of others which it will procure you... In fine, I repeat, you must lay aside all prejudice on both sides, and neither believe nor reject anything, because any other persons, or description of persons, have rejected or believed it... I forgot to observe, when speaking of the New Testament, that you should read all the histories of Christ, as well of those whom a council of ecclesiastics have decided for us, to be Pseudo-evangelists, as those they named Evangelists. Because these Pseudo-evangelists pretended to inspiration, as much as the others, and you are to judge their pretensions by your own reason, and not by the reason of those ecclesiastics. Most of these are lost...

    [Letter to his nephew, Peter Carr, advising him in matters of religion, 1787]”
    Thomas Jefferson, Letters of Thomas Jefferson

  • #12
    Thomas A. Edison
    “I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.”
    Thomas A. Edison

  • #13
    Elie Wiesel
    “The opposite of love is not hate, it's indifference. The opposite of art is not ugliness, it's indifference. The opposite of faith is not heresy, it's indifference. And the opposite of life is not death, it's indifference.”
    Elie Wiesel

  • #14
    George Harrison
    “If you don't know where you're going, any road'll take you there”
    George Harrison

  • #15
    Jon Stewart
    “You have to remember one thing about the will of the people: it wasn't that long ago that we were swept away by the Macarena.”
    Jon Stewart

  • #16
    Thomas Jefferson
    “On matters of style, swim with the current, on matters of principle, stand like a rock.”
    Thomas Jefferson

  • #17
    George Washington
    “It is better to offer no excuse than a bad one.”
    George Washington

  • #18
    Brigham Young
    “If you are ever called upon to chasten a person, never chasten beyond the balm you have within you to bind up.”
    Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, Volume 9

  • #19
    Thomas S. Monson
    “Never let a problem to be solved, become more important than a person to be loved.”
    Thomas S. Monson

  • #20
    Friedrich Nietzsche
    “He who has a why to live for can bear almost any how.”
    Friedrich Nietzsche

  • #21
    Lemony Snicket
    “People aren't either wicked or noble. They're like chef's salads, with good things and bad things chopped and mixed together in a vinaigrette of confusion and conflict.”
    Lemony Snicket, The Grim Grotto

  • #22
    Eleanor Roosevelt
    “You wouldn't worry so much about what others think of you if you realized how seldom they do.”
    Eleanor Roosevelt

  • #23
    Gordon B. Hinckley
    “Life is to be enjoyed, not endured”
    Gordon B. Hinckley

  • #24
    Gordon B. Hinckley
    “Generally speaking, the most miserable people I know are those who are obsessed with themselves; the happiest people I know are those who lose themselves in the service of others...By and large, I have come to see that if we complain about life, it is because we are thinking only of ourselves.”
    Gordon B. Hinckley

  • #25
    Gordon B. Hinckley
    “Being humble means recognizing that we are not on earth to see how important we can become, but to see how much difference we can make in the lives of others”
    Gordon B. Hinckley

  • #26
    Doreen Valiente
    “Therefore, let there be beauty and strength, power and compassion, honor and humility, mirth and reverence within you.”
    Doreen Valiente, Charge of the Goddess: The Mother of Modern Witchcraft

  • #27
    Confucius
    “The strength of a nation derives from the integrity of the home.”
    Confucius

  • #28
    Confucius
    “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.”
    Confucius

  • #29
    Confucius
    “The gem cannot be polished without friction, nor man perfected without trials.”
    Confucius

  • #30
    Seneca
    “Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.”
    Seneca



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