Cassandra > Cassandra's Quotes

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  • #1
    C.S. Lewis
    “Literature adds to reality, it does not simply describe it. It enriches the necessary competencies that daily life requires and provides; and in this respect, it irrigates the deserts that our lives have already become.”
    C.S. Lewis

  • #2
    Graham Greene
    “A story has no beginning or end: arbitrarily one chooses that moment of experience from which to look back or from which to look ahead.”
    Graham Greene, The End of the Affair

  • #3
    Gustave Flaubert
    “Human speech is like a cracked kettle on which we tap crude rhythms for bears to dance to, while we long to make music that will melt the stars.”
    Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary

  • #4
    Dorothy L. Sayers
    “It is arguable that when Humanists, "Shook off," as people say, "the trammels of religion," and discovered things of this world as objects of veneration in their own right... they began to lose the finer appreciation of even the world itself. Thus to the Christian centuries, the flesh was holy (or sacer at least in one sense or the other), and they veiled its awful majesty; to the Humanist centuries it was divine in its own right, and they exhibited it. Now it is the commonplace of the magazine cover. It has lost its numen. So too with the cult of knowledge for its own sake declining from the Revival of Learning to the Brains Trust.”
    Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatorio

  • #5
    Dorothy L. Sayers
    “Do you find it easy to get drunk on words?"

    "So easy that, to tell you the truth, I am seldom perfectly sober.”
    Dorothy L. Sayers, Gaudy Night

  • #6
    George Eliot
    “Our deeds determine us, as much as we determine our deeds.”
    George Eliot, Adam Bede

  • #7
    C.S. Lewis
    “When the time comes to you at which you will be forced at last to utter the speech which has lain at the center of your soul for years, which you have, all that time, idiot-like, been saying over and over, you'll not talk about the joy of words. I saw well why the gods do not speak to us openly, nor let us answer. Till that word can be dug out of us, why should they hear the babble that we think we mean? How can they meet us face to face till we have faces?”
    C.S. Lewis, Till We Have Faces

  • #8
    C.S. Lewis
    “Don't use words too big for the subject. Don't say infinitely when you mean very; otherwise you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite.”
    C.S. Lewis

  • #9
    Dorothy L. Sayers
    “Books... are like lobster shells, we surround ourselves with 'em, then we grow out of 'em and leave 'em behind, as evidence of our earlier stages of development.”
    Dorothy L. Sayers, The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club

  • #10
    George Eliot
    “No evil dooms us hopelessly except the evil we love, and desire to continue in, and make no effort to escape from. ”
    George Eliot, Daniel Deronda

  • #11
    C.S. Lewis
    “Critics who treat 'adult' as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”
    C.S. Lewis

  • #12
    Charles Dickens
    “It's in vain to recall the past, unless it works some influence upon the present.”
    Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

  • #13
    Dorothy L. Sayers
    “The best remedy for a bruised heart is not, as so many people think, repose upon a manly bosom. Much more efficacious are honest work, physical activity, and the sudden acquisition of wealth.”
    Dorothy L. Sayers, Have His Carcase

  • #14
    Charles Dickens
    “There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts.”
    Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

  • #15
    George Eliot
    “It is very hard to say the exact truth, even about your own immediate feelings – much harder than to say something fine about them which is not the exact truth.”
    George Eliot, Adam Bede
    tags: truth

  • #16
    Edith Wharton
    “Ah, good conversation - there's nothing like it, is there? The air of ideas is the only air worth breathing.”
    Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence

  • #17
    C.S. Lewis
    “Miracles do not, in fact, break the laws of nature.”
    C.S. Lewis, Miracles

  • #18
    C.S. Lewis
    “You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.”
    C.S. Lewis

  • #19
    Dorothy L. Sayers
    “How fleeting are all human passions compared with the massive continuity of ducks.”
    Dorothy L. Sayers, Gaudy Night

  • #20
    George Eliot
    “But the effect of her being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch

  • #21
    William Shakespeare
    “Time travels at different speeds for different people. I can tell you who time strolls for, who it trots for, who it gallops for, and who it stops cold for.”
    William Shakespeare, As You Like It

  • #22
    C.S. Lewis
    “Write about what really interests you, whether it is real things or imaginary things, and nothing else.”
    C.S. Lewis

  • #23
    George Eliot
    “What destroys us most effectively is not a malign fate but our own capacity for self-deception and for degrading our own best self.”
    George Eliot, Adam Bede
    tags: self

  • #24
    Edith Wharton
    “As the pain that can be told is but half a pain, so the pity that questions has little healing in its touch. What Lily craved was the darkness made by enfolding arms, the silence which is not solitude, but compassion holding its breath.”
    Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth

  • #25
    Daphne du Maurier
    “I wondered why it was that places are so much lovelier when one is alone. How commonplace and stupid it would be if I had a friend now, sitting beside me, someone I had known at school, who would say: “By-the-way, I saw old Hilda the other day. You remember her, the one who was so good at tennis. She’s married, with two children.” And the bluebells beside us unnoticed, and the pigeons overhead unheard. I did not want anyone with me. Not even Maxim. If Maxim had been there I should not be lying as I was now, chewing a piece of grass, my eyes shut. I should have been watching him, watching his eyes, his expression. Wondering if he liked it, if he was bored. Wondering what he was thinking. Now I could relax, none of these things mattered. Maxim was in London. How lovely it was to be alone again.”
    Daphne du Maurier, Rebecca

  • #26
    C.S. Lewis
    “There is but one good; that is God. Everything else is good when it looks to Him and bad when it turns from Him.”
    C.S. Lewis, The Great Divorce
    tags: god

  • #27
    C.S. Lewis
    “Literary experience heals the wound, without undermining the privilege, of individuality.”
    C.S. Lewis

  • #28
    Edith Wharton
    “The very good people did not convince me; I felt they'd never been tempted. But you knew; you understood; you felt the world outside tugging at one with all its golden hands - and you hated the things it asked of one; you hated happiness bought by disloyalty and cruelty and indifference. That was what I'd never known before - and it's better than anything I've known.”
    Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence

  • #29
    Dorothy L. Sayers
    “. . . the fellow's got a bee in his bonnet. Thinks God's a secretion of the liver--all right once in a way, but there's no need to keep on about it. There's nothing you can't prove if your outlook is only sufficiently limited.”
    Dorothy L. Sayers, Whose Body?

  • #30
    Dorothy L. Sayers
    “In the world it is called Tolerance, but in hell it is called Despair...the sin that believes in nothing, cares for nothing, seeks to know nothing, interferes with nothing, enjoys nothing, hates nothing, finds purpose in nothing, lives for nothing, and remains alive because there is nothing for which it will die.”
    Dorothy L. Sayers



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