Lisa > Lisa's Quotes

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  • #1
    Charlotte Brontë
    “Do you think I am an automaton? — a machine without feelings? and can bear to have my morsel of bread snatched from my lips, and my drop of living water dashed from my cup? Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! — I have as much soul as you — and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me, as it is now for me to leave you. I am not talking to you now through the medium of custom, conventionalities, nor even of mortal flesh: it is my spirit that addresses your spirit; just as if both had passed through the grave, and we stood at God's feet, equal — as we are!”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

  • #2
    Ayn Rand
    “The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me.”
    Ayn Rand

  • #3
    Suzanne Collins
    “Even though I don't ask, Plutarch gives me cheerful updates on the phone like "Good news, Katniss! I think we've almost got him convinced you're not a mutt!" Or "Today he was allowed to feed himself pudding!”
    Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

  • #4
    Khaled Hosseini
    “But better to get hurt by the truth than comforted with a lie.”
    Khaled Hosseini

  • #5
    Gordon B. Hinckley
    “True love is not so much a matter of romance as it is a matter of anxious concern for the well-being of one's companion.”
    Gordon B. Hinckley, Stand a Little Taller

  • #6
    Charlotte Brontë
    “Jane, be still; don't struggle so like a wild, frantic bird, that is rending its own plumage in its desperation."
    "I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being, with an independent will; which I now exert to leave you.”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

  • #7
    Charlotte Brontë
    “No sight so sad as that of a naughty child," he began, "especially a naughty little girl. Do you know where the wicked go after death?"

    "They go to hell," was my ready and orthodox answer.

    "And what is hell? Can you tell me that?"

    "A pit full of fire."

    "And should you like to fall into that pit, and to be burning there for ever?"

    "No, sir."

    "What must you do to avoid it?"

    I deliberated a moment: my answer, when it did come was objectionable: "I must keep in good health and not die.”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

  • #8
    Charlotte Brontë
    “Reader, I married him.”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

  • #9
    Charlotte Brontë
    “Every atom of your flesh is as dear to me as my own: in pain and sickness it would still be dear.”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

  • #10
    Charlotte Brontë
    “I had not intended to love him; the reader knows I had wrought hard to extirpate from my soul the germs of love there detected; and now, at the first renewed view of him, they spontaneously revived, great and strong! He made me love him without looking at me.”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

  • #11
    Sylvia Plath
    “I can never read all the books I want; I can never be all the people I want and live all the lives I want. I can never train myself in all the skills I want. And why do I want? I want to live and feel all the shades, tones and variations of mental and physical experience possible in my life. And I am horribly limited.”
    Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath

  • #12
    Sylvia Plath
    “If neurotic is wanting two mutually exclusive things at one and the same time, then I'm neurotic as hell. I'll be flying back and forth between one mutually exclusive thing and another for the rest of my days.”
    Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar

  • #13
    Sylvia Plath
    “I saw my life branching out before me like the green fig tree in the story. From the tip of every branch, like a fat purple fig, a wonderful future beckoned and winked. One fig was a husband and a happy home and children, and another fig was a famous poet and another fig was a brilliant professor, and another fig was Ee Gee, the amazing editor, and another fig was Europe and Africa and South America, and another fig was Constantin and Socrates and Attila and a pack of other lovers with queer names and offbeat professions, and another fig was an Olympic lady crew champion, and beyond and above these figs were many more figs I couldn't quite make out. I saw myself sitting in the crotch of this fig tree, starving to death, just because I couldn't make up my mind which of the figs I would choose. I wanted each and every one of them, but choosing one meant losing all the rest, and, as I sat there, unable to decide, the figs began to wrinkle and go black, and, one by one, they plopped to the ground at my feet.”
    Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar

  • #14
    Sylvia Plath
    “There is nothing like puking with somebody to make you into old friends.”
    Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar

  • #15
    Sylvia Plath
    “I felt wise and cynical as all hell.”
    Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar

  • #16
    Sylvia Plath
    “Why honey, don't you want to get dressed?"

    My mother took care never to tell me to do anything. She would only reason with me sweetly, like one intelligent, mature person with another.

    It's almost three in the afternoon."

    I'm writing a novel," I said. "I haven't got time to change into this and change into that.”
    Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar

  • #17
    Suzanne Collins
    “You love me. Real or not real?"
    I tell him, "Real.”
    Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

  • #18
    Suzanne Collins
    “Destroying things is much easier than making them.”
    Suzanne Collins, The Hunger Games

  • #19
    Suzanne Collins
    “So it's you and a syringe against the Capitol? See, this is why no one lets you make the plans.”
    Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire

  • #20
    Suzanne Collins
    “Finnick?" I say, "Maybe some pants?"
    He looks down at his legs as if noticing his outfit for the first time. Then he whips off his hospital gown leaving him in just his underwear. "Why? Do you find this" -- he strikes a ridiculously provocative pose -- "distracting?"
    I laugh. Boggs looks embarrassed and Finnick looks more like the guy I met at the Quarter Quell”
    Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

  • #21
    Suzanne Collins
    “Stupid people are dangerous.”
    Suzanne Collins, The Hunger Games

  • #22
    Suzanne Collins
    “I clench his hands to the point of pain. "Stay with me."
    His pupils contract to pinpoints, dialate again rapidly, and then return to something resembling normalcy. "Always," he murmurs.”
    Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

  • #23
    Leif Enger
    “Real miracles bother people, like strange sudden pains unknown in medical literature. It's true: They rebut every rule all we good citizens take comfort in. Lazarus obeying orders and climbing up out of the grave - now there's a miracle, and you can bet it upset a lot of folks who were standing around at the time. When a person dies, the earth is generally unwilling to cough him back up. A miracle contradicts the will of the earth.”
    Leif Enger, Peace Like a River

  • #24
    Leif Enger
    “My sister, Swede, who often sees to the nub, offered this: People fear miracles because they fear being changed--though ignoring them will change you also. Swede said another thing, too, and it rang in me like a bell: No miracle happens without a witness. Someone to declare, Here's what I saw. Here's how it went. Make of it what you will.”
    Leif Enger

  • #25
    Leif Enger
    “I remember it as October days are always remembered, cloudless, maple-flavored, the air gold and so clean it quivers.”
    Leif Enger, Peace Like a River

  • #26
    Janet Fitch
    “
Loneliness is the human condition. Cultivate it. The way it tunnels into you allows your soul room to grow. Never expect to outgrow loneliness. Never hope to find people who will understand you, someone to fill that space. An intelligent, sensitive person is the exception, the very great exception. If you expect to find people who will understand you, you will grow murderous with disappointment. The best you'll ever do is to understand yourself, know what it is that you want, and not let the cattle stand in your way.”
    Janet Fitch, White Oleander

  • #27
    Janet Fitch
    “In a perverse way, I was glad for the stitches, glad it would show, that there would be scars. What was the point in just being hurt on the inside? It should bloody well show.”
    Janet Fitch

  • #28
    Janet Fitch
    “Don't attach yourself to anyone who shows you the least bit of attention because you're lonely. Lonliness is the human condition. No one is ever going to fill that space. The best thing you can do it know yourself... know what you want.”
    Janet Fitch

  • #29
    Janet Fitch
    “I don't let anyone touch me," I finally said.
    Why not?"
    Why not? Because I was tired of men. Hanging in doorways, standing too close, their smell of beer or fifteen-year-old whiskey. Men who didn't come to the emergency room with you, men who left on Christmas Eve. Men who slammed the security gates, who made you love them then changed their minds. Forests of boys, their ragged shrubs full of eyes following you, grabbing your breasts, waving their money, eyes already knocking you down, taking what they felt was theirs. (...) It was a play and I knew how it ended, I didn't want to audition for any of the roles. It was no game, no casual thrill. It was three-bullet Russian roulette.”
    Janet Fitch, White Oleander

  • #30
    Janet Fitch
    “It's such a liability to love another person.”
    Janet Fitch, White Oleander



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