Bridgette Hinton > Bridgette's Quotes

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  • #121
    Virginia Woolf
    “What one means by integrity, in the case of the novelist, is the conviction that he gives one that this is the truth. Yes, one feels, I should never have thought that this could be so; I have never known people behaving like that. But you have convinced me that so it is, so it happens. One holds every phrase, every scene to the light as one reads—for Nature seems, very oddly, to have provided us with an inner light by which to judge of the novelist’s integrity or disintegrity. Or perhaps it is rather that Nature, in her most irrational mood, has traced in invisible ink on the walls of the mind a premonition which these great artists confirm; a sketch which only needs to be held to the fire of genius to become visible. When one so exposes it and sees it come to life one exclaims in rapture, But this is what I have always felt and known and desired!”
    Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

  • #122
    Virginia Woolf
    “the thought process:
    "It swayed, minute after minute, hither and thither among the reflections and the weeds, letting the water lift it and sink it, until - you know the little tug - the sudden conglomeration of an idea at the end of one's line: and then the cautious hauling of it in, and the careful laying of it out?" p.5”
    Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

  • #123
    Virginia Woolf
    “They lack suggestive power. And when a book lacks suggestive power, however hard it hits the surface of the mind it cannot penetrate within.”
    Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own
    tags: books

  • #124
    Virginia Woolf
    “Chastity ... has, even now, a religious importance in a woman's life, and has so wrapped itself round with nerves and instincts that to cut it free and bring it to the light of day demands courage of the rarest.”
    Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

  • #125
    Virginia Woolf
    “One can only show how one came to hold whatever opinion one does hold.”
    Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

  • #126
    Virginia Woolf
    “Women have sat indoors all these millions of years, so that by this time the very walls are permeated by their creative force, which has, indeed, so overcharged the capacity of bricks and mortar that it must needs harness itself to pens and brushes and business and politics.”
    Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

  • #127
    Kate Douglas Wiggin
    “Miranda Sawyer had a heart, of course, but she had never used it for any other purpose than the pumping and circulating of blood.”
    Kate Douglas Wiggin, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm

  • #128
    Kate Douglas Wiggin
    “The soul grows into lovely habits as easily as into ugly ones, and the moment a life begins to blossom into beautiful words and deeds, that moment a new standard of conduct is established, and your eager neighbors look to you for a continuous manifestation of the good cheer, the sympathy, the ready wit, the comradeship, or the inspiration, you once showed yourself capable of. Bear figs for a season or two, and the world outside the orchard is very unwilling you should bear thistles.”
    Kate Douglas Wiggin, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm

  • #129
    E.B. White
    “After all, what's a life, anyway? We're born, we live a little while, we die.”
    E.B. White, Charlotte's Web

  • #130
    E.B. White
    “What do you mean less than nothing? I don't think there is any such thing as less than nothing. Nothing is absolutely the limit of nothingness. It's the lowest you can go. It's the end of the line. How can something be less than nothing? If there were something that was less than nothing, then nothing would not be nothing, it would be something - even though it's just a very little bit of something. But if nothing is nothing, then nothing has nothing that is less than it is.”
    E.B. White, Charlotte's Web

  • #131
    Eudora Welty
    “The mystery in how little we know of other people is no greater than the mystery of how much, Laurel thought.”
    Eudora Welty, The Optimist's Daughter

  • #132
    Eudora Welty
    “Laurel could not see her face but only the back of her neck, the most vulnerable part of anybody, and she thought: Is there any sleeping person you can be entirely sure you have not misjudged?”
    Eudora Welty, The Optimist's Daughter

  • #133
    “Nico: "Prodigium effodio" -- what does that mean again?
    Vision: Excavating monster. It's Latin.
    Nico: Damn, how much time did you spend in the library?
    Vision: I am a library.”
    Zeb Wells, Civil War: Young Avengers/Runaways

  • #134
    Horace Walpole
    “I can forgive injuries, but never benefits.”
    Horace Walpole, The Castle of Otranto

  • #135
    Horace Walpole
    “The gentle maid, whose hapless tale,
    these melancholy pages speak;
    say, gracious lady, shall she fail
    To draw the tear a down from thy cheek?”
    Horace Walpole, The Castle of Otranto

  • #136
    Robert James Waller
    “It's clear to me now that I have been moving toward you and you toward me for a long time. Though neither of us was aware of the other before we met, there was a kind of mindless certainty bumming blithely along beneath our ignorance that ensured we would come together. Like two solitary birds flying the great prairies by celestial reckoning, all of these years and lifetimes we have been moving toward one another.”
    Robert James Waller, The Bridges of Madison County
    tags: love

  • #137
    Robert James Waller
    “Analysis destroys wholes. Some things, magic things, are meant to stay whole. If you look at their pieces, they go away.”
    Robert James Waller, The Bridges Of Madison County

  • #138
    Robert James Waller
    “Such physical matters were nice, yet, to him, intelligence and passion born of living, the ability to move and be moved by subtleties of the mind and spirit, were what really counted.”
    Robert James Waller, The Bridges of Madison County

  • #139
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “Everything was beautiful and nothing hurt.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

  • #140
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “Like so many Americans, she was trying to construct a life that made sense from things she found in gift shops.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

  • #141
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “All this happened, more or less.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

  • #142
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “I have this disease late at night sometimes, involving alcohol and the telephone.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

  • #143
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “And I asked myself about the present: how wide it was, how deep it was, how much was mine to keep.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

  • #144
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “America is the wealthiest nation on Earth, but its people are mainly poor, and poor Americans are urged to hate themselves. To quote the American humorist Kin Hubbard, 'It ain’t no disgrace to be poor, but it might as well be.' It is in fact a crime for an American to be poor, even though America is a nation of poor. Every other nation has folk traditions of men who were poor but extremely wise and virtuous, and therefore more estimable than anyone with power and gold. No such tales are told by the American poor. They mock themselves and glorify their betters. The meanest eating or drinking establishment, owned by a man who is himself poor, is very likely to have a sign on its wall asking this cruel question: 'if you’re so smart, why ain’t you rich?' There will also be an American flag no larger than a child’s hand – glued to a lollipop stick and flying from the cash register.

    Americans, like human beings everywhere, believe many things that are obviously untrue. Their most destructive untruth is that it is very easy for any American to make money. They will not acknowledge how in fact hard money is to come by, and, therefore, those who have no money blame and blame and blame themselves. This inward blame has been a treasure for the rich and powerful, who have had to do less for their poor, publicly and privately, than any other ruling class since, say Napoleonic times. Many novelties have come from America. The most startling of these, a thing without precedent, is a mass of undignified poor. They do not love one another because they do not love themselves.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

  • #145
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “She was a dull person, but a sensational invitation to make babies.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

  • #146
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “That's one thing Earthlings might learn to do, if they tried hard enough: Ignore the awful times and concentrate on the good ones.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

  • #147
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “- Why me?
    - That is a very Earthling question to ask, Mr. Pilgrim. Why you? Why us for that matter? Why anything? Because this moment simply is. Have you ever seen bugs trapped in amber?
    - Yes.
    - Well, here we are, Mr. Pilgrim, trapped in the amber of this moment. There is no why.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

  • #148
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “I am a Tralfamadorian, seeing all time as you might see a stretch of the Rocky Mountains. All time is all time. It does not change. It does not lend itself to warnings or explanations. It simply is.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

  • #149
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “There is no beginning, no middle, no end, no suspense, no moral, no causes, no effects. What we love in our books are the depths of many marvelous moments seen all at one time.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

  • #150
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “The letter said that they were two feet high, and green., and shaped like plumber's friends. Their suction cups were on the ground, and their shafts, which were extremely flexible, usually pointed to the sky. At the top of each shaft was a little hand with a green eye in its palm. The creatures were friendly, and they could see in four dimensions. They pitied Earthlings for being able to see only three. They had many wonderful things to teach Earthlings, especially about time. Billy promised to tell what some of those wonderful things were in his next letter.
    Billy was working on his second letter when the first letter was published. The second letter started out like this:
    The most important thing I learned on Tralfamadore was that when a person dies he only appears to die. He is still very much alive in the past, so it is very silly for people to cry at his funeral. All moments, past, present and future, always have existed, always will exist. The Tralfamadorians can look at all the different moments just that way we can look at a stretch of the Rocky Mountains, for instance. They can see how permanent all the moments are, and they can look at any moment that interests them. It is just an illusion we have here on Earth that one moment follows another one, like beads on a string, and that once a moment is gone it is gone forever.
    When a Tralfamadorian sees a corpse, all he thinks is that the dead person is in a bad condition in that particular moment, but that the same person is just fine in plenty of other moments. Now, when I myself hear that somebody is dead, I simply shrug and say what the Tralfamadorians say about dead people, which is "so it goes.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five



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