Brian Eshleman > Brian's Quotes

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  • #1
    Helen Keller
    “The one I felt and still feel most is lack of time. I used to have time to think, to reflect, my mind and I. We would sit together of an evening and listen to the inner melodies of the spirit, which one hears only in leisure moments when the words of
    some loved poet touch a deep, sweet chord in the soul that until then had been silent. But in college there is no time to commune with one's thoughts. One goes to college to learn, it seems, not to think. When one enters the portals of learning, one leaves the dearest pleasures--solitude, books and imagination--outside with the whispering pines. I suppose I ought to find some comfort in the thought that I am laying up treasures for future enjoyment, but I am improvident enough to prefer present joy to hoarding riches against a rainy day.”
    Helen Keller, The Story of My Life

  • #2
    Shauna Niequist
    “It's not hard to decide what you want your life to be about. What's hard, she said, is figuring out what you're willing to give up in order to do the things you really care about.”
    Shauna Niequist, Bittersweet: Thoughts on Change, Grace, and Learning the Hard Way

  • #3
    W.P. Kinsella
    “I have to absorb the new season like sunlight, letting it turn my winter skin pink and then brown. I must stuff myself with lore and statistics until my fingers ooze balm.”
    W.P. Kinsella, Shoeless Joe

  • #4
    W.P. Kinsella
    “Any game becomes important when you know and love the players.”
    W.P. Kinsella, Shoeless Joe

  • #5
    Helen Keller
    “One painful duty fulfilled makes the next plainer and easier.”
    Helen Keller, The Story of My Life

  • #6
    W.P. Kinsella
    “Success is getting what you want. Happiness is wanting what you get.

    [Eddie Scissons]”
    W.P. Kinsella, Shoeless Joe

  • #7
    William Makepeace Thackeray
    “By humbly and frankly acknowledging yourself to be in the wrong, there is no knowing, my son, what good you may do. I knew once a gentleman and very worthy practitioner in Vanity Fair, who used to do little wrongs to his neighbours on purpose, and in order to apologise for them in an open and manly way afterwards—and what ensued? My friend Crocky Doyle was liked everywhere, and deemed to be rather impetuous—but the honestest fellow.”
    William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair

  • #8
    W.P. Kinsella
    “I don't have to tell you that the one constant through all the years has been baseball. America has been erased like a blackboard, only to be rebuilt and then erased again. But baseball has marked time while America has rolled by like a procession of steamrollers.”
    W.P. Kinsella, Shoeless Joe

  • #9
    Sarah Dessen
    “It seemed like this day could go in so many directions, like a spiderweb shooting out toward endless possibilities. Whenever you made a choice, especially one you'd been resisting, it always affected everything else, some in big ways, like a tremor beneath your feet, others in so tiny a shift you hardly noticed a change at all. But it was happening.”
    Sarah Dessen

  • #11
    Michael Eric Dyson
    “His dreams were the natural reflex of hope and redeemed curiosity.”
    Michael Eric Dyson, April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Death and How It Changed America

  • #13
    William Makepeace Thackeray
    “The world is a looking-glass, and gives back to every man the reflection of his own face. Frown at it, and it will in turn look sourly upon you; laugh at it and with it, and it is a jolly kind companion; and so let all young persons take their choice.”
    William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair

  • #15
    Henry Ward Beecher
    “Adversity, if for no other reason, is of benefit, since it is sure to bring a season of sober reflection. People see clearer at such times. Storms purify the atmosphere.”
    Henry Ward Beecher

  • #17
    William Makepeace Thackeray
    “Time has dealt kindly with that stout officer, as it does ordinarily with men who have good stomachs and good tempers, and are not perplexed over much by fatigue of the brain.”
    William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair

  • #21
    Sun Tzu
    “The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.”
    Sun Tzu, The Art of War

  • #22
    Sun Tzu
    “When strong, avoid them. If of high morale, depress them. Seem humble to fill them with conceit. If at ease, exhaust them. If united, separate them. Attack their weaknesses. Emerge to their surprise.”
    Sun Tzu

  • #25
    Sun Tzu
    “Thus we may know that there are five essentials for victory:
    1 He will win who knows when to fight and when not to fight.
    2 He will win who knows how to handle both superior and inferior forces.
    3 He will win whose army is animated by the same spirit throughout all its ranks.
    4 He will win who, prepared himself, waits to take the enemy unprepared.
    5 He will win who has military capacity and is not interfered with by the sovereign.”
    Sun Tzu, The Art of War

  • #26
    Sun Tzu
    “The general who advances without coveting fame and retreats without fearing disgrace, whose only thought is to protect his country and do good service for his sovereign, is the jewel of the kingdom.”
    Sun Tzu

  • #27
    Sun Tzu
    “If words of command are not clear and distinct, if orders are not thoroughly understood, then the general is to blame. But, if orders are clear and the soldiers nevertheless disobey, then it is the fault of their oficers.”
    Sun Tzu

  • #28
    Sun Tzu
    “In the practical art of war, the best thing of all is to take the enemy's country whole and intact; to shatter and destroy it is not so good. So, too, it is better to recapture an army entire than to destroy it, to capture a regiment, a detachment or a company entire than to destroy them.”
    Sun Tzu

  • #29
    Sun Tzu
    “If soldiers are punished before they have grown attached to you, they will not prove submissive;
    and, unless submissive, then will be practically useless. If, when the soldiers have become attached
    to you, punishments are not enforced, they will still be unless.”
    Sun Tzu, The Art of War

  • #30
    “I still find my corrupt heart longing for tomorrow's bread. I can make a good argument to the Lord about how effective I can be if He would supply me with enough advance funds. It's a little frightening to pray for TODAY's bread. That means I must pray again for tomorrow and believe again for tomorrow. My greedy heart is willing to be corrupted by a little bit of riches so that I see my warehouse full of loaves. I can make a good argument about how God won’t have to be bothered with me every day if He would only advance me about ten years worth of bread.”
    Gayle D. Erwin, The Yhwh Style

  • #31
    “Love is written in our instincts, yet erased by our actions.”
    Gayle D. Erwin, The Yhwh Style

  • #33
    “When the mouth cries, I want to see God, the heart has reached its finest moment. Once we have sought and seen God, all other things have a way of finding us.”
    Gayle D. Erwin, The Yhwh Style
    tags: desire

  • #33
    “The chief means of resisting manipulation is humility – knowing who we really are and facing it. You can only serve by love. You can only love by choice. True love cannot be the result of decree, force or manipulation. Jesus always kept his strength to make loving choices. He calls us to make loving choices necessary to be the servant of all." "Humility permits me to own my feelings – and to admit them. Now I'm free to say, ‘I'm angry’. I'm free to admit what I am reacting to. I am free to ask if anger is what the person wanted to produce in me, and to ask for help in changing if my reaction is inappropriate.”
    Gayle D. Erwin, The Jesus Style

  • #34
    “When I look at the clues that indicate the nature of Jesus – born in a barn, questionable parents, spotty ancestry, common name, misdirected announcement, unattractive looks, reared in a bad neighborhood, owning nothing, surrounding himself with unattractive co-workers, and dying a shameful death – I find his whole approach unable to fit into the methods that automatically come to mind when I think about “winning the world.” His whole approach could easily be described as nonthreatening or nonmanipulative. He seemed to lead with weakness in each step of life. He had nothing in the world and everything in God and the Spirit.”
    Gayle D. Erwin, The Jesus Style

  • #35
    Helen Keller
    “It was my teacher's genius, her quick sympathy, her loving tact
    which made the first years of my education so beautiful. It was
    because she seized the right moment to impart knowledge that made
    it so pleasant and acceptable to me. She realized that a child's
    mind is like a shallow brook which ripples and dances merrily
    over the stony course of its education and reflects here a
    flower, there a bush, yonder a fleecy cloud; and she attempted to
    guide my mind on its way, knowing that like a brook it should be
    fed by mountain streams and hidden springs, until it broadened
    out into a deep river, capable of reflecting in its placid
    surface, billowy hills, the luminous shadows of trees and the
    blue heavens, as well as the sweet face of a little flower.
    Any teacher can take a child to the classroom, but not every
    teacher can make him learn. He will not work joyously unless he
    feels that liberty is his, whether he is busy or at rest; he must
    feel the flush of victory and the heart-sinking of disappointment
    before he takes with a will the tasks distasteful to him and
    resolves to dance his way bravely through a dull routine of
    textbooks.
    My teacher is so near to me that I scarcely think of myself apart
    from her. How much of my delight in all beautiful things is
    innate, and how much is due to her influence, I can never tell. I
    feel that her being is inseparable from my own, and that the
    footsteps of my life are in hers. All the best of me belongs to
    her--there is not a talent, or an aspiration or a joy in me that
    has not been awakened by her loving touch.”
    Helen Keller, The Story of My Life: With Her Letters (1887 1901) and a Supplementary Account of Her Education Including Passages from the Reports and Letters of Her Teacher Anne Mansfield Sullivan by John Albert Macy

  • #36
    Helen Keller
    “I began my studies with eagerness. Before me I saw a new world opening in beauty and light, and I felt within me the capacity to know all things. In the wonderland of Mind I should be as free as another [with sight and hearing]. Its people, scenery, manners, joys, and tragedies should be living tangible interpreters of the real world. The lecture halls seemed filled with the spirit of the great and wise, and I thought the professors were the embodiment of wisdom... But I soon discovered that college was not quite the romantic lyceum I had imagined. Many of the dreams that had delighted my young inexperience became beautifully less and "faded into the light of common day." Gradually I began to find that there were disadvantages in going to college. The one I felt and still feel most is lack of time. I used to have time to think, to reflect, my mind and I. We would sit together of an evening and listen to the inner melodies of the spirit, which one hears only in leisure moments when the words of some loved poet touch a deep, sweet chord in the soul that until then had been silent. But in college there is no time to commune with one's thoughts. One goes to college to learn, it seems, not to think. When one enters the portals of learning, one leaves the dearest pleasures – solitude, books and imagination – outside with the whispering pines. I suppose I ought to find some comfort in the thought that I am laying up treasures for future enjoyment, but I am improvident enough to prefer present joy to hoarding riches against a rainy day.”
    Helen Keller, The Story of My Life: With Her Letters (1887 1901) and a Supplementary Account of Her Education Including Passages from the Reports and Letters of Her Teacher Anne Mansfield Sullivan by John Albert Macy

  • #37
    Helen Keller
    “Many scholars forget, it seems to me, that our enjoyment of the great works of literature depends more upon the depth of our sympathy than upon our understanding. The trouble is that very few of their laborious explanations stick in the memory. The mind drops them as a branch drops its overripe fruit. ... Again and again I ask impatiently, "Why concern myself with these explanations and hypotheses?" They fly hither and thither in my thought like blind birds beating the air with ineffectual wings. I do not mean to object to a thorough knowledge of the famous works we read. I object only to the interminable comments and bewildering criticisms that teach but one thing: there are as many opinions as there are men.”
    Helen Keller

  • #38
    Helen Keller
    “There are times when I long to sweep away half the things I am expected to learn; for the overtaxed mind cannot enjoy the treasure it has secured at the greatest cost. ... When one reads hurriedly and nervously, having in mind written tests and examinations, one's brain becomes encumbered with a lot of bric-a-brac for which there seems to be little use. At the present time my mind is so full of heterogeneous matter that I almost despair of ever being able to put it in order. Whenever I enter the region of my mind I feel like the proverbial bull in the china shop. A thousand odds and ends of knowledge come crashing about my head like hailstones, and when I try to escape them, theme goblins and college nixies of all sorts pursue me, until I wish – oh, may I be forgiven the wicked wish! – that I might smash the idols I came to worship.”
    Helen Keller, The Story of My Life: With Her Letters (1887 1901) and a Supplementary Account of Her Education Including Passages from the Reports and Letters of Her Teacher Anne Mansfield Sullivan by John Albert Macy

  • #39
    Helen Keller
    “Great poetry needs no interpreter other than a responsive heart.”
    Helen Keller, The Story of My Life: With Her Letters (1887 1901) and a Supplementary Account of Her Education Including Passages from the Reports and Letters of Her Teacher Anne Mansfield Sullivan by John Albert Macy



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