Molly > Molly's Quotes

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  • #1
    Jane Austen
    “The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.”
    Jane Austen


  • #2
    George Eliot
    “But I have a belief of my own, and it comforts me."

    "What is that?" said Will, rather jealous of the belief.

    "That by desiring what is perfectly good, even when we don't quite know what it is and can not do what we would, we are part of the divine struggle against evil--widening the skirts of light and making the struggle with darkness narrower.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch


  • #4
    George Eliot
    “Sane people did what their neighbours did, so that if any lunatics were at large, one might know and avoid them.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch


  • #4
    George Eliot
    “But the effect of her being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch


  • #5
    George Eliot
    “I have never done you injustice. Please remember me,” said Dorothea, repressing a rising sob.

    “Why should you say that?” said Will, with irritation. “As if I were not in danger of forgetting everything else.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch


  • #6
    Jane Austen
    “In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.”
    Jane Austen, Pride And Prejudice


  • #7
    Neal Stephenson
    “Until a man is twenty-five, he still thinks, every so often, that under the right circumstances he could be the baddest motherfucker in the world. If I moved to a martial-arts monastery in China and studied real hard for ten years. If my family was wiped out by Colombian drug dealers and I swore myself to revenge. If I got a fatal disease, had one year to live, and devoted it to wiping out street crime. If I just dropped out and devoted my life to being bad.”
    Neal Stephenson


  • #8
    David Sedaris
    “In order to get the things I want, it helps me to pretend I’m a figure in a daytime drama, a schemer. Soap opera characters make emphatic pronouncements. They ball up their fists and state their goals out loud. ‘I will destroy Buchanan Enterprises,’ they say. ‘Phoebe Wallingford will pay for what she’s done to our family.’ Walking home with the back half of the twelve-foot ladder, I turned to look in the direction of Hugh’s loft. ‘You will be mine,’ I commanded.”
    David Sedaris, Me Talk Pretty One Day


  • #9
    David Sedaris
    “In New York I'd go to the movies three or four times a week. Here I've upped it to six or seven, mainly because I'm too lazy to do anything else. Fortunately, going to the movies seems to suddenly qualify as an intellectual accomplishment, on a par with reading a book or devoting time to serious thought. It's not that the movies have gotten any more strenuous, it's just that a lot of people are as lazy as I am, and together we've agreed to lower the bar.”
    David Sedaris, Me Talk Pretty One Day


  • #10
    Charlotte Brontë
    “No sight so sad as that of a naughty child," he began, "especially a naughty little girl. Do you know where the wicked go after death?"

    "They go to hell," was my ready and orthodox answer.

    "And what is hell? Can you tell me that?"

    "A pit full of fire."

    "And should you like to fall into that pit, and to be burning there for ever?"

    "No, sir."

    "What must you do to avoid it?"

    I deliberated a moment: my answer, when it did come was objectionable: "I must keep in good health and not die.”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre


  • #11
    Charlotte Brontë
    “Do you think I am an automaton? — a machine without feelings? and can bear to have my morsel of bread snatched from my lips, and my drop of living water dashed from my cup? Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! — I have as much soul as you — and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me, as it is now for me to leave you. I am not talking to you now through the medium of custom, conventionalities, nor even of mortal flesh: it is my spirit that addresses your spirit; just as if both had passed through the grave, and we stood at God's feet, equal — as we are!”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre


  • #12
    Charlotte Brontë
    “Reader, I married him.”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre


  • #13
    Patrick Rothfuss
    “There are three things all wise men fear: the sea in storm, a night with no moon, and the anger of a gentle man.”
    Patrick Rothfuss, The Wise Man's Fear


  • #14
    Toni Morrison
    “You wanna fly, you got to give up the shit that weighs you down.”
    Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon


  • #15
    Toni Morrison
    “If you surrendered to the air, you could ride it.”
    Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon


  • #16
    Nick Hornby
    “But all three of them had had to lose things in order to gain other things. Will had lost his shell and his cool and his distance, and he felt scared and vulnerable, but he got to be with Rachel; and Fiona had lost a big chunk of Marcus, and she got to stay away from the casualty ward; and Marcus had lost himself, and got to walk home from school with his shoes on.”
    Nick Hornby, About a Boy


  • #17
    Nick Hornby
    “Will wrestled with his conscience, grappled it to the ground and sat on it until he couldn't hear a squeak out of it.”
    Nick Hornby, About a Boy


  • #18
    Neal Stephenson
    “Clearly Mr. Drkh has had a long career of being the weirdest person in any given room, but he's about to go down in flames.”
    Neal Stephenson, Cryptonomicon


  • #19
    Neal Stephenson
    “He walked straight out of college into the waiting arms of the Navy.

    They gave him an intelligence test. The first question on the math part had to do with boats on a river: Port Smith is 100 miles upstream of Port Jones. The river flows at 5 miles per hour. The boat goes through water at 10 miles per hour. How long does it take to go from Port Smith to Port Jones? How long to come back?

    Lawrence immediately saw that it was a trick question. You would have to be some kind of idiot to make the facile assumption that the current would add or subtract 5 miles per hour to or from the speed of the boat. Clearly, 5 miles per hour was nothing more than the average speed. The current would be faster in the middle of the river and slower at the banks. More complicated variations could be expected at bends in the river. Basically it was a question of hydrodynamics, which could be tackled using certain well-known systems of differential equations. Lawrence dove into the problem, rapidly (or so he thought) covering both sides of ten sheets of paper with calculations. Along the way, he realized that one of his assumptions, in combination with the simplified Navier Stokes equations, had led him into an exploration of a particularly interesting family of partial differential equations. Before he knew it, he had proved a new theorem. If that didn't prove his intelligence, what would?

    Then the time bell rang and the papers were collected. Lawrence managed to hang onto his scratch paper. He took it back to his dorm, typed it up, and mailed it to one of the more approachable math professors at Princeton, who promptly arranged for it to be published in a Parisian mathematics journal.

    Lawrence received two free, freshly printed copies of the journal a few months later, in San Diego, California, during mail call on board a large ship called the U.S.S. Nevada. The ship had a band, and the Navy had given Lawrence the job of playing the glockenspiel in it, because their testing procedures had proven that he was not intelligent enough to do anything else.”
    Neal Stephenson, Cryptonomicon


  • #20
    Maggie Stiefvater
    “I could still smell her on my fur. It clung to me, a memory of another world.

    I was drunk with it, with the scent of her. I'd got too close.

    The smell of summer on her skin, the half-recalled cadence of her voice, the sensation of her fingers on my fur. Every bit of me sang with the memory of her closeness.

    Too close.

    I couldn't stay away.”
    Maggie Stiefvater, Shiver
    tags: love


  • #21
    Susanna Clarke
    “Such nonsense!" declared Dr Greysteel. "Whoever heard of cats doing anything useful!"
    "Except for staring at one in a supercilious manner," said Strange. "That has a sort of moral usefulness, I suppose, in making one feel uncomfortable and encouraging sober reflection upon one's imperfections.”
    Susanna Clarke, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell
    tags: cats


  • #22
    Naomi Novik
    “I should rather have you than a heap of gold, even if it were very comfortable to sleep on.”
    Naomi Novik, His Majesty's Dragon


  • #23
    Naomi Novik
    “Those men want to take Laurence from me, and put him in prison, and execute him, and I will not let them, ever, and I do not care if Laurence tells me not to squash you," he added, fiercely, to Lord Barham.
    — Temeraire
    Naomi Novik, Throne of Jade


  • #24
    John Green
    “Sometimes, you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book.”
    John Green, The Fault in Our Stars


  • #25
    Naomi Novik
    “I will tell you what we shall do: if ever you need to rescue Catherine, or you Berkley, Maximus, I will help you, and you will do as much for me. Then we do not need to worry, I do not suppose anyone could stop all three of us, at least not before we can escape”
    Naomi Novik, His Majesty's Dragon


  • #26
    Naomi Novik
    “And to crown the whole, you must needs come back and make a martyr of yourself, so now anyone who cares a farthing for your life must watch you hanged; that is, if they do not decide to make a spectacle of it and draw and quarter you in the fine old style. I suppose you would go to it like Harrison, 'as cheerful as any man could do in that condition.' Well, I should not be damned cheerful, and neither should anyone else who loved you, and some of them can knock down half of London Town if they should choose.”
    Naomi Novik, Victory of Eagles


  • #27
    Kristin Cashore
    “I'm not going to wear a red dress," she said.
    "It would look stunning, My Lady," she called.
    She spoke to the bubbles gathered on the surface of the water. "If there's anyone I wish to stun at dinner, I'll hit him in the face.”
    Kristin Cashore, Graceling


  • #28
    Kristin Cashore
    “You won't even take your bow? Are you planning to throttle a moose with your bare hands, then?"
    "I've a knife in my boot," she said, and then wondered, for a moment, if she could throttle a moose with her bare hands.”
    Kristin Cashore, Graceling


  • #29
    Elizabeth Gaskell
    “I wish I could tell you how lonely I am. How cold and harsh it is here. Everywhere there is conflict and unkindness. I think God has forsaken this place. I believe I have seen hell and it's white, it's snow-white.”
    Elizabeth Gaskell, North and South


  • #30
    Sylvia Plath
    “When they asked me what I wanted to be I said I didn’t know.
    "Oh, sure you know," the photographer said.
    "She wants," said Jay Cee wittily, "to be everything.”
    Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar




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