Adrienne Agawin > Adrienne's Quotes

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  • #1
    J.D. Salinger
    “Don't ever tell anybody anything. If you do, you start missing everybody.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye


  • #2
    Nick Hornby
    “I'm not telling you that suicidal people aren't so far away from people who can get by; I'm telling you that people who can get by aren't so far away from being suicidal.”
    Nick Hornby, A Long Way Down


  • #3
    Jeffrey Eugenides
    “It didn't matter in the end how old they had been, or that they were girls, but only that we had loved them, and that they hadn't heard us calling, still do not hear us, up here in the tree house, with our thinning hair and soft bellies, calling them out of those rooms where they went to be alone for all time, alone in suicide, which is deeper than death, and where we will never find the pieces to put them back together.”
    Jeffrey Eugenides, The Virgin Suicides


  • #4
    J.D. Salinger
    “I like to be somewhere at least where you can see a few girls around once in a while, even if they're only scratching their arms or blowing their noses or even just giggling or something.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye


  • #5
    J.D. Salinger
    “It was that kind of a crazy afternoon, terrifically cold, and no sun out or anything, and you felt like you were disappearing every time you crossed a road.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye


  • #6
    J.D. Salinger
    “I don't care if it's a sad good-bye or a bad good-bye, but when I leave a place I like to know I'm leaving it. If you don't, you feel even worse.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye


  • #7
    Albert Camus
    “Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.”
    Albert Camus


  • #8
    Virginia Woolf
    “One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”
    Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own


  • #9
    Ray Bradbury
    “I don't talk things, sir,' said Faber. 'I talk the meaning of things. I sit here and know I'm alive.”
    Ray Bradbury


  • #10
    Jane Austen
    “I can listen no longer in silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach. You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever. I offer myself to you again with a heart even more your own than when you almost broke it, eight years and a half ago. Dare not say that man forgets sooner than woman, that his love has an earlier death. I have loved none but you. Unjust I may have been, weak and resentful I have been, but never inconstant. You alone have brought me to Bath. For you alone, I think and plan. Have you not seen this? Can you fail to have understood my wishes? I had not waited even these ten days, could I have read your feelings, as I think you must have penetrated mine. I can hardly write. I am every instant hearing something which overpowers me. You sink your voice, but I can distinguish the tones of that voice when they would be lost on others. Too good, too excellent creature! You do us justice, indeed. You do believe that there is true attachment and constancy among men. Believe it to be most fervent, most undeviating, in F. W.

    I must go, uncertain of my fate; but I shall return hither, or follow your party, as soon as possible. A word, a look, will be enough to decide whether I enter your father's house this evening or never.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion


  • #11
    Jane Austen
    “It isn't what we say or think that defines us, but what we do.”
    Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility


  • #12
    Jane Austen
    “It is not everyone,' said Elinor, 'who has your passion for dead leaves.”
    Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility


  • #13
    Jane Austen
    “Better be without sense than misapply it as you do. ”
    Jane Austen, Emma


  • #14
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “He smiled understandingly-much more than understandingly. It was one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal reassurance in it, that you may come across four or five times in life. It faced--or seemed to face--the whole eternal world for an instant, and then concentrated on you with an irresistible prejudice in your favor. It understood you just as far as you wanted to be understood, believed in you as you would like to believe in yourself, and assured you that it had precisely the impression of you that, at your best, you hoped to convey.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby


  • #15
    Jonathan Safran Foer
    “I told them all, "If possible, I would be here with only you, forever. But I am a man who toils, and I must go where I must. We need currency for famous nightclubs, yes? I am doing something I hate for you. This is what it means to be in love. So do not spleen me." But to be truthful, I was not even the smallest portion sad to go to Lutsk to translate for Jonathan Safran Foer. As I mentioned before, my life is ordinary. But I had never been to Lutsk, or any of the multitudinous petite villages that still endure after the war. I desired to see new things. I desired to experience volumes. And I would be electrical to meet an American.”
    Jonathan Safran Foer, Everything Is Illuminated


  • #16
    Jonathan Safran Foer
    “My friends are appeased to stay in Odessa for their entire lives. They are appeased to age like their parents, and become parents like their parents. They do not desire anything more than everything they have known. OK, but this is not for me, and it will not be for Little Igor.”
    Jonathan Safran Foer, Everything Is Illuminated


  • #17
    Jonathan Safran Foer
    “Don't you find that strange? I can't believe I never found it strange before. It's like your name, how you don't notice it for so long, but when you finally do, you can't help but say it over and over, and wonder why you never thought it was strange that you should have that name, and that everyone has been calling you that name for you whole life.”
    Jonathan Safran Foer, Everything Is Illuminated


  • #18
    Albert Camus
    “Then she said she wondered if she really loved me or not. I, of course, couldn't enlighten her as to that. And, after another silence, she murmured something about my being "a queer fellow." "And I daresay that's why I love you," she added. "But maybe that's why one day I'll come to hate you.”
    Albert Camus, The Stranger


  • #19
    Douglas Adams
    “My doctor says that I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fibre and that I am therefore excused from saving universes.”
    Douglas Adams, Life, the Universe and Everything


  • #20
    Jeffrey Eugenides
    “Biology gives you a brain. Life turns it into a mind.”
    Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex


  • #21
    Chuck Palahniuk
    “It's so quiet this high up, the feeling you get is that you're one of those space monkeys. You do the little job you're trained to do. Pull a lever. Push a button. You don't understand any of it, and then you just die.”
    Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club


  • #22
    Chuck Palahniuk
    “You buy furniture. You tell yourself, this is the last sofa I will ever need in my life. Buy the sofa, then for a couple years you're satisfied that no matter what goes wrong, at least you've got your sofa issue handled. Then the right set of dishes. Then the perfect bed. The drapes. The rug. Then you're trapped in your lovely nest, and the things you used to own, now they own you.”
    Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club


  • #23
    Chuck Palahniuk
    “A lot of young people try to impress the world and buy too many things," the doorman said.”
    Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club


  • #24
    Oscar Wilde
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.”
    Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray


  • #25
    Jack Kerouac
    “In those days he really didn't know what he was talking about; that is to say, he was a young jailkid all hung-up on the wonderful possibilities of becoming a real intellectual, and he liked to talk in the tone and using the words, but in a jumbled way, that he had heard from 'real intellectuals.”
    Jack Kerouac, On the Road


  • #26
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “I have this disease late at night sometimes, involving alcohol and the telephone. I get drunk, and I drive my wife away with a breath like mustard gas and roses. And then, speaking gravely and elegantly into the telephone, I ask the telephone operators to connect me with this friend or that one, from whom I have not heard in years.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five


  • #27
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “And I asked myself about the present: how wide it was, how deep it was, how much was mine to keep.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five




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