Patrick Todoroff > Patrick's Quotes

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  • #1
    Dorothy L. Sayers
    “In the world it is called Tolerance, but in hell it is called Despair...the sin that believes in nothing, cares for nothing, seeks to know nothing, interferes with nothing, enjoys nothing, hates nothing, finds purpose in nothing, lives for nothing, and remains alive because there is nothing for which it will die.”
    Dorothy L. Sayers


  • #2
    Neal Stephenson
    “To condense fact from the vapor of nuance.”
    Neal Stephenson, Snow Crash


  • #3
    Bruce Sterling
    “The future is unwritten. there are best case scenarios. There are worst-case scenarios. both of them are great fun to write about if you' re a science fiction novelist, but neither of them ever happens in the real world. What happens in the real world is always a sideways-case scenario. World-changing marvels to us, are only wallpaper to our children.”
    Bruce Sterling


  • #4
    Richard K. Morgan
    “The personal, as everyone’s so fucking fond of saying, is political. So if some idiot politician, some power player, tries to execute policies that harm you or those you care about, take it personally. Get angry. The Machinery of Justice will not serve you here – it is slow and cold, and it is theirs, hardware and soft-. Only the little people suffer at the hands of Justice; the creatures of power slide from under it with a wink and a grin. If you want justice, you will have to claw it from them. Make it personal. Do as much damage as you can. Get your message across. That way, you stand a better chance of being taken seriously next time. Of being considered dangerous. And make no mistake about this: being taken seriously, being considered dangerous marks the difference - the only difference in their eyes - between players and little people. Players they will make deals with. Little people they liquidate. And time and again they cream your liquidation, your displacement, your torture and brutal execution with the ultimate insult that it’s just business, it’s politics, it’s the way of the world, it’s a tough life and that it’s nothing personal. Well, fuck them. Make it personal.

    Quellcrist Falconer
    Things I Should Have Learned by Now, Volume II”
    Richard K. Morgan


  • #5
    Rudy Rucker
    “For me, the best thing about Cyberpunk is that it taught me how to enjoy shopping malls, which used to terrify me. Now I just imagine the whole thing is two miles below the moon’s surface, and that half the people’s right-brains have been eaten by roboticized steel rats. And suddenly it’s interesting again.”
    Rudy Rucker


  • #6
    Evelyn Waugh
    “Punctuality is the virtue of the bored.”
    Evelyn Waugh


  • #7
    Marcel Proust
    “Always try to keep a patch of sky above your life.”
    Marcel Proust, Swann's Way


  • #8
    W. Somerset Maugham
    “There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are.”
    W. Somerset Maugham


  • #9
    William Arthur Ward
    “The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.”
    William Arthur Ward


  • #10
    John Milton
    “Though all winds of doctrine were let loose to play upon the earth, so truth be in the field, we do injuriously by licensing and prohibiting to misdoubt her strength. Let her and falsehood grapple, who ever knew truth put to the worse, in a free and open encounter.”
    John Milton


  • #11
    William Gibson
    “Friday, August 04, 2006
    MONUMENT
    posted 8:31 AM

    Silver nitrous girls pointed into occult winds of porn and destiny.”
    William Gibson


  • #12
    William Gibson
    “His eyes were eggs of unstable crystal, vibrating with a frequency whose name was rain and the sound of trains, suddenly sprouting a humming forest of hair-fine glass spines.”
    William Gibson, Neuromancer


  • #13
    William Gibson
    “One of the liberating effects of science fiction when I was a teenager was precisely its ability to tune me into all sorts of strange data and make me realize that I wasn’t as totally isolated in perceiving the world as being monstrous and crazy”
    William Gibson


  • #14
    William Gibson
    “When you want to know how things really work, study them when they're coming apart.”
    William Gibson, Zero History


  • #15
    William Gibson
    “The future is already here – it's just not evenly distributed.

    The Economist, December 4, 2003
    William Gibson


  • #16
    Stephen Colbert
    “If this is going to be a Christian nation that doesn't help the poor, either we have to pretend that Jesus was just as selfish as we are, or we've got to acknowledge that He commanded us to love the poor and serve the needy without condition and then admit that we just don't want to do it.”
    Stephen Colbert


  • #17
    Mahatma Gandhi
    “The Roots of Violence: Wealth without work, Pleasure without conscience, Knowledge without character, Commerce without morality, Science without humanity, Worship without sacrifice, Politics without principles."

    (Young India, 22 October 1925)”
    Mahatma Gandhi


  • #18
    Rick Bragg
    “This is a place where grandmothers hold babies on their laps under the stars and whisper in their ears that the lights in the sky are holes in the floor of heaven.”
    Rick Bragg


  • #19
    Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
    “One day Dostoevsky threw out the enigmatic remark: "Beauty will save the world". What sort of a statement is that? For a long time I considered it mere words. How could that be possible? When in bloodthirsty history did beauty ever save anyone from anything? Ennobled, uplifted, yes - but whom has it saved?

    There is, however, a certain peculiarity in the essence of beauty, a peculiarity in the status of art: namely, the convincingness of a true work of art is completely irrefutable and it forces even an opposing heart to surrender. It is possible to compose an outwardly smooth and elegant political speech, a headstrong article, a social program, or a philosophical system on the basis of both a mistake and a lie. What is hidden, what distorted, will not immediately become obvious.

    Then a contradictory speech, article, program, a differently constructed philosophy rallies in opposition - and all just as elegant and smooth, and once again it works. Which is why such things are both trusted and mistrusted.

    In vain to reiterate what does not reach the heart.

    But a work of art bears within itself its own verification: conceptions which are devised or stretched do not stand being portrayed in images, they all come crashing down, appear sickly and pale, convince no one. But those works of art which have scooped up the truth and presented it to us as a living force - they take hold of us, compel us, and nobody ever, not even in ages to come, will appear to refute them.

    So perhaps that ancient trinity of Truth, Goodness and Beauty is not simply an empty, faded formula as we thought in the days of our self-confident, materialistic youth? If the tops of these three trees converge, as the scholars maintained, but the too blatant, too direct stems of Truth and Goodness are crushed, cut down, not allowed through - then perhaps the fantastic, unpredictable, unexpected stems of Beauty will push through and soar to that very same place, and in so doing will fulfil the work of all three?

    In that case Dostoevsky's remark, "Beauty will save the world", was not a careless phrase but a prophecy? After all he was granted to see much, a man of fantastic illumination.

    And in that case art, literature might really be able to help the world today?”
    Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Nobel Lecture


  • #20
    Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
    “Bless you prison, bless you for being in my life. For there, lying upon the rotting prison straw, I came to realize that the object of life is not prosperity as we are made to believe, but the maturity of the human soul.”
    Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, The Gulag Archipelago 1918-1956


  • #21
    Thomas Jefferson
    “Whereas it appeareth that however certain forms of government are better calculated than others to protect individuals in the free exercise of their natural rights, and are at the same time themselves better guarded against degeneracy, yet experience hath shewn, that even under the best forms, those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny; and it is believed that the most effectual means of preventing this would be, to illuminate, as far as practicable, the minds of the people at large, ....whence it becomes expedient for promoting the publick happiness that those persons, whom nature hath endowed with genius and virtue, should be rendered by liberal education worthy to receive, and able to guard the sacred deposit of the rights and liberties of their fellow citizens, and that they should be called to that charge without regard to wealth, birth or accidental condition of circumstance.”
    Thomas Jefferson, Jefferson: Writings


  • #22
    Jay Leno
    “The Supreme Court has ruled that they cannot have a nativity scene in Washington, D.C. This wasn't for any religious reasons. They couldn't find three wise men and a virgin.”
    Jay Leno


  • #23
    Jarod Kintz

  • #24
    Graham Greene
    “How often the priest had heard the same confession--Man was so limited: he hadn't even the ingenuity to invent a new vice: the animals knew as much. It was for this world that Christ had died: the more evil you saw and heard about you, the greater the glory lay around the death; it was too easy to die for what was good or beautiful, for home or children or civilization--it needed a God to die for the half-hearted and the corrupt.”
    Graham Greene, The Power and the Glory


  • #25
    Christopher Moore
    “It’s sarcasm, Josh.”

    “Sarcasm?”

    “It’s from the Greek, sarkasmos. To bite the lips. It means that you aren’t really saying what you mean, but people will get your point. I invented it, Bartholomew named it.”

    “Well, if the village idiot named it, I’m sure it’s a good thing.”

    “There you go, you got it.”

    “Got what?”

    “Sarcasm.”

    “No, I meant it.”

    “Sure you did.”

    “Is that sarcasm?”

    “Irony, I think.”

    “What’s the difference?”

    “I haven’t the slightest idea.”

    “So you’re being ironic now, right?”

    “No, I really don’t know.”

    “Maybe you should ask the idiot.”

    “Now you’ve got it.”

    “What?”

    “Sarcasm.”
    Christopher Moore, Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal


  • #26
    William Gibson
    “The present tense made him nervous.”
    William Gibson


  • #27
    William Gibson
    “There must be some Tommy Hilfiger event horizon, beyond which it is impossible to be more derivative, more removed from the source, more devoid of soul.”
    William Gibson, Pattern Recognition


  • #28
    William Gibson
    “Addictions [...] started out like magical pets, pocket monsters. They did extraordinary tricks, showed you things you hadn't seen, were fun. But came, through some gradual dire alchemy, to make decisions for you. Eventually, they were making your most crucial life-decisions. And they were [...] less intelligent than goldfish.”
    William Gibson, Zero History


  • #29
    A.W. Tozer
    “Any faith that does not command the one who holds it is not a real belief; it is a pseudo belief only. And it might shock some of us profoundly if we were brought suddenly face to face with our beliefs and forced to test them in the fires of practical living.”
    A.W. Tozer, The Root of the Righteous


  • #30
    Muriel Barbery
    “We never look beyond our assumptions and what's worse, we have given up trying to meet others; we just meet ourselves.”
    Muriel Barbery




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