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  • #1
    Jane Austen
    “In such cases as this, it is, I believe, the established mode to express a sense of obligation for the sentiments avowed, however unequally they may be returned. It is natural that obligation should be felt, and if I could feel gratitude, I would now thank you. But I cannot–I have never desired your good opinion, and you have certainly bestowed it most unwillingly. I am sorry to have occasioned pain to anyone. It has been most unconsciously done, however, and I hope will be of short duration. The feelings which, you tell me, have long prevented the acknowledgment of your regard, can have little difficulty in overcoming it after this explanation.”

    Mr. Darcy, who was leaning against the mantelpiece with his eyes fixed on her face, seemed to catch her words with no less resentment than surprise. His complexion became pale with anger, and the disturbance of his mind was visible in every feature. He was struggling for the appearance of composure, and would not open his lips till he believed himself to have attained it. The pause was to Elizabeth’s feelings dreadful. At length, with a voice of forced calmness, he said:

    And this is all the reply which I am to have the honour of expecting! I might, perhaps, wish to be informed why, with so little endeavour at civility, I am thus rejected. But it is of small importance.”

    I might as well inquire,” replied she, “why with so evident a desire of offending and insulting me, you chose to tell me that you liked me against your will, against your reason, and even against your character? Was not this some excuse for incivility, if I was uncivil?”
    Jane Austen

  • #2
    Jane Austen
    “There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends. I have no notion of loving people by halves, it is not my nature.”
    Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey

  • #3
    Jane Austen
    “A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #4
    Jane Austen
    “The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!”
    Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility

  • #5
    Jane Austen
    “I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #6
    Jane Austen
    “A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of.”
    Jane Austen, Mansfield Park

  • #7
    Jane Austen
    “I must learn to be content with being happier than I deserve.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #8
    Jane Austen
    “It sometimes happens that a woman is handsomer at twenty-nine than she was ten years before.”
    Jane Austen

  • #9
    Jane Austen
    “In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.”
    Jane Austen, Pride And Prejudice

  • #10
    Jane Austen
    “From the very beginning— from the first moment, I may almost say— of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of the feelings of others, were such as to form the groundwork of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #11
    Jane Austen
    “I have been a selfish being all my life, in practice, though not in principle. As a child I was taught what was right, but I was not taught to correct my temper. I was given good principles, but left to follow them in pride and conceit. Unfortunately an only son (for many years an only child), I was spoilt by my parents, who, though good themselves (my father, particularly, all that was benevolent and amiable), allowed, encouraged, almost taught me to be selfish and overbearing; to care for none beyond my own family circle; to think meanly of all the rest of the world; to wish at least to think meanly of their sense and worth compared with my own. Such I was, from eight to eight and twenty; and such I might still have been but for you, dearest, loveliest Elizabeth! What do I not owe you! You taught me a lesson, hard indeed at first, but most advantageous. By you, I was properly humbled. I came to you without a doubt of my reception. You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #12
    Jane Austen
    “Obstinate, headstrong girl!”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice



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