Ken Moten > Ken's Quotes

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  • #1
    Ralph Ellison
    “What and how much had I lost by trying to do only what was expected of me instead of what I myself had wished to do?”
    Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man

  • #2
    Ralph Ellison
    “Life is to be lived, not controlled; and humanity is won by continuing to play in face of certain defeat.”
    Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man

  • #3
    Ralph Ellison
    “I was never more hated than when I tried to be honest. Or when, even as just now I've tried to articulate exactly what I felt to be the truth. No one was satisfied”
    Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man

  • #4
    Ralph Ellison
    “And my problem was that I always tried to go in everyone's way but my own.”
    Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man

  • #5
    Ralph Ellison
    “Perhaps everyone loved someone; I didn't now, I couldn't give much thought to love; in order to travel far you had to be detached, and I had the long road back to the campus before me.”
    Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man

  • #6
    T.S. Eliot
    “What have we given?
    My friend, blood shaking my heart
    The awful daring of a moment's surrender
    Which an age of prudence can never retract
    By this, and this only, we have existed.”
    T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land

  • #7
    Dorothy L. Sayers
    “Even idiots ocasionally speak the truth accidentally.”
    Dorothy L. Sayers, Whose Body?

  • #8
    Dorothy L. Sayers
    “The great advantage about telling the truth is that nobody ever believes it.”
    Dorothy L. Sayers

  • #9
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.”
    Søren Kierkegaard

  • #10
    William Shakespeare
    “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.”
    William Shakespeare, As You Like It

  • #11
    Socrates
    “The unexamined life is not worth living.”
    Socrates

  • #12
    Confucius
    “By three methods we may learn wisdom: First, by reflection, which is noblest; Second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third by experience, which is the bitterest.”
    Confucius

  • #13
    W.H. Auden
    “You shall love your crooked neighbour, with your crooked heart.”
    W.H. Auden

  • #14
    W.H. Auden
    “Thank God for books as an alternative to conversation.”
    W.H. Auden

  • #15
    W.H. Auden
    “A real book is not one that we read, but one that reads us. ”
    W.H. Auden
    tags: book

  • #16
    Mark Twain
    “If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything.”
    Mark Twain

  • #17
    Mark Twain
    “I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.”
    Mark Twain

  • #18
    Markus Herz
    “Be careful about reading health books. Some fine day you'll die of a misprint.”
    Markus Herz

  • #19
    Mark Twain
    “′Classic′ - a book which people praise and don't read.”
    Mark Twain

  • #20
    Mark Twain
    “But who prays for Satan? Who, in eighteen centuries, has had the common humanity to pray for the one sinner that needed it most?”
    Mark Twain

  • #21
    Eugene O'Neill
    “LARRY--(with increasing bitter intensity, more as if he were fighting with himself than with Hickey) I'm afraid to live, am I?--and even more afraid to die! So I sit here, with my pride drowned on the bottom of a bottle, keeping drunk so I won't see myself shaking in my britches with fright, or hear myself whining and praying: Beloved Christ, let me live a little longer at any price! If it's only for a few days more, or a few hours even, have mercy, Almighty God, and let me still clutch greedily to my yellow heart this sweet treasure, this jewel beyond price, the dirty, stinking bit of withered old flesh which is my beautiful little life! (He laughs with a sneering, vindictive self-loathing, staring inward at himself with contempt and hatred. Then abruptly he makes Hickey again the antagonist.) You think you'll make me admit that to myself?”
    Eugene O'Neill, The Iceman Cometh

  • #22
    William Shakespeare
    “Signior Antonio, many a time and oft In the Rialto you have rated me About my moneys and my usances; Still have I borne it with a patient shrug, For suff’rance is the badge of all our tribe; You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog, And spet upon my Jewish gaberdine, And all for use of that which is mine own. Well then, it now appears you need my help; Go to, then; you come to me, and you say ‘Shylock, we would have moneys.’ You say so: You that did void your rheum upon my beard, And foot me as you spurn a stranger cur Over your threshold; moneys is your suit. What should I say to you? Should I not say ‘Hath a dog money? Is it possible A cur can lend three thousand ducats?’ Or Shall I bend low and, in a bondman’s key, With bated breath and whisp’ring humbleness, Say this:— ‘Fair sir, you spit on me on Wednesday last; You spurn’d me such a day; another time You call’d me dog; and for these courtesies I’ll lend you thus much moneys?”
    William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice

  • #23
    William Shakespeare
    “The quality of mercy is not strained.
    It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
    Upon the place beneath. It is twice blessed:
    It blesseth him that gives and him that takes.
    'Tis mightiest in the mightiest. It becomes
    The thronèd monarch better than his crown.
    His scepter shows the force of temporal power,
    The attribute to awe and majesty
    Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings,
    But mercy is above this sceptered sway.
    It is enthronèd in the hearts of kings.
    It is an attribute to God himself.
    And earthly power doth then show likest God’s
    When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew, Though justice be thy plea, consider this-
    That in the course of justice none of us
    Should see salvation. We do pray for mercy,
    And that same prayer doth teach us all to render
    The deeds of mercy. I have spoke thus much
    To mitigate the justice of thy plea,
    Which if thou follow, this strict court of Venice
    Must needs give sentence 'gainst the merchant there.”
    William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice

  • #24
    Peter De Vries
    “Everybody hates me because I'm so universally liked.”
    Peter De Vries

  • #26
    Oscar Wilde
    “Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.”
    Oscar Wilde

  • #27
    Oscar Wilde
    “Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future.”
    Oscar Wilde

  • #28
    Malcolm X
    “Ignorance of each other is what has made unity impossible in the past. Therefore we need enlightenment. We need more light about each other. Light creates understanding, understanding creates love, love creates patience, and patience creates unity. Once we have more knowledge (light) about each other, we will stop condemning each other and a United front will be brought about.”
    Malcolm X

  • #29
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “Anxiety is the dizziness of freedom.”
    Søren Kierkegaard, The Concept of Anxiety: A Simple Psychologically Orienting Deliberation on the Dogmatic Issue of Hereditary Sin

  • #30
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use.”
    Søren Kierkegaard

  • #31
    Robert Benchley
    “The surest way to make a monkey of a man is to quote him.”
    Robert Benchley, My Ten Years in a Quandary and How They Grew



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