Carolyn > Carolyn's Quotes

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  • #1
    Bernard M. Baruch
    “Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind.”
    Bernard M. Baruch


  • #2
    Dr. Seuss
    “You know you're in love when you can't fall asleep because reality is finally better than your dreams.”
    Dr. Seuss


  • #3
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    “To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.”
    Ralph Waldo Emerson


  • #4
    Eleanor Roosevelt
    “A woman is like a tea bag; you never know how strong it is until it's in hot water.”
    Eleanor Roosevelt


  • #5
    Oscar Wilde
    “Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.”
    Oscar Wilde


  • #6
    Maya Angelou
    “I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”
    Maya Angelou


  • #7
    Jim Henson
    “[Kids] don't remember what you try to teach them. They remember what you are.”
    Jim Henson, It's Not Easy Being Green: And Other Things to Consider


  • #8
    W.B. Yeats
    “Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.”
    W.B. Yeats


  • #9
    W.B. Yeats
    “Come away, O human child!
    To the waters and the wild
    With a faery, hand in hand,
    For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.”
    W.B. Yeats, The Collected Poems


  • #10
    W.B. Yeats
    “A mermaid found a swimming lad,
    Picked him up for her own,
    Pressed her body to his body,
    Laughed; and plunging down
    Forgot in cruel happiness
    That even lovers drown.”
    W.B. Yeats


  • #11
    W.B. Yeats
    “I bring you with reverent hands
    The books of my numberless dreams.”
    W.B. Yeats


  • #12
    W.B. Yeats
    “How many loved your moments of glad grace,
    And loved your beauty with love false or true;
    But one man loved the pilgrim soul in you,
    And loved the sorrows of your changing face.”
    W.B. Yeats, The Collected Poems


  • #13
    W.B. Yeats
    “Think like a wise man but communicate in the language of the people.”
    W.B. Yeats


  • #14
    W.B. Yeats
    “The world is full of magic things, patiently waiting for our senses to grow sharper.”
    W.B. Yeats


  • #15
    W.B. Yeats
    “I whispered, 'I am too young,' and then, 'I am old enough'; wherefore I threw a penny to find out if I might love.”
    W.B. Yeats, The Collected Poems


  • #16
    W.B. Yeats
    “...I'm looking for the face I had, before the world was made...”
    W.B. Yeats


  • #17
    W.B. Yeats
    “There is another world, but it is in this one.”
    W.B. Yeats


  • #18
    W.B. Yeats
    “For he would be thinking of love
    Till the stars had run away
    And the shadows eaten the moon.”
    W.B. Yeats, Selected Poems and Four Plays


  • #19
    W.B. Yeats
    “If I make the lashes dark
    And the eyes more bright
    And the lips more scarlet,
    Or ask if all be right
    From mirror after mirror,
    No vanity's displayed:
    I'm looking for the face I had
    Before the world was made.”
    W.B. Yeats


  • #20
    “If what I say resonates with you, it is merely because we are both branches of the same tree.”
    ― WB Yeats


  • #21
    W.B. Yeats
    “Brown Penny

    I WHISPERED, 'I am too young,'
    And then, 'I am old enough';
    Wherefore I threw a penny
    To find out if I might love.
    'Go and love, go and love, young man,
    If the lady be young and fair.'
    Ah, penny, brown penny, brown penny,
    I am looped in the loops of her hair.
    O love is the crooked thing,
    There is nobody wise enough
    To find out all that is in it,
    For he would be thinking of love
    Till the stars had run away
    And the shadows eaten the moon.
    Ah, penny, brown penny, brown penny,
    One cannot begin it too soon.”
    W.B. Yeats
    tags: love


  • #22
    W.B. Yeats
    “That beautiful mild woman for whose sake
    There's many a one shall find out all heartache
    On finding that her voice is sweet and low
    Replied, 'To be born a woman is to know-
    Although they do not talk of it at school -
    That we must labor to be beautiful.”
    W.B. Yeats


  • #23
    W.B. Yeats
    “Hope and Memory have one daughter and her name is Art, and she has built her dwelling far from the desperate field where men hang out their garments upon forked boughs to be banners of battle. O beloved daughter of Hope and Memory, be with me for a while.”
    W.B. Yeats


  • #24
    W.B. Yeats
    “We can make our minds so like still water that beings gather about us that they may see, it may be, their own images, and so live for a moment with a clearer, perhaps even with a fiercer life because of our quiet.”
    W.B. Yeats


  • #25
    W.B. Yeats
    “Let us go forth, the tellers of tales, and seize whatever prey the heart long for, and have no fear. Everything exists, everything is true, and the earth is only a little dust under our feet.”
    W.B. Yeats


  • #26
    W.B. Yeats
    “God guard me from those thoughts men think
    In the mind alone.”
    W.B. Yeats, The Collected Poems


  • #27
    W.B. Yeats
    “Is it not certain that the Creator yawns in earthquake and thunder and other popular displays, but toils in rounding the delicate spiral of a shell?

    -Yeats, The Trembling of the Veil”
    W.B. Yeats


  • #28
    W.B. Yeats
    “One should say before sleeping: I have lived many lives. I have been a slave and a prince. Many a beloved has sat upon my knee and I have sat upon the knees of many a beloved. Everything that has been shall be again.”
    W.B. Yeats


  • #29
    W.B. Yeats

  • #30
    W.B. Yeats
    “THE STOLEN CHILD

    Where dips the rocky highland
    Of Sleuth Wood in the lake,
    There lies a leafy island
    Where flapping herons wake
    The drowsy water rats;
    There we've hid our faery vats,
    Full of berrys
    And of reddest stolen cherries.
    Come away, O human child!
    To the waters and the wild
    With a faery, hand in hand,
    For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

    Where the wave of moonlight glosses
    The dim gray sands with light,
    Far off by furthest Rosses
    We foot it all the night,
    Weaving olden dances
    Mingling hands and mingling glances
    Till the moon has taken flight;
    To and fro we leap
    And chase the frothy bubbles,
    While the world is full of troubles
    And anxious in its sleep.
    Come away, O human child!
    To the waters and the wild
    With a faery, hand in hand,
    For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

    Where the wandering water gushes
    From the hills above Glen-Car,
    In pools among the rushes
    That scarce could bathe a star,
    We seek for slumbering trout
    And whispering in their ears
    Give them unquiet dreams;
    Leaning softly out
    From ferns that drop their tears
    Over the young streams.
    Come away, O human child!
    To the waters and the wild
    With a faery, hand in hand,
    For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

    Away with us he's going,
    The solemn-eyed:
    He'll hear no more the lowing
    Of the calves on the warm hillside
    Or the kettle on the hob
    Sing peace into his breast,
    Or see the brown mice bob
    Round and round the oatmeal chest.
    For he comes, the human child,
    To the waters and the wild
    With a faery, hand in hand,
    For the world's more full of weeping than he can understand.”
    W.B. Yeats, Crossways




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