Gaurav > Gaurav's Quotes

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  • #1
    Douglas Adams
    “The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don't.”
    Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

  • #2
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “O Elbereth! Gilthoniel!
    We still remember, we who dwell
    In this far land beneath the trees.
    Thy starlight on the Western Seas.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring
    tags: elves

  • #3
    “I think we mistake sadness for depression, because life is basically sad, and its the failure to recognize that that leads to this sort of resentment and bewilderment [...] It is, it is, and [..] you know, people just suddenly think that the world owes it to them to be happy, and they're not happy and then they think well, why aren't I happy, and makes 'em angry and then they're depressed about the fact that they're angry and they're bitter about the fact that they're depressed, and this downward cycle; why don't they just accept that life is sad and cheer up, it's not forever.”
    Jeremy Hardy

  • #4
    Ernest Hemingway
    “If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.”
    Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms

  • #5
    Douglas Adams
    “I love deadlines. I love the whooshing noise they make as they go by.”
    Douglas Adams, The Salmon of Doubt

  • #6
    Mahatma Gandhi
    “Freedom is not worth having if it does not include the freedom to make mistakes.”
    Mahatma Gandhi

  • #7
    Mahatma Gandhi
    “To believe in something, and not to live it, is dishonest.”
    Mahatma Gandhi

  • #8
    Mahatma Gandhi
    “(When asked what he thought of Western civilization): 'I think it would be a good idea.”
    Mahatma Gandhi

  • #9
    Douglas Adams
    “The story so far:
    In the beginning the Universe was created.
    This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.”
    Douglas Adams, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe

  • #10
    Douglas Adams
    “There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable.

    There is another theory which states that this has already happened.”
    Douglas Adams, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe

  • #11
    Douglas Adams
    “Don't Panic.”
    Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

  • #12
    Douglas Adams
    “Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?”
    Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

  • #13
    “A customer is the most important visitor on our premises. He is not dependent on us. We are dependent on him. He is not an interruption in our work. He is the purpose of it. He is not an outsider in our business. He is part of it. We are not doing him a favor by serving him. He is doing us a favor by giving us an opportunity to do so.”
    Kenneth B. Elliott

  • #14
    Qiu Xiaolong
    “The wind languished. The floral curtain ceased flapping. The moonlight streamed through, lighting up her face. It was a young, animated face. At that moment, it touched a string, a peg, deep inside him.”
    Qiu Xiaolong

  • #15
    “One way of emphasizing the singularity of the recent past is [..] to observe that the total number of humans ever to have lived is estimated at around (a bit less than) 100 billion. One of Walt Whitman's poems has a memorable image—thinking of all past people lined up in orderly columns behind those living—‘row upon row rise the phantoms behind us’. Actually, looking over our shoulder, we would see only around 15 rows.”
    Robert M. May

  • #16
    Harold Bloom
    “[José] Saramago for the last 25 years stood his own with any novelist of the Western world [..] He was the equal of Philip Roth, Gunther Grass, Thomas Pynchon and Don DeLillo. His genius was remarkably versatile — he was at once a great comic and a writer of shocking earnestness and grim poignancy. It is hard to believe he will not survive.”
    Harold Bloom

  • #17
    “Every time you think about settling on a more mundane question to answer, or reducing your sample size, or skipping an experiment that would strengthen your interpretation, remember that reviewers and editors of the major journals are looking for the small minority of papers that stand out from the rest.”
    John N. Thompson

  • #18
    Molière
    “Writing is like prostitution. First you do it for love, and then for a few close friends, and then for money.”
    Molière

  • #19
    Zadie Smith
    Please. Do me this one, great favor, Jones. If ever you hear anyone, when you are back home...if ever you hear anyone speak of the East," and here his voice plummeted a register, and the tone was full and sad, "hold your judgment. If you are told 'they are all this' or 'they do this' or 'their opinions are these,' withhold your judgment until all the facts are upon you. Because that land they call 'India' goes by a thousand names and is populated by millions, and if you think you have found two men the same among that multitude, then you are mistaken. It is merely a trick of the moonlight.”
    Zadie Smith, White Teeth

  • #20
    Zadie Smith
    “She knows what it means. Oh, wonderfully bright at 6 a.m., yes, wonderfully clear for an hour. But the shorter the days, the longer the nights, the darker the house, the easier it is, the easier it is, the easier it is, to mistake a shadow for the writing on the wall, the sound of overland footsteps for the distant crack of thunder, and the midnight chime of a New Year clock for the bell that tolls the end of the world.”
    Zadie Smith, White Teeth

  • #21
    “From year to year, and from age to age, we see [biologists] at work, adding no doubt much to the unknown, and advancing many important interests, but, at the same time, doing little for the establishment of comprehensive views of nature. Experiments in however narrow a walk, facts of whatever minuteness, make reputations in scientific societies; all beyond is regarded with suspicion and distrust.”
    Robert Chambers

  • #22
    Marcus Aurelius
    “Do not act as if you were going to live ten thousand years. Death hangs over you. While you live, while it is in your power, be good.”
    Marcus Aurelius

  • #23
    Aristotle
    “And further, observing that all this indeterminate substance is in motion, and that no true predication can be made of that which changes, they supposed that it is impossible to make any true statement about that which is in all ways and entirely changeable. For it was from this supposition that there blossomed forth the most extreme view of those which we have mentioned, that of the professed followers of Heraclitus, and such as Cratylus held, who ended by thinking that one need not say anything, and only moved his finger; and who criticized Heraclitus for saying that one cannot enter the same river twice, for he himself held that it cannot be done even once.”
    Aristotle

  • #24
    Charles Dickens
    “Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation of the first link on one memorable day.”
    Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

  • #25
    Chaim Potok
    “Human beings do not live forever, Reuven. We live less than the time it takes to blink an eye, if we measure our lives against eternity. So it may be asked what value is there to a human life. There is so much pain in the world. What does it mean to have to suffer so much if our lives are nothing more than the blink of an eye?

    I learned a long time ago, Reuven, that a blink of an eye in itself is nothing. But the eye that blinks, that is something. A span of life is nothing. But the man who lives that span, he is something. He can fill that tiny span with meaning, so its quality is immeasurable though its quantity may be insignificant. Do you understand what I am saying? A man must fill his life with meaning, meaning is not automatically given to life.

    It is hard work to fill one's life with meaning. That I do not think you understand yet. A life filled with meaning is worthy of rest. I want to be worthy of rest when I am no longer here.”
    Chaim Potok, The Chosen

  • #26
    Fernando Pessoa
    “To write is to forget. Literature is the most agreeable way of ignoring life. Music soothes, the visual arts exhilarates, the performing arts (such as acting and dance) entertain. Literature, however, retreats from life by turning in into slumber. The other arts make no such retreat— some because they use visible and hence vital formulas, others because they live from human life itself.
    This isn't the case with literature. Literature stimulates life. A novel is a story of what never was, a play is a novel without narration. A poem is the expression of ideas or feelings a language no one uses, because no one talks in verse.”
    Fernando Pessoa, The Book of Disquiet

  • #27
    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
    “If any man wish to write in a clear style, let him be first clear in his thoughts; and if any would write in a noble style, let him first possess a noble soul.”
    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

  • #28
    Vladimir Nabokov
    “It was love at first sight, at last sight, at ever and ever sight.”
    Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

  • #29
    Vladimir Nabokov
    “Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta. She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock. She was Lola in slacks. She was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always Lolita. Did she have a precursor? She did, indeed she did. In point of fact, there might have been no Lolita at all had I not loved, one summer, an initial girl-child. In a princedom by the sea. Oh when? About as many years before Lolita was born as my age was that summer. You can always count on a murderer for a fancy prose style. Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, exhibit number one is what the seraphs, the misinformed, simple, noble-winged seraphs, envied. Look at this tangle of thorns.”
    Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

  • #30
    Vladimir Nabokov
    “And the rest is rust and stardust.”
    Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita



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