David > David's Quotes

(showing 1-30 of 55)
« previous 1
sort by

  • #1
    Lao Tzu
    “Do you have the patience to wait
    Till your mud settles and the water is clear?
    Can you remain unmoving
    Till the right action arises by itself?”
    Lao Tzu

  • #2
    Albert Camus
    “She was wearing a pair of my pajamas with the sleeves rolled up. When she laughed I wanted her again. A minute later she asked me if I loved her. I told her it didn't mean anything but that I didn't think so. She looked sad. But as we were fixing lunch, and for no apparent reason, she laughed in such a way that I kissed her.”
    Albert Camus, The Stranger

  • #3
    David Foster Wallace
    “The so-called ‘psychotically depressed’ person who tries to kill herself doesn’t do so out of quote ‘hopelessness’ or any abstract conviction that life’s assets and debits do not square. And surely not because death seems suddenly appealing. The person in whom Its invisible agony reaches a certain unendurable level will kill herself the same way a trapped person will eventually jump from the window of a burning high-rise. Make no mistake about people who leap from burning windows. Their terror of falling from a great height is still just as great as it would be for you or me standing speculatively at the same window just checking out the view; i.e. the fear of falling remains a constant. The variable here is the other terror, the fire’s flames: when the flames get close enough, falling to death becomes the slightly less terrible of two terrors. It’s not desiring the fall; it’s terror of the flames. And yet nobody down on the sidewalk, looking up and yelling ‘Don’t!’ and ‘Hang on!’, can understand the jump. Not really. You’d have to have personally been trapped and felt flames to really understand a terror way beyond falling.”
    David Foster Wallace

  • #4
    Voltaire
    “Clearly,” I said, “we should choose not to have good sense, if that good sense contributes to our misery.”

    Everyone agreed with me, and yet I found no one who wanted to accept the bargain of becoming ignorant in order to become content. From this I concluded that though we greatly value happiness, we place even greater value on reason.

    But yet, upon reflection, it seems that to prefer reason to happiness is to be quite insane.”
    Voltaire

  • #5
    Arthur Schopenhauer
    “One can never read too little of bad, or too much of good books: bad books are intellectual poison; they destroy the mind.

    In order to read what is good one must make it a condition never to read what is bad; for life is short, and both time and strength limited.”
    Arthur Schopenhauer, Essays and Aphorisms

  • #6
    Gore Vidal
    “Write something, even if it's just a suicide note. ”
    Gore Vidal

  • #7
    Heraclitus
    “No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man.”
    Heraclitus

  • #8
    Willem Frederik Hermans
    “Wie niet helemaal bereikt wat hij bereiken wil, raakt niet los van de vraag, of hij niet beter elke moeite iets te bereiken zou kunnen opgeven, in plaats van te doen of iets anders bereiken hem kan troosten voor het feit dat hij niet bereikt heeft, wat hij oorspronkelijk wou.”
    Willem Frederik Hermans, Au Pair

  • #9
    “Nothing exists; even if something exists, nothing can be known about it; and even if something can be known about it, knowledge about it can't be communicated to others.”
    Gorgias

  • #10
    Friedrich Nietzsche
    “Today as always, men fall into two groups: slaves and free men. Whoever does not have two-thirds of his day for himself, is a slave, whatever he may be: a statesman, a businessman, an official, or a scholar.”
    Friedrich Nietzsche

  • #11
    Roland Barthes
    “We know that to give writing its future, it is necessary to overthrow the myth: the birth of the reader must be at the cost of the death of the Author.”
    Roland Barthes

  • #12
    David Foster Wallace
    “Modern party-dance is simply writhing to suggestive music. It is ridiculous, silly to watch and excruciatingly embarrassing to perform. It is ridiculous, and yet absolutely everyone does it, so that it is the person who does not want to do the ridiculous thing who feels out of place and uncomfortable and self-conscious . . . in a word, ridiculous. Right out of Kafka: the person who does not want to do the ridiculous thing is the person who is ridiculous. [...] Modern party-dance is an evil thing.”
    David Foster Wallace, The Broom of the System

  • #13
    Lewis Carroll
    “I can't go back to yesterday because I was a different person then.”
    Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland

  • #14
    Richard Yates
    “Now you’ve said it. The hopeless emptiness. Hell, plenty of people are on to the emptiness part; out where I used to work, on the Coast, that’s all we ever talked about. We’d sit around talking about emptiness all night. Nobody ever said ‘hopeless,’ though; that’s where we’d chicken out. Because maybe it does take a certain amount of guts to see the emptiness, but it takes a whole hell of a lot more to see the hopelessness. And I guess when you do see the hopelessness, that’s when there’s nothing to do but take off. If you can”
    Richard Yates, Revolutionary Road

  • #15
    Ibn Arabi
    “Deliver us, O Allah, from the Sea of Names.”
    Ibn Arabi

  • #16
    Richard Yates
    “In avoiding specific goals he had avoided specific limitations. For the time being the world, life itself, could be his chosen field.”
    Richard Yates, Revolutionary Road

  • #17
    Marcel Proust
    “Desire makes everything blossom; possession makes everything wither and fade. ”
    Marcel Proust

  • #18
    Marcel Proust
    “...the memory of a particular image is but regret for a particular moment..”
    Marcel Proust, In Search of Lost Time

  • #19
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “I never asked to be born in the first place.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Timequake

  • #20
    J.D. Salinger
    “Anyway, I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody's around - nobody big, I mean - except me. And I'm standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff - I mean if they're running and they don't look where they're going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That's all I do all day. I'd just be the catcher in the rye and all. I know it's crazy, but that's the only thing I'd really like to be.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #21
    David Foster Wallace
    “Who are we to say getting incested or abused or violated or any of those things can’t have their positive aspects in the long run? … You have to be careful of taking a knee-jerk attitude. Having a knee-jerk attitude to anything is a mistake, especially in the case of women, where it adds up to this very limited and condescending thing of saying they’re fragile, breakable things that can be destroyed easily. Everybody gets hurt and violated and broken sometimes. Why are women so special? Not that anybody ought to be raped or abused, nobody’s saying that, but that’s what is going on. What about afterwards? All I’m saying is there are certain cases where it can enlarge you or make you more of a complete human being, like Viktor Frankl. Think about the Holocaust. Was the Holocaust a good thing? No way. Does anybody think it was good that it happened? No, of course not. But did you read Viktor Frankl? Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning? It’s a great, great book, but it comes out of his experience. It’s about his experience in the human dark side. Now think about it, if there was no Holocaust, there’d be no Man’s Search for Meaning… . Think about it. Think about being degraded and brought within an inch of your life, for example. No one’s gonna say the sick bastards who did it shouldn’t be put in jail, but let’s put two things into perspective here. One is, afterwards she knows something about herself that she never knew before. What she knows is that the most totally terrible terrifying thing that she could ever have imagined happening to her has now happened, and she survived. She’s still here, and now she knows something. I mean she really, really knows. Look, totally terrible things happen… . Existence in life breaks people in all kinds of awful fucking ways all the time, trust me I know. I’ve been there. And this is the big difference, you and me here, cause this isn’t about politics or feminism or whatever, for you this is just ideas, you’ve never been there. I’m not saying nothing bad has ever happened to you, you’re not bad looking, I’m sure there’s been some sort of degradation or whatever come your way in life, but I’m talking Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning type violation and terror and suffering here. The real dark side. I can tell from just looking at you, you never. You wouldn’t even wear what you’re wearing, trust me.
    What if I told you it was my own sister that was raped? What if I told you a little story about a sixteen-year-old girl who went to the wrong party with the wrong guy and four of his buddies that ended up doing to her just about everything four guys could do to you in terms of violation? But if you could ask her if she could go into her head and forget it or like erase the tape of it happening in her memory, what do you think she’d say? Are you so sure what she’d say? What if she said that even after that totally negative as what happened was, at least now she understood it was possible. People can. Can see you as a thing. That people can see you as a thing, do you know what that means? Because if you really can see someone as a thing you can do anything to him. What would it be like to be able to be like that? You see, you think you can imagine it but you can’t. But she can. And now she knows something. I mean she really, really knows.
    This is what you wanted to hear, you wanted to hear about four drunk guys who knee-jerk you in the balls and make you bend over that you didn’t even know, that you never saw before, that you never did anything to, that don’t even know your name, they don’t even know your name to find out you have to choose to have a fucking name, you have no fucking idea, and what if I said that happened to ME? Would that make a difference?”
    David Foster Wallace, Brief Interviews with Hideous Men

  • #22
    J.D. Salinger
    “I am always saying "Glad to've met you" to somebody I'm not at all glad I met. If you want to stay alive, you have to say that stuff, though.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #23
    J.D. Salinger
    “I'm sick of not having the courage to be an absolute nobody.”
    J.D. Salinger, Franny and Zooey

  • #24
    David Foster Wallace
    “Everybody is identical in their secret unspoken belief that way deep down they are different from everyone else.”
    David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest

  • #25
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    “Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms. It's by talking nonsense that one gets to the truth! I talk nonsense, therefore I'm human”
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground

  • #26
    David Foster Wallace
    “The next suitable person you’re in light conversation with, you stop suddenly in the middle of the conversation and look at the person closely and say, “What’s wrong?” You say it in a concerned way. He’ll say, “What do you mean?” You say, “Something’s wrong. I can tell. What is it?” And he’ll look stunned and say, “How did you know?” He doesn’t realize something’s always wrong, with everybody. Often more than one thing. He doesn’t know everybody’s always going around all the time with something wrong and believing they’re exerting great willpower and control to keep other people, for whom they think nothing’s ever wrong, from seeing it.”
    David Foster Wallace, The Pale King

  • #27
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    “Right or wrong, it's very pleasant to break something from time to time.”
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky

  • #28
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    “I swear to you gentlemen, that to be overly conscious is a sickness, a real, thorough sickness.”
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground

  • #29
    J.D. Salinger
    “When you're dead, they really fix you up. I hope to hell when I do die somebody has sense enough to just dump me in the river or something. Anything except sticking me in a goddam cemetery. People coming and putting a bunch of flowers on your stomach on Sunday, and all that crap. Who wants flowers when you're dead? Nobody.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #30
    J.D. Salinger
    “I'm the most terrific liar you ever saw in your life. It's awful. If I'm on my way to the store to buy a magazine, even, and somebody asks me where I'm going, I'm liable to say I'm going to the opera. It's terrible.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye



Rss
« previous 1
All Quotes