Chris > Chris's Quotes

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  • #61
    “The single most important thing [you can do] is to shift [your] internal stance from "I understand" to "Help me understand." Everything else follows from that. . . .

    Remind yourself that if you think you already understand how someone feels or what they are trying to say, it is a delusion. Remember a time when you were sure you were right and then discovered one little fact that changed everything. There is always more to learn.”
    Douglas Stone, Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most


  • #62
    Lois Lowry
    “I have learned over the course of my many years that it is a bad idea, usually, to investigate piteous weeping but always a fine thing to look into a giggle.”
    Lois Lowry, The Willoughbys


  • #63
    Lois Lowry
    “We are four worthy orphans with a no-nonsense nanny."

    Like Mary Poppins?" suggested the man, with a pleased look of recognition.

    Not one bit like that fly-by-night woman," Nanny said with a sniff. "It almost gives me diabetes just to think of her: all those disgusting spoonfuls of sugar!”
    Lois Lowry, The Willoughbys


  • #64
    Neil Gaiman
    “This isn't about what is . . . it's about what people think is. It's all imaginary anyway. That's why it's important. People only fight over imaginary things.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods


  • #65
    Neil Gaiman
    “I guess it's just another one of life's little mysteries."

    "I'm tired of mysteries."

    "Yeah? I think they add a kind of zest to the world. Like salt in a stew.”
    Neil Gaiman, American Gods


  • #66
    “At that moment Jack reached an insight, one he never forgot: a bee in a story could tickle worse than a real bee. He realized, too, that a story peach could be sweeter than a real peach, a story flower more fragrant than a real flower, a story song more melodious than a real song. What existed in a story could be more real than what existed in the world. And by reaching this insight, Jack understood the true power of his art.”
    Edward Myers, STORYTELLER


  • #67
    “Storytellers tell stories, of course, but they aren't alone in doing so. The dawn tells a story; so does the sun as it arcs across the sky; so does the sunset. The seasons tell a complex story. The fall of an acorn and the growth of an oak tree tell a story. A farmer's plow and the furrows in a field tell a story as well. Even the waves crashing on a beach tell a story. How easy to see, then, that an ax tells a story, too, at least while it hangs for a moment in the air just before descending onto your neck. That story is: Now you die.
    Edward Myers, STORYTELLER


  • #68
    Melina Marchetta
    “Is a person worth more because they have someone to grieve for them?”
    Melina Marchetta, On the Jellicoe Road


  • #69
    Melina Marchetta
    “I don't say anything and he casually leans against my desk, picking up the novel that's sitting there.

    "It's bullshit," he tells me, flicking through it. "There's no such thing as Atticus Finch."

    I shrug. "It'd be nice if there was, though.”
    Melina Marchetta, On the Jellicoe Road


  • #70
    Mark Barrowcliffe
    “I knew you were meant to kiss girls, but there was something else that you were meant to do first, and I didn't know what that was.”
    Mark Barrowcliffe, The Elfish Gene: Dungeons, Dragons And Growing Up Strange


  • #71
    Mark Barrowcliffe
    “I thought it very likely I might have this sort of untestable power myself. It was kind of logical--no good at sport, alrightish at my studies, there must have been some field in which I excelled. Magic had to be it.

    It's difficult for adults to picture just what a grip these fantasies can take on a child. There's occasionally a reminder as a kid throws himself off a roof pretending to be Batman, but mostly the interior life of children goes unnoticed.

    When I say I thought I could be a wizard, that's exactly true. I really did believe I had latent magical powers, and, with enough concentration and fiddling my fingers into strange patterns, I might suddenly find how to unlock the magic inside me.

    I wouldn't call this a delusion, more a very strong suspicion. I'd weighed all the evidence, and that was the likely conclusion--so much so that I had to stop myself trying to turn Matt Bradon into a fly when he was jumping up and down on the desk in French saying, "Miss, what are mammary glands?" to the big-breasted Miss Mundsley. I feared that, if I succeeded, I might not be able to turn him back. It was important, I knew, to use my powers wisely.

    There's nothing that you'd have to call a psychoanalyst in for here. At the bottom line my growing interest in fantasy was just an expression of a very common feeling--"there's got to be something better than this," an easy one to have in the drab Midlands of the 1970s. I couldn't see it, though. My world was very small, and I couldn't imagine making things better incrementally, only a total escape.”
    Mark Barrowcliffe, The Elfish Gene: Dungeons, Dragons And Growing Up Strange


  • #72
    Mark Barrowcliffe
    “It's an odd fact of life that you don't really remember the good times all that well. I have only mental snapshots of birthday parties, skiing, beach holidays, my wedding. The bad times too are just impressions. I can see myself standing at the end of some bed while someone I love is dying, or on the way home from a girlfriend's after I've been dumped, but again, they're just pictures. For full Technicolor, script plus subtitles plus commemorative programme in the memory, though, nothing beats embarrassment. You tend to remember the lines pretty well once you've woken screaming them at midnight a few times.”
    Mark Barrowcliffe, The Elfish Gene: Dungeons, Dragons And Growing Up Strange


  • #73
    Mark Barrowcliffe
    “There is also a psychological phenomenon at work here that I believe is particularly male. A woman or girl--presuming one could be induced to take part in this sort of activity in the first place--having burned her hair and eyebrows would conclude that she had been lucky and reduce the amount of gas she put into the balloon next time. The man doesn't come to the same conclusion at all. He, singed and blackened, arrives at the point of view that he still has a margin of error to play with. After all, he isn't dead, and he's hardly likely to burn his eyebrows off again. They've already gone, history; he's moved on. There can be but one deduction--the dose needs to be increased.”
    Mark Barrowcliffe, The Elfish Gene: Dungeons, Dragons And Growing Up Strange


  • #74
    Jonathan Stroud
    “What is a gathering without unseemly drunkenness?”
    Jonathan Stroud, Heroes of the Valley


  • #75
    Jonathan Stroud
    “But I do get afraid. It's just that fear makes me sort of . . . angry and resentful, and I bite back at it. It's hard to describe."

    It isn't hard to describe, you idiot," Aud said. "It's called courage.”
    Jonathan Stroud, Heroes of the Valley


  • #76
    Philip Reeve
    “But boys will be boys, even the ones who are only girls dressed up: That's one of the rules of the world.”
    Philip Reeve, Here Lies Arthur


  • #77
    Philip Reeve
    “In the old days, I'd never given a thought to the future, and not much to the past. I'd lived simply in the now. I'd been happy if I had enough to eat, and nobody was hitting me. I'd been miserable when I was cold and frightened when I was ill, but mostly I gave no more thought than an animal did to what might happen tomorrow, or next week. Just an animal walking about on two legs, that's all I was till Myrddin changed me. It seemd to me sometimes I'd been happier that way.”
    Philip Reeve, Here Lies Arthur


  • #78
    Philip Reeve
    “And isn't that what all boys want and all men, too? Just to be taken seriously?”
    Philip Reeve, Here Lies Arthur


  • #79
    Philip Reeve
    “The one thing worse than an enemy is a friend turned false.”
    Philip Reeve, Here Lies Arthur


  • #80
    Philip Reeve
    “The small lives of women don't make for good stories. That's why there were no girls in the stories Myrddin told, unless they were there as a prize for the hero to win at the end of his adventures.”
    Philip Reeve, Here Lies Arthur


  • #81
    Philip Reeve
    “But the look on his face was so strange that I hadn't the heart to take his story away from him. He believed it, see. He believed the old gods were on Arthur's side just as he believed that winter would follow autumn and the sun would rise tomorrow. And I thought that maybe that believing would make him strong and brave and lucky when the fighting came, and maybe without it he'd be killed, or turn and run away, which was worse than being killed. So I kept quiet.”
    Philip Reeve, Here Lies Arthur


  • #82
    Philip Reeve
    “That's the trouble with a story spinner. You never know what's real and what's made up. Even when they are telling the truth, they can't stop themselves from spinning it into something better; something prettier, with more of a pattern to it.”
    Philip Reeve, Here Lies Arthur


  • #83
    E. Lockhart
    “I hate those endless descriptions of a heroine's physical attributes . . . it really bothers me how in books it seems like the only two choices are perfection or self-hatred. As if readers will only like a character who's ideal--or completely shattered.”
    E. Lockhart, The Boyfriend List: 15 Guys, 11 Shrink Appointments, 4 Ceramic Frogs and Me, Ruby Oliver


  • #84
    Daniel Quinn
    “In fact, of course, there is no secret knowledge; no one knows anything that can't be found on a shelf in the public library.”
    Daniel Quinn, Ishmael: An Adventure of the Mind and Spirit


  • #85
    Scott Westerfeld
    “Being pretty-minded is simply the natural state for most people. They want to be vapid and lazy and vain . . . and selfish. It only takes a twist to lock in that part of their personalities.”
    Scott Westerfeld, Pretties


  • #86
    Scott Westerfeld
    “Having a brain hurt so much sometimes.”
    Scott Westerfeld, Specials


  • #87
    Tim Tharp
    “The thought does cross my mind that I could slip and end up cracking my head on the pavement just short of the pool, but if you're always going to worry about minor drawbacks, then you'll never accomplish anything.”
    Tim Tharp, The Spectacular Now


  • #88
    Tim Tharp
    “She might be the only girl I've ever met who still hasn't learned to sacrifice bodily comfort for fashion's sake.”
    Tim Tharp, The Spectacular Now


  • #89
    Tim Tharp
    “It's more like I was daydreaming when the Supreme Being told me what I should do with my life, and it's too late to ask what it was.”
    Tim Tharp, The Spectacular Now


  • #90
    Tim Tharp
    “Books seem a little old-fashioned, but hey, I can do old-fashioned if it's good.”
    Tim Tharp, The Spectacular Now




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