Rhonda Reed > Rhonda's Quotes

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  • #1
    Charles Dickens
    “Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show.”
    Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

  • #2
    Jane Austen
    “You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope...I have loved none but you.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #3
    Jane Austen
    “All the privilege I claim for my own sex (it is not a very enviable one: you need not covet it), is that of loving longest, when existence or when hope is gone!”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #4
    Jane Austen
    “How quick come the reasons for approving what we like.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion
    tags: life

  • #5
    Jane Austen
    “One man's ways may be as good as another's, but we all like our own best.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #6
    Jane Austen
    “I hate to hear you talk about all women as if they were fine ladies instead of rational creatures. None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #7
    Jane Austen
    “My idea of good company...is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.'
    'You are mistaken,' said he gently, 'that is not good company, that is the best.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #8
    Emily Brontë
    “If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger.”
    Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

  • #9
    Emily Brontë
    “Heaven did not seem to be my home; and I broke my heart with weeping to come back to earth; and the angels were so angry that they flung me out into the middle of the heath on the top of Wuthering Heights; where I woke sobbing for joy.”
    Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

  • #10
    Emily Brontë
    “I wish you had sincerity enough to tell me whether Catherine would suffer greatly from his loss: the fear that she would restrains me. And there you see the distinction between our feelings: had he been in my place and I in his, though I hated him with a hatred that turned my life to gall, I never would have raised a hand against him. You may look incredulous, if you please! I never would have banished him from her society as long as she desired his. The moment her regard ceased, I could have torn his heart out, and drunk his blood! But, till then - if you don't believe me, you don't know me - till then, I would have died by inches before I touched a single hair of his head!”
    Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

  • #11
    Emily Brontë
    “My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods: time will change it, I'm well aware, as winter changes the trees. My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Healthcliff! He's always, always in my mind: not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself, but as my own being.”
    Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

  • #12
    Emily Brontë
    “If he loved with all the powers of his puny being, he couldn't love as much in eighty years as I could in a day.”
    Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

  • #13
    Emily Brontë
    “I have to remind myself to breathe -- almost to remind my heart to beat!”
    Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

  • #14
    Emily Brontë
    “Nelly, I am Heathcliff - he's always, always in my mind - not as a pleasure, any more then I am always a pleasure to myself - but, as my own being.”
    Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

  • #15
    Jane Austen
    “I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #16
    Jane Austen
    “What are men to rocks and mountains?”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #17
    Jane Austen
    “I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #18
    Jane Austen
    “I have not the pleasure of understanding you.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #19
    Thomas Hardy
    “And at home by the fire, whenever you look up there I shall be— and whenever I look up, there will be you.
    -Gabriel Oak”
    Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd

  • #20
    Thomas Hardy
    “Indifference to fate which, though it often makes a villain of a man, is the basis of his sublimity when it does not.”
    Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd

  • #21
    Thomas Hardy
    “We colour and mould according to the wants within us whatever our eyes bring in.”
    Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd

  • #22
    Thomas Hardy
    “Well, what I mean is that I shouldn't mind being a bride at a wedding, if I could be one without having a husband.”
    Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd

  • #23
    Thomas Hardy
    “Did you say the stars were worlds, Tess?"
    "Yes."
    "All like ours?"
    "I don't know, but I think so. They sometimes seem to be like the apples on our stubbard-tree. Most of them splendid and sound - a few blighted."
    "Which do we live on - a splendid one or a blighted one?"
    "A blighted one.”
    Thomas Hardy, Tess of the D'Urbervilles

  • #24
    Thomas Hardy
    “This hobble of being alive is rather serious, don’t you think so?”
    Thomas Hardy, Tess of the D'Urbervilles

  • #25
    Thomas Hardy
    “Beauty lay not in the thing, but in what the thing symbolized.”
    Thomas Hardy, Tess of the D'Urbervilles

  • #26
    Thomas Hardy
    “In the ill-judged execution of the well-judged plan of things the call seldom produces the comer, the man to love rarely coincides with the hour for loving. Nature does not often say "See!" to her poor creature at a time when seeing can lead to happy doing; or reply "Here!" to a body's cry of "Where?" till the hide-and-seek has become an irksome, outworn game. We may wonder whether at the acme and summit of the human progress these anachronisms will be corrected by a finer intuition, a close interaction of the social machinery than that which now jolts us round and along; but such completeness is not to be prophesied, or even conceived as possible. Enough that in the present case, as in millions, it was not the two halves of a perfect whole that confronted each other at the perfect moment; a missing counterpart wandered independently about the earth waiting in crass obtuseness till the late time came. Out of which maladroit delay sprang anxieties,disappointments, shocks, catastrophes, and passing-strange destinies.”
    Thomas Hardy, Tess of the D'Urbervilles

  • #27
    Thomas Hardy
    “Clare had studied the curves of those lips so many times that he could reproduce them mentally with ease: and now, as they again confronted him, clothed with colour and life, they sent an aura over his flesh, a breeze through his nerves, which wellnigh produced a qualm; and actually produced, by some mysterious physiological process, a prosaic sneeze.”
    Thomas Hardy, Tess of the D'Urbervilles
    tags: humor

  • #28
    Thomas Hardy
    “You, and those like you, take your fill of pleasure on earth by making the life of such as me bitter and black with sorrow; and then it is a fine thing, when you have had enough of that, to think of securing your pleasure in heaven by becoming converted!”
    Thomas Hardy, Tess of the D'Urbervilles

  • #29
    Thomas Hardy
    “[She] soon perceived that as she walked in the flock, sometimes with this one, sometimes with that, that the fresh night air was producing staggerings and serpentine courses among the men who had partaken too freely; some of the more careless women were also wandering in their gait. . . . Yet however terrestrial and lumpy their appearance just now to the mean unglamoured eye, to themselves the case was different. They followed the road with a sensation that they were soaring along in a supporting medium, possessed of original and profound thoughts, themselves and surrounding nature forming an organism of which all the parts harmoniously and joyously interpenetrated each other. They were as sublime as the moon and stars above them, and the moon and stars were as ardent as they.”
    Thomas Hardy, Tess of the D'Urbervilles

  • #30
    Charlotte Brontë
    “Jane, be still; don't struggle so like a wild, frantic bird, that is rending its own plumage in its desperation."
    "I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being, with an independent will; which I now exert to leave you.”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre



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