Mad Russian the Traveller > Mad Russian's Quotes

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  • #1
    G.K. Chesterton
    “It may be said with rough accuracy that there are three stages in the life of a strong people. First, it is a small power, and fights small powers. Then it is a great power, and fights great powers. Then it is a great power, and fights small powers, but pretends that they are great powers, in order to rekindle the ashes of its ancient emotion and vanity. After that, the next step is to become a small power itself.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #2
    C.S. Lewis
    “I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.”
    C.S. Lewis

  • #3
    Groucho Marx
    “Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.”
    Groucho Marx

  • #4
    Neal Stephenson
    “Nell," the Constable continued, indicating through his tone of voice that the lesson was concluding, "the difference between ignorant and educated people is that the latter know more facts. But that has nothing to do with whether they are stupid or intelligent. The difference between stupid and intelligent people—and this is true whether or not they are well-educated—is that intelligent people can handle subtlety. They are not baffled by ambiguous or even contradictory situations—in fact, they expect them and are apt to become suspicious when things seem overly straightforward.”
    Neal Stephenson, The Diamond Age: or, A Young Lady's Illustrated Primer

  • #5
    Philip K. Dick
    “In Washington and Moscow they are saying, 'Man has finally come of age; he doesn't need paternalistic help.' Which is another way of saying, 'We have abolished that help, and in its place we will rule,' offering no help at all: taking but not giving, ruling but not obeying, telling but not listening, taking life and not giving it. The slayers govern now, without interference; the dreams of mankind have become empty.”
    Philip K. Dick

  • #6
    Martin Luther
    “There never yet have been, nor are there now, too many good books.”
    Martin Luther

  • #7
    Thomas Jefferson
    “I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it.”
    Thomas Jefferson

  • #8
    John Milton
    “But what more oft in Nations grown corrupt,
    And by thir vices brought to servitude,
    Than to love Bondage more than Liberty,
    Bondage with ease than strenuous liberty;”
    John Milton, Samson Agonistes

  • #9
    Pete Seeger
    “Do you know the difference between education and experience? Education is when you read the fine print; experience is what you get when you don't. ”
    Pete Seeger

  • #10
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer
    “The most experienced psychologist or observer of human nature knows infinitely less of the human heart than the simplest Christian who lives beneath the Cross of Jesus. The greatest psychological insight, ability, and experience cannot grasp this one thing: what sin is. Worldly wisdom knows what distress and weakness and failure are, but it does not know the godlessness of man. And so it also does not know that man is destroyed only by his sin and can be healed only by forgiveness. Only the Christian knows this. In the presence of a psychiatrist I can only be a sick man; in the presence of a Christian brother I can dare to be a sinner. The psychiatrist must first search my heart and yet he never plumbs its ultimate depth. The Christian brother knows when I come to him: here is a sinner like myself, a godless man who wants to confess and yearns for God’s forgiveness. The psychiatrist views me as if there were no God. The brother views me as I am before the judging and merciful God in the Cross of Jesus Christ.”
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Life Together: The Classic Exploration of Christian Community

  • #11
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

  • #12
    C.S. Lewis
    “Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.”
    C.S. Lewis

  • #13
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement. For even the very wise cannot see all ends.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

  • #14
    Thomas Pynchon
    “If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don't have to worry about answers.”
    Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

  • #15
    Benjamin Franklin
    “Justice will not be served until those who are unaffected are as outraged as those who are.”
    Benjamin Franklin

  • #16
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “And on the subject of burning books: I want to congratulate librarians, not famous for their physical strength or their powerful political connections or their great wealth, who, all over this country, have staunchly resisted anti-democratic bullies who have tried to remove certain books from their shelves, and have refused to reveal to thought police the names of persons who have checked out those titles.

    So the America I loved still exists, if not in the White House or the Supreme Court or the Senate or the House of Representatives or the media. The America I love still exists at the front desks of our public libraries.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, A Man Without a Country

  • #17
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “But I have been too deeply hurt, Sam. I tried to save the Shire, and it has been saved, but not for me. It must often be so, Sam, when things are in danger: some one has to give them up, lose them, so that others may keep them.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

  • #18
    Edward R. Murrow
    “A nation of sheep will beget a government of wolves.”
    Edward R. Murrow

  • #19
    Vladimir Lenin
    “Freedom in capitalist society always remains about the same as it was in ancient Greek republics: Freedom for slave owners.”
    Vladimir Lenin

  • #20
    Theodore Roosevelt
    “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”
    Theodore Roosevelt

  • #21
    Karl Marx
    “The oppressed are allowed once every few years to decide which particular representatives of the oppressing class are to represent and repress them.”
    Karl Marx

  • #22
    Thomas Jefferson
    “I predict future happiness for Americans, if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.”
    Thomas Jefferson

  • #23
    Pericles
    “Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn't mean politics won't take an interest in you. ”
    Pericles

  • #24
    Yann Martel
    “If we, citizens, do not support our artists, then we sacrifice our imagination on the altar of crude reality and we end up believing in nothing and having worthless dreams.”
    Yann Martel, Life of Pi

  • #25
    Dwight D. Eisenhower
    “Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children. This is not a way of life at all in any true sense. Under the clouds of war, it is humanity hanging on a cross of iron.”
    Dwight D. Eisenhower

  • #26
    José Martí
    “The first duty of a man is to think for himself”
    José Martí

  • #27
    Ron Paul
    “One thing is clear: The Founding Fathers never intended a nation where citizens would pay nearly half of everything they earn to the government.”
    Ron Paul

  • #28
    Thomas Jefferson
    “Our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions any more than our opinions in physics or geometry...”
    Thomas Jefferson, The Statute Of Virginia For Religious Freedom

  • #29
    Bertrand Russell
    “Our great democracies still tend to think that a stupid man is more likely to be honest than a clever man, and our politicians take advantage of this prejudice by pretending to be even more stupid than nature made them.”
    Bertrand Russell, New Hopes for a Changing World

  • #30
    John  Adams
    “The science of government it is my duty to study, more than all other sciences; the arts of legislation and administration and negotiation ought to take the place of, indeed exclude, in a manner, all other arts. I must study politics and war, that our sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. Our sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history and naval architecture, navigation, commerce and agriculture in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry and porcelain.”
    John Adams, Letters of John Adams, Addressed to His Wife



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