David > David's Quotes

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  • #1
    Anthony Powell
    “His mastery of the hard-luck story was of a kind never achieved by persons not wholly concentrated on themselves.”
    Anthony Powell, A Dance to the Music of Time: 1st Movement

  • #2
    Chuck Palahniuk
    “It's so hard to forget pain, but it's even harder to remember sweetness. We have no scar to show for happiness. We learn so little from peace.”
    Chuck Palahniuk, Diary

  • #3
    Cormac McCarthy
    “If God meant to interfere in the degeneracy of mankind would he not have done so by now? Wolves cull themselves, man. What other creatures could? And is the race of man not more predacious yet?”
    Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West

  • #4
    Catherynne M. Valente
    “One ought not to judge her: all children are Heartless. They have not grown a heart yet, which is why they can climb high trees and say shocking things and leap so very high grown-up hearts flutter in terror. Hearts weigh quite a lot. That is why it takes so long to grow one. But, as in their reading and arithmetic and drawing, different children proceed at different speeds. (It is well known that reading quickens the growth of a heart like nothing else.) Some small ones are terrible and fey, Utterly Heartless. Some are dear and sweet and Hardly Heartless At All. September stood very generally in the middle on the day the Green Wind took her, Somewhat Heartless, and Somewhat Grown.”
    Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making

  • #5
    Catherynne M. Valente
    “When little ones say they want to go home, they almost never mean it. They mean they are tired of this particular game and would like to start another.”
    Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making

  • #6
    Catherynne M. Valente
    “I believe we have an utterly unique specimen on our hands: a child who listens.”
    Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making

  • #7
    Catherynne M. Valente
    “That’s what happens to friends, eventually. They leave you. It’s practically what they’re for.”
    Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making

  • #8
    Catherynne M. Valente
    “When you are born,” the golem said softly, “your courage is new and clean. You are brave enough for anything: crawling off of staircases, saying your first words without fearing that someone will think you are foolish, putting strange things in your mouth. But as you get older, your courage attracts gunk, and crusty things, and dirt, and fear, and knowing how bad things can get and what pain feels like. By the time you’re half-grown, your courage barely moves at all, it’s so grunged up with living. So every once in awhile, you have to scrub it up and get the works going, or else you’ll never be brave again.”
    Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making

  • #9
    Catherynne M. Valente
    “Who are you?"

    "I am Death," said the creature. "I thought that was obvious."

    "But you're so small!"

    "Only because you are small. You are young and far from your Death, September, so I seem as anything would seem if you saw it from a long way off-very small, very harmless. But I am always closer than I appear. As you grow, I shall grow with you, until at the end, I shall loom huge and dark over your bed, and you will shut your eyes so as not to see me.”
    Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making

  • #10
    Anthony Powell
    “Later in life, I learnt that many things one may require have to be weighed against one's dignity, which can be an insuperable barrier against advancement in almost any direction. However, in those days, choice between dignity and unsatisfied curiosity was less clear to me as a cruel decision that had to be made.”
    Anthony Powell, A Dance to the Music of Time: 1st Movement

  • #11
    Anthony Powell
    “He gave me a look of great contempt; as I supposed, for venturing, even by implication, to draw a parallel between a lack of affluence that might, literally, affect my purchase of rare vintages, and a figure of speech intended delicately to convey his own dire want for the bare necessities of life. He remained silent for several seconds, as if trying to make up his mind whether he could ever bring himself to speak to me again; and then said gruffly: 'I've got to go now.”
    Anthony Powell, A Buyer's Market

  • #12
    Anthony Powell
    “Feeling unable to maintain this detachment of attitude towards human- and, in especial, matrimonial- affairs, I asked whether it was not true that she had married Bob Duport. She nodded; not exactly conveying, it seemed to me, that by some happy chance their union had introduced her to an unexpected terrestrial paradise.”
    Anthony Powell, A Buyer's Market

  • #13
    Anthony Powell
    “There is, after all, no pleasure like that given by a woman who really wants to see you.”
    Anthony Powell, The Acceptance World

  • #14
    Anthony Powell
    “Well,' said Mrs. Erdleigh, speaking kindly, as if to a child who has proposed a game inevitably associated with the breakage of china, 'I know trouble will come of it if we do.”
    Anthony Powell, A Dance to the Music of Time: 2nd Movement

  • #15
    John Green
    “And all at once I knew how Margo Roth Spiegelman felt when she wasn't being Margo Roth Spiegelman: she felt empty. She felt the unscaleable wall surrounding her. I thought of her asleep on the carpet with only that jagged sliver of sky above her. Maybe Margo felt comfortable there because Margo the person lived like that all the time: in an abandoned room with blocked-out windows, the only light pouring in through holes in the roof. Yes. The fundamental mistake I had always made—and that she had, in fairness, always led me to make—was this: Margo was not a miracle. She was not an adventure. She was not a fine and precious thing. She was a girl.”
    John Green, Paper Towns

  • #16
    Chuck Palahniuk
    “Reread that Bronte book all you want, but Jane Eyre's never going to get gender-reassignment surgery or train to become a kick-ass ninja assassin.”
    Chuck Palahniuk, Damned

  • #17
    Chuck Palahniuk
    “What makes earth feel like hell is our expectation that it should feel like heaven.”
    Chuck Palahniuk, Damned

  • #18
    Trevanian
    “It was not their irritating assumption of equality that annoyed Nicholai so much as their cultural confusions. The Americans seemed to confuse standard of living with quality of life, equal opportunity with institutionalized mediocrity, bravery with courage, machismo with manhood, liberty with freedom, wordiness with articulation, fun with pleasure - in short, all of the misconceptions common to those who assume that justice implies equality for all, rather than equality for equals.”
    Trevanian, Shibumi

  • #19
    Anthony Powell
    “When people really hate one another, the tension within them can sometimes make itself felt throughout a room, like atmospheric waves, first hot, then cold, wafted backwards and forwards as if in an invisible process of air conditioning, creating a pervasive physical disturbance.”
    Anthony Powell, The Valley of Bones

  • #20
    William Faulkner
    “She is like all the rest of them. Whether they are seventeen or fortyseven, when they finally come to surrender completely, it's going to be in words.”
    William Faulkner, Light in August

  • #21
    William Faulkner
    “A man. All men. He will pass up a hundred chances to do good for one chance to meddle where meddling is not wanted. He will overlook and fail to see chances, opportunities, for riches and fame and welldoing, and even sometimes for evil. But he won't fail to see a chance to meddle.”
    William Faulkner, Light in August

  • #22
    Ray Bradbury
    “Nobody moved.

    Everybody sat in the dark cellar, suspended in the suddenly frozen task of this October game; the wind blew outside, banging the house, the smell of pumpkins and apples filled the room with smell of the objects in their fingers while one boy cried, “I'll go upstairs and look!” and he ran upstairs hopefully and out around the house, four times around the house, calling, “Marion, Marion, Marion!” over and over and at last coming slowly down the stairs into the waiting breathing cellar and saying to the darkness, “I can't find her.”

    Then... some idiot turned on the lights.
    ("The October Game")”
    Ray Bradbury, Long After Midnight

  • #23
    Ray Bradbury
    “It was a simple thing. All terror is a simplicity. ("Interval In Sunlight")”
    Ray Bradbury, Long After Midnight

  • #24
    Catherynne M. Valente
    “They snickered behind her back in tones that sent up prickly hedges all around their tight huddles of lace dresses and ribboned curls.”
    Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

  • #25
    Catherynne M. Valente
    “For though, as we have said, all children are heartless, this is not precisely true of teenagers. Teenage hearts are raw and new, fast and fierce, and they do not know their own strength. Neither do they know reason or restraint, and if you want to know the truth, a goodly number of grown-up hearts never learn it.”
    Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

  • #26
    Catherynne M. Valente
    “Because it's my fault, you see. I did it. And you must always clean up your own messes, even when your messes look just like you and curtsy very viciously when what they mean is, I am going to make trouble forever and ever.”
    Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

  • #27
    Haruki Murakami
    “Don't feel sorry for yourself. Only assholes do that.”
    Haruki Murakami, Norwegian Wood

  • #28
    Haruki Murakami
    “If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.”
    Haruki Murakami, Norwegian Wood

  • #29
    Catherynne M. Valente
    “September had never been betrayed before. She did not even know what to call the feeling in her chest, so bitter and sour. Poor child. There is always a first time, and it is never the last time.”
    Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

  • #30
    Catherynne M. Valente
    “Just as there are different types of stars—red and white and brown and blue and dwarf and giant and all that lot—there are different types of Quests, and if we determine what type you face, we shall have a much easier time managing the whole business. We’re doing very well. Already we know that Prince Myrrh is an Endgame Object Type W—that’s Wonderful, since we have yet to see if he will be any Use in governing. He sleeps suspended in a Theseus-type narrative matrix, however he does seem to have some gravitational pull on events, which is unusual for a T-Type. After all, we still remember him even after all these years. It’s far easier to forget something than to remember it. Remembering takes all kinds of magic. No one knows who he is or what he looks like or where to find him, and yet we all know of him. We all know he sleeps in an unopenable box on an unbreakable bower. That’s a frightfully strong E.K.T. Field for one little creature!”
    Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There



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