Wombok > Wombok's Quotes

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  • #1
    Margaret Atwood
    “If we were all on trial for our thoughts, we would all be hanged.”
    Margaret Atwood, Alias Grace

  • #2
    Susanna Kaysen
    “Was insanity just a matter of dropping the act?”
    Susanna Kaysen, Girl, Interrupted

  • #3
    S.E. Hinton
    “Sixteen years on the streets and you can learn a lot. But all the wrong things, not the things you want to learn. Sixteen years on the streets and you see a lot. But all the wrong sights, not the things you want to see.”
    S.E. Hinton, The Outsiders

  • #4
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Go back?" he thought. "No good at all! Go sideways? Impossible! Go forward? Only thing to do! On we go!" So up he got, and trotted along with his little sword held in front of him and one hand feeling the wall, and his heart all of a patter and a pitter.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

  • #5
    Haruki Murakami
    “I have this strange feeling that I'm not myself anymore. It's hard to put into words, but I guess it's like I was fast asleep, and someone came, disassembled me, and hurriedly put me back together again. That sort of feeling.”
    Haruki Murakami, Sputnik Sweetheart

  • #6
    Haruki Murakami
    “If she did experience sex--or something close to it--in high school, I'm sure it would have been less out of sexual desire or love than literary curiosity.”
    Haruki Murakami, Sputnik Sweetheart

  • #7
    Oscar Wilde
    “In matters of grave importance, style, not sincerity, is the vital thing.”
    Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest

  • #8
    Oscar Wilde
    “Well I won't argue about the matter. You always want to argue about things.
    That is exactly what things were originally made for.”
    Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest

  • #9
    Lois Lowry
    “We gained control of many things. But we had to let go of others.”
    Lois Lowry, The Giver

  • #10
    Margaret Atwood
    “Who is to say that prayers have any effect? On the other hand, who is to say they don't? I picture the gods, diddling around on Olympus, wallowing in the nectar and ambrosia and the aroma of burning bones and fat, mischievous as a pack of ten-year-olds with a sick cat to play with and a lot of time on their hands. 'Which prayer shall we answer today?' they ask one another. 'Let's cast the dice! Hope for this one, despair for that one, and while we're at it, let's destroy the life of that woman over there by having sex with her in the form of a crayfish!' I think they pull a lot of their pranks because they're bored.”
    Margaret Atwood, The Penelopiad
    tags: gods

  • #11
    Jeffrey Eugenides
    “Can you see me? All of me? Probably not. No one ever really has.”
    Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex

  • #12
    Jeffrey Eugenides
    “Maybe the best proof that the language is patriarchal is that it oversimplifies feeling.”
    Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex

  • #13
    Jeffrey Eugenides
    “But maybe the Charm Bracelets understood more about life than I did. From an early age they knew what little value the world placed in books, and so didn't waste their time with them. Whereas I, even now, persist in believing that these black marks on white paper bear the greatest significance, that if I keep writing, I might be able to catch the rainbow of consciousness in a jar.”
    Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex

  • #14
    Jeffrey Eugenides
    “I was beginning to understand something about normality. Normality wasn't normal. It couldn't be. If normality were normal, everybody could leave it alone. They could sit back and let normality manifest itself. But people-and especially doctors- had doubts about normality. They weren't sure normality was up the job. And so they felt inclined to give it a boost.”
    Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex

  • #15
    J.D. Salinger
    “I don't know what good it is to know so much and be smart as whips and all if it doesn't make you happy.”
    J.D. Salinger, Franny and Zooey

  • #16
    J.D. Salinger
    “You don't know how to talk to people you don't like. Don't love, really. You can't live in the world with such strong likes and dislikes.”
    J.D. Salinger, Franny and Zooey
    tags: self

  • #17
    J.D. Salinger
    “If you can't, or won't, think of Seymour, then you go right ahead and call in some ignorant psychoanalyst. You just do that. You just call in some analyst who's experienced in adjusting people to the joys of television, and Life magazine every Wednesday, and European travel, and the H-bomb, and Presidential elections, and the front page of the Times, and God knows what else that's gloriously normal.”
    J.D. Salinger, Franny and Zooey

  • #18
    J.D. Salinger
    “Anyway, I started bitching one night before the broadcast. Seymour'd told me to shine my shoes just as I was going out the door with Waker. I was furious. The studio audience were all morons, the announcer was a moron, the sponsors were morons, and I just damn well wasn't going to shine my shoes for them, I told Seymour. I said they couldn't see them anyway, where we sat. He said to shine them anyway. He said to shine them for the Fat Lady.”
    J.D. Salinger, Franny and Zooey

  • #19
    Philip Pullman
    “Lord, if I thought you were listening, I'd pray for this above all: that any church set up in your name should remain poor, and powerless, and modest. That it should wield no authority except that of love. That it should never cast anyone out. That it should own no property and make no laws. That it should not condemn, but only forgive.”
    Philip Pullman, The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ

  • #20
    John Kennedy Toole
    “You could tell by the way he talked, though, that he had gone to school a long time. That was probably what was wrong with him.”
    John Kennedy Toole, A Confederacy of Dunces

  • #21
    John Kennedy Toole
    “I refuse to "look up." Optimism nauseates me. It is perverse. Since man's fall, his proper position in the universe has been one of misery.”
    John Kennedy Toole, A Confederacy of Dunces

  • #22
    Ken Kesey
    “All I know is this: nobody's very big in the first place, and it looks to me like everybody spends their whole life tearing everybody else down.”
    Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

  • #23
    Ken Kesey
    “No, my friend. We are lunatics from the hospital up the highway, psycho-ceramics, the cracked pots of mankind. Would you like me to decipher a Rorschach for you?”
    Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

  • #24
    Sylvia Plath
    “I saw my life branching out before me like the green fig tree in the story. From the tip of every branch, like a fat purple fig, a wonderful future beckoned and winked. One fig was a husband and a happy home and children, and another fig was a famous poet and another fig was a brilliant professor, and another fig was Ee Gee, the amazing editor, and another fig was Europe and Africa and South America, and another fig was Constantin and Socrates and Attila and a pack of other lovers with queer names and offbeat professions, and another fig was an Olympic lady crew champion, and beyond and above these figs were many more figs I couldn't quite make out. I saw myself sitting in the crotch of this fig tree, starving to death, just because I couldn't make up my mind which of the figs I would choose. I wanted each and every one of them, but choosing one meant losing all the rest, and, as I sat there, unable to decide, the figs began to wrinkle and go black, and, one by one, they plopped to the ground at my feet.”
    Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar

  • #25
    Viktor E. Frankl
    “Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”
    Viktor E. Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning

  • #26
    Stephen Chbosky
    “So, this is my life. And I want you to know that I am both happy and sad and I'm still trying to figure out how that could be.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #27
    Stephen Chbosky
    “There's nothing like deep breaths after laughing that hard. Nothing in the world like a sore stomach for the right reasons.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #28
    Albert Camus
    “For who would dare to assert that eternal happiness can compensate for a single moment's human suffering”
    Albert Camus, The Plague

  • #29
    Albert Camus
    “But again and again there comes a time in history when the man who dares to say that two and two make four is punished with death. The schoolteacher is well aware of this. And the question is not one of knowing what punishment or reward attends the making of this calculation. The question is one of knowing whether two and two do make four”
    Albert Camus, The Plague

  • #30
    Voltaire
    “I read only to please myself, and enjoy only what suits my taste.”
    Voltaire, Candide and Other Tales



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