Paigey > Paigey's Quotes

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  • #151
    Christopher Moore
    “Canada is a myth people made up to entertain children, like the Tooth Fairy. There’s no such place.”
    Christopher Moore

  • #152
    Christopher Moore
    “I've tried to get the angel to watch MTV so I can learn the vocabulary of your music, but even with the gift of tongues, I'm having trouble learning to speak hip-hop. Why is it that one can busta rhyme or busta move anywhere but you must busta cap in someone's ass? Is "ho" always feminine, and "muthafucka" always masculine, while "bitch" can be either? How many peeps in a posse, how much booty before baby got back, do you have to be all that to get all up in that, and do I need to be dope and phat to be da bomb or can I just be "stupid"? I'll not be singing over any dead mothers until I understand.”
    Christopher Moore, Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal

  • #153
    Christopher Moore
    “Last time I really got to know myself it turned out there was a whole gang of bitches in there to deal with. I felt like the receptionist at a rehab center. They all had nice tits though, I gotta say.”
    Christopher Moore

  • #154
    Christopher Moore
    “. . . You seem upset, Charlie. Is something wrong?
    Charlie: No, no, I’m okay, I just had to take directions from a mute beaver in a fez to get here, it’s unsettling.”
    Christopher Moore, A Dirty Job

  • #155
    Christopher Moore
    “...as if someone had thrown a hand grenade into the middle of a teddy bear orgy and the only survivors had had their fur blown off.”
    Christopher Moore, You Suck

  • #156
    Cassandra Clare
    “One must always be careful of books," said Tessa, "and what is inside them, for words have the power to change us.”
    Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Angel

  • #157
    Cassandra Clare
    “You know," Gabriel said, "there was a time I thought we could be friends, Will."

    "There was a time I thought I was a ferret," Will said, "but that turned out to be the opium haze. Did you know it had that effect? Because I didn't.”
    Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Angel

  • #158
    Cassandra Clare
    “That was enterprising," Will sounded nearly impressed.
    Nate smiled. Tess shot him a furious look. "Don't look pleased with yourself. When Will says 'enterprising' he means 'morally deficient.'"
    "No, I mean enterprising," said Will. "When I mean morally deficient, I say, 'Now, that's something I would have done'.”
    Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Angel

  • #159
    Cassandra Clare
    “Jem seemed to look through her then, as if he were seeing something beyond her, beyond the corridor, beyond the Institute itself. "Whatever you are physically," he said, "male or female, strong or weak, ill or healthy--all those things matter less than what your heart contains. If you have the soul of a warrior, you are a warrior. All those other things, they are the glass that contains the lamp, but you are the light inside." He smiled them, seeming to have come back to himself, slightly embarrassed. "That's what I believe.”
    Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Angel

  • #160
    Cassandra Clare
    “It is not the same thing to be good and to be kind.”
    Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Angel

  • #161
    Cassandra Clare
    “There's plenty of sense in nonsense sometimes, if you wish to look for it.”
    Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Angel

  • #162
    Cassandra Clare
    “Only the very weak-minded refuse to be influenced by literature and poetry.”
    Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Angel

  • #163
    Cassandra Clare
    “Will looked horrified. "What kind of monster could possibly hate chocolate?”
    Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Angel

  • #164
    Hilary Thayer Hamann
    “Kindness is everything . . . When you receive it and express it, it becomes the whole meaning of things. It's life, demystified. A place out of self. Not a waltz, the the whirls within a waltz.”
    Hilary Thayer Hamann, Anthropology of an American Girl

  • #165
    Hilary Thayer Hamann
    Boys will be boys, that's what people say. No one ever mentions how girls have to be something other than themselves altogether. We are to stifle the same feelings that boys are encouraged to display. We are to use gossip as a means of policing ourselves -- this way those who do succumb to sex but are not damaged by it are damaged instead by peer malice. Girls demand a covenant because if one gives in, others will be expected to do the same. We are to remain united in cruelty, ignorance, and aversion. Or we are to starve the flesh from our bones, penalizing the body for its nature, castigating ourselves for advances we are powerless to prevent. We are to make false promises then resist the attentions solicited. Basically we are to become expert liars. (p. 65)”
    Hilary Thayer Hamann, Anthropology of an American Girl

  • #166
    Hilary Thayer Hamann
    “And loneliness. I should say something of loneliness. The panic, the sweeping hysteria that comes not when you are without others, but when you are without yourself, adrift. I should describe the filthy province of mind, the blighted district inside, the place so crowded you cannot raise the lids of your eyes. Your shoulders are drawn and your head has fallen and your chest is bruised by the constant assault of your heart. (p. 37)”
    Hilary Thayer Hamann, Anthropology of an American Girl

  • #167
    Hilary Thayer Hamann
    “The unusual thing about quiet is that when you seek it, it is almost impossible to achieve. When you strive for quiet, you become impatient, and impatience is itself a noiseless noise. You can block every superficial sound, but, with each new layer extinguished, a next rises up, finer and more entrapping, until you arrive at last in the infinite attitude of your own riotous mind. Inside is where all the memories last like wells, and the unspoken wishes like golden buds, and the pain that you keep, lingering and implicit, staying inside, nesting inside, articulating, articulating, through to the day you die. (p. 240)”
    Hilary Thayer Hamann, Anthropology of an American Girl

  • #168
    Hilary Thayer Hamann
    “Now that I'd experienced being a woman to a man I was in love with, I'd become self-conscious about being a woman to the world in general. Of course, being female is always indelicate and extreme, like operating heavy machinery. Every woman knows the feeling of being a stack of roving flesh. Sometimes all you've accomplished by the end of the day is to have maneuvered your body through space without grave incident.”
    Hilary Thayer Hamann, Anthropology of an American Girl

  • #169
    Bree Despain
    “We don't forgive people because they deserve it. We forgive them because
    they need it--because we need it. I'm sure you felt much better after forgiving your son.”
    Bree Despain

  • #170
    Bree Despain
    “There's a difference between people who do hurtful things because they're evil and people who do bad things because of their circumstances.”
    Bree Despain

  • #171
    Bree Despain
    “But why is it so hard to forgive?' Mrs. Conners asked.

    'Pride,' Dad said. 'This person has already wronged you in some way, and now you are the one who has to swallow your pride, give something up, in order to forgive him.”
    Bree Despain, The Dark Divine

  • #172
    Stephen Chbosky
    “So, this is my life. And I want you to know that I am both happy and sad and I'm still trying to figure out how that could be.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #173
    Stephen Chbosky
    “Things change. And friends leave. Life doesn't stop for anybody.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #174
    Stephen Chbosky
    “So, I guess we are who we are for alot of reasons. And maybe we'll never know most of them. But even if we don't have the power to choose where we come from, we can still choose where we go from there. We can still do things. And we can try to feel okay about them.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #175
    Stephen Chbosky
    “I am very interested and fascinated how everyone loves each other, but no one really likes each other.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower
    tags: moi

  • #176
    Stephen Chbosky
    “I think that if I ever have kids, and they are upset, I won't tell them that people are starving in China or anything like that because it wouldn't change the fact that they were upset. And even if somebody else has it much worse, that doesn't really change the fact that you have what you have.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #177
    Stephen Chbosky
    “There's nothing like deep breaths after laughing that hard. Nothing in the world like a sore stomach for the right reasons.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #178
    Stephen Chbosky
    “And I thought about how many people have loved those songs. And how many people got through a lot of bad times because of those songs. And how many people enjoyed good times with those songs. And how much those songs really mean. I think it would be great to have written one of those songs. I bet if I wrote one of them, I would be very proud. I hope the people who wrote those songs are happy. I hope they feel it's enough. I really do because they've made me happy. And I'm only one person.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #179
    Stephen Chbosky
    “I walked over to the hill where we used to go and sled. There were a lot of little kids there. I watched them flying. Doing jumps and having races. And I thought that all those little kids are going to grow up someday. And all of those little kids are going to do the things that we do. And they will all kiss someone someday. But for now, sledding is enough. I think it would be great if sledding were always enough, but it isn't.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #180
    Stephen Chbosky
    “I walk around the school hallways and look at the people. I look at the teachers and wonder why they're here. If they like their jobs. Or us. And I wonder how smart they were when they were fifteen. Not in a mean way. In a curious way. It's like looking at all the students and wondering who's had their heart broken that day, and how they are able to cope with having three quizzes and a book report due on top of that. Or wondering who did the heart breaking. And wondering why.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower



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