Daniel Lambert > Daniel's Quotes

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  • #1
    Stevie Wonder
    “You can't base your life on other people's expectations.”
    Stevie Wonder

  • #2
    Truman Capote
    “Never love a wild thing, Mr. Bell,' Holly advised him. 'That was Doc's mistake. He was always lugging home wild things. A hawk with a hurt wing. One time it was a full-grown bobcat with a broken leg. But you can't give your heart to a wild thing: the more you do, the stronger they get. Until they're strong enough to run into the woods. Or fly into a tree. Then a taller tree. Then the sky. That's how you'll end up, Mr. Bell. If you let yourself love a wild thing. You'll end up looking at the sky."
    "She's drunk," Joe Bell informed me.
    "Moderately," Holly confessed....Holly lifted her martini. "Let's wish the Doc luck, too," she said, touching her glass against mine. "Good luck: and believe me, dearest Doc -- it's better to look at the sky than live there. Such an empty place; so vague. Just a country where the thunder goes and things disappear.”
    Truman Capote, Breakfast at Tiffany's

  • #3
    Truman Capote
    “More tears are shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones.”
    Truman Capote, Answered Prayers - The Unfinished Novel

  • #4
    William Shakespeare
    “There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.”
    William Shakespeare, Hamlet

  • #5
    William Shakespeare
    “To be, or not to be: that is the question:
    Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
    Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
    And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
    No more; and by a sleep to say we end
    The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
    That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
    Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
    To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
    For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
    When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
    Must give us pause: there's the respect
    That makes calamity of so long life;
    For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
    The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
    The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
    The insolence of office and the spurns
    That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
    When he himself might his quietus make
    With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
    To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
    But that the dread of something after death,
    The undiscover'd country from whose bourn
    No traveller returns, puzzles the will
    And makes us rather bear those ills we have
    Than fly to others that we know not of?
    Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
    And thus the native hue of resolution
    Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
    And enterprises of great pith and moment
    With this regard their currents turn awry,
    And lose the name of action.--Soft you now!
    The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons
    Be all my sins remember'd!”
    William Shakespeare, Hamlet

  • #6
    William Shakespeare
    “There are more things in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.”
    William Shakespeare, Hamlet

  • #7
    Steven Wright
    “I just got out of the hospital. I was in a speed reading accident. I hit a book mark and flew across the room.”
    Steven Wright

  • #8
    George Burns
    “Happiness is having a large, loving, caring, close-knit family in another city.”
    George Burns

  • #9
    Robert A. Heinlein
    “Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.”
    Robert A. Heinlein

  • #10
    Dalai Lama XIV
    “Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.”
    Dalai Lama XIV

  • #11
    Abraham Lincoln
    “Folks are usually about as happy as they make their minds up to be.”
    Abraham Lincoln

  • #12
    James Joyce
    “History, Stephen said, is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake.”
    James Joyce, Ulysses

  • #13
    Whitley Strieber
    “...endless day-to-day shallowness, a monotony that leaves a person wondering years later where all the time went and sorry that it's all gone”
    Whitley Strieber

  • #14
    Whitley Strieber
    “Old enough to know better, but too young to care.”
    Whitley Strieber

  • #15
    Jim Butcher
    “You can have everything in the world, but if you don't have love, none of it means crap," he said promptly. "Love is patient. Love is kind. Love always forgives, trusts, supports, and endures. Love never fails. When every star in the heavens grows cold, and when silence lies once more on the face of the deep, three things will endure: faith, hope, and love."

    And the greatest of these is love," I finished. "That's from the Bible."

    First Corinthians, chapter thirteen," Thomas confirmed. "I paraphrased. Father makes all of us memorize that passage. Like when parents put those green yucky-face stickers on the poisonous cleaning products under the kitchen sink.”
    Jim Butcher, Blood Rites

  • #16
    Alice Sebold
    “You don't notice the dead leaving when they really choose to leave you. You're not meant to. At most you feel them as a whisper or the wave of a whisper undulating down. I would compare it to a woman in the back of a lecture hall or theater whom no one notices until she slips out.Then only those near the door themselves, like Grandma Lynn, notice; to the rest it is like an unexplained breeze in a closed room.
    Grandma Lynn died several years later, but I have yet to see her here. I imagine her tying it on in her heaven, drinking mint juleps with Tennessee Williams and Dean Martin. She'll be here in her own sweet time, I'm sure.
    If I'm to be honest with you, I still sneak away to watch my family sometimes. I can't help it, and sometimes they still think of me. They can't help it....
    It was a suprise to everyone when Lindsey found out she was pregnant...My father dreamed that one day he might teach another child to love ships in bottles. He knew there would be both sadness and joy in it; that it would always hold an echo of me.
    I would like to tell you that it is beautiful here, that I am, and you will one day be, forever safe. But this heaven is not about safety just as, in its graciousness, it isn't about gritty reality. We have fun.
    We do things that leave humans stumped and grateful, like Buckley's garden coming up one year, all of its crazy jumble of plants blooming all at once. I did that for my mother who, having stayed, found herself facing the yard again. Marvel was what she did at all the flowers and herbs and budding weeds. Marveling was what she mostly did after she came back- at the twists life took.
    And my parents gave my leftover possessions to the Goodwill, along with Grandma Lynn's things.
    They kept sharing when they felt me. Being together, thinking and talking about the dead, became a perfectly normal part of their life. And I listened to my brother, Buckley, as he beat the drums.
    Ray became Dr. Singh... And he had more and more moments that he chose not to disbelieve. Even if surrounding him were the serious surgeons and scientists who ruled over a world of black and white, he maintained this possibility: that the ushering strangers that sometimes appeared to the dying were not the results of strokes, that he had called Ruth by my name, and that he had, indeed, made love to me.
    If he ever doubted, he called Ruth. Ruth, who graduated from a closet to a closet-sized studio on the Lower East Side. Ruth, who was still trying to find a way to write down whom she saw and what she had experienced. Ruth, who wanted everyone to believe what she knew: that the dead truly talk to us, that in the air between the living, spirits bob and weave and laugh with us. They are the oxygen we breathe.
    Now I am in the place I call this wide wide Heaven because it includes all my simplest desires but also the most humble and grand. The word my grandfather uses is comfort.
    So there are cakes and pillows and colors galore, but underneath this more obvious patchwork quilt are places like a quiet room where you can go and hold someone's hand and not have to say anything. Give no story. Make no claim. Where you can live at the edge of your skin for as long as you wish. This wide wide Heaven is about flathead nails and the soft down of new leaves, wide roller coaster rides and escaped marbles that fall then hang then take you somewhere you could never have imagined in your small-heaven dreams.”
    Alice Sebold, The Lovely Bones

  • #17
    J.B.S. Haldane
    “Now, my own suspicion is that the universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose. I have read and heard many attempts at a systematic account of it, from materialism and theosophy to the Christian system or that of Kant, and I have always felt that they were much too simple. I suspect that there are more things in heaven and earth that are dreamed of, or can be dreamed of, in any philosophy. That is the reason why I have no philosophy myself, and must be my excuse for dreaming.”
    J.B.S. Haldane, Possible Worlds

  • #18
    Multatuli
    “I would like to meet myself sometime to see how I would look to myself. But I'd have to be in an extremely good state of mind on such a day, because I don't like unpleasantness.”
    Multatuli, The Oyster and the Eagle: Selected Aphorisms and Parables

  • #19
    “Greed is eternal.”
    The Ferrengi Rules of Acquisition 10

  • #20
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “I hope she'll be a fool -- that's the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  • #21
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  • #22
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “I don't want to repeat my innocence. I want the pleasure of losing it again.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

  • #23
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “And I like large parties. They’re so intimate. At small parties there isn’t any privacy.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  • #24
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “I wasn't actually in love, but I felt a sort of tender curiosity.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  • #25
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “You see I usually find myself among strangers because I drift here and there trying to forget the sad things that happened to me.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  • #26
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “Whenever you feel like criticizing any one...just remember that all the people in this world haven't had the advantages that you've had.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • #27
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “Cut out all these exclamation points. An exclamation point is like laughing at your own joke.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • #28
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “You don't write because you want to say something, you write because you have something to say.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • #29
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “Angry, and half in love with her, and tremendously sorry, I turned away.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  • #30
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “I like people and I like them to like me, but I wear my heart where God put it, on the inside. ”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald



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