Pam > Pam's Quotes

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  • #1
    Meg Cabot
    “The fact is, I love him. He's the boy I want and one day he'll be MINE.”
    Meg Cabot, Princess in Training

  • #2
    “For the truth is that I already know as much about my fate as I need to know. The day will come when I will die. So the only matter of consequence before me is what I will do with my allotted time. I can remain on shore, paralyzed with fear, or I can raise my sails and dip and soar in the breeze.”
    Richard Bode, First You Have to Row a Little Boat: Reflections on Life & Living

  • #3
    “A statue stands in a shaded place
    An angel girl with an upturned face
    A name is written on a polished rock
    A broken heart that the world forgot”
    Martina Mcbride

  • #4
    Jodi Picoult
    “Sometimes when you pick up your child you can feel the map of your own bones beneath your hands, or smell the scent of your skin in the nape of his neck. This is the most extraordinary thing about motherhood - finding a piece of yourself separate and apart that all the same you could not live without.”
    Jodi Picoult, Perfect Match

  • #5
    “New mothers enter the world of parenting feeling much like Alice in Wonderland.
    - Being a mother is one of the most rewarding jobs on earth and also one of the most challenging.
    - Motherhood is a process. Learn to love the process.
    - There is a tremendous amount of learning that takes place in the first year of your baby’s life; the baby learns a lot, too.
    - It is sometimes difficult to reconcile the fantasy of what you thuoght motherhood would be like, and what you thought you would be like as a mother, with reality.
    - Take care of yourself. If Mommy isn’t happy, no one else in the family is happy either.
    - New mother generally need to lower their expectations.
    - A good mother learns to love her child as he is and adjusts her mothering to suit her child.”
    Debra Gilbert Rosenberg

  • #6
    Barbara Kingsolver
    “A first child is your own best foot forward, and how you do cheer those little feet as they strike out. You examine every turn of flesh for precocity, and crow it to the world. But the last one: the baby who trails her scent like a flag of surrender through your life when there will be no more coming after--oh, that' s love by a different name.”
    Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

  • #7
    Zadie Smith
    “You don't have favourites among your children, but you do have allies. ”
    Zadie Smith, On Beauty

  • #8
    Rebecca Woolf
    “Thus far the mighty mystery of motherhood is this: How is it that doing it all feels like nothing is ever getting done.”
    Rebecca Woolf

  • #9
    “Supermom wasn't a bad job description. The pay was lousy if you were talking about real money. But the payoff was priceless in so many other ways.”
    Roxanne Henke

  • #10
    “I don’t think the world should assume that we are all natural mothers. And it does. I don’t think it’s such a big thing anymore, but the idea that you sacrifice everything for your children—it’s a load of rubbish. It leads to very destructive living and thinking, and it has a much worse effect on children than if you go out and live your own life. You’re meant to adore your children at all times, and you’re not meant to have a bad thought about them. That’s facism, you know, and it’s elevating the child at the expense of the mother. It’s like your life is not valid except in fulfilling this child’s needs. What about all your needs, your desires, your wants, your problems? They’re going to come out anyway, so it’s better they’re acknowledged straight off. Having said that, I really do believe that children have to be protected. They have to be loved. Somewhere between the two, I think, something needs to be sorted out. The relationship between parent and child is so difficult and so complex. There’s every emotion there. We mostly only acknowledge the good ones. If we were allowed to talk about the other ones, maybe it would alleviate them in some way”
    Marina Carr

  • #11
    Betty  Smith
    “It's come at last", she thought, "the time when you can no longer stand between your children and heartache.”
    Betty Smith, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

  • #12
    Sharon Creech
    “Being a mother is like trying to hold a wolf by the ears,” Gram said. “If you have three or four –or more – chickabiddies, you’re dancing on a hot griddle all the time. You don’t have time to think about anything else. And if you’ve only got one or two, it’s almost harder. You have room left over – empty spaces that you think you’ve got to fill up.”
    Sharon Creech, Walk Two Moons

  • #13
    Anita Diamant
    “I could not get my fill of looking.
    There should be a song for women to sing at this moment or a prayer to recite. But perhaps there is none because there are no words strong enough to name that moment.”
    Anita Diamant, The Red Tent

  • #14
    Rose Kennedy
    “I looked on child rearing not only as a work of love & duty but as a profession that was fully as interesting & challenging as any honorable profession in the world and one that demanded the best that I could bring to it.”
    Rose Kennedy

  • #15
    Margaret Sanger
    “The mother memories that are closest to my heart are the small gentle ones that I have carried over from the days of my childhood. They are not profound, but they have stayed with me through life, and when I am very old, they will still be near . . . Memories of mother drying my tears, reading aloud, cutting cookies and singing as she did, listening to prayers I said as I knelt with my forehead pressed against her knee, tucking me in bed and turning down the light. They have carried me through the years and given my life such a firm foundation that it does not rock beneath flood or tempest.”
    Margaret Sanger

  • #16
    Ayelet Waldman
    “Even if i'm setting myself up for failure, I think it's worth trying to be a mother who delights in who her children are, in their knock-knock jokes and earnest questions. A mother who spends less time obseessing about what will happen, or what has happened, and more time reveling in what is. A mother who doesn't fret over failings and slights, who realizes her worries and anxieties are just thoughts, the continuous chattering and judgement of a too busy mind. A mother who doesn't worry so much about being bad or good but just recognizes that she's both, and neither. A mother who does her best, and for whom that is good enough, even if, in the end, her best turns out to be, simply, not bad. ”
    Ayelet Waldman, Bad Mother: A Chronicle of Maternal Crimes, Minor Calamities, and Occasional Moments of Grace

  • #17
    Adriana Trigiani
    “The terrible things that happen to us in life never make any sense when we're in the middle of them, floundering, no end in sight. There is no rope to hang on to, it seems. Mothers can soothe children during those times, through their reassurance. No one worries about you like your mother, and when she is gone, the world seems unsafe, things that happen unwieldy. You cannot turn to her anymore, and it changes your life forever. There is no one on earth who knew you from the day you were born; who knew why you cried, or when you'd had enough food; who knew exactly what to say when you were hurting; and who encouraged you to grow a good heart. When that layer goes, whatever is left of your childgood goes with her. Memories are very different and cannot soothe you the same way her touch did.”
    Adriana Trigiani, Big Stone Gap

  • #18
    “A mother has far greater influence on her children than anyone else, and she must realize that every word she speaks, every act, every response, her attitude, even her appearance and manner of dress affect the lives of her children and the whole family. It is while the child is in the home that he gains from his mother the attitudes, hopes, and beliefs that will determine the kind of life he will live and the contribution he will make to society.”
    N. Eldon Tanner

  • #19
    Anne Fadiman
    “My daughter is seven, and some of the other second-grade parents complain that their children don't read for pleasure. When I visit their homes, the children's rooms are crammed with expensive books, but the parent's rooms are empty. Those children do not see their parents reading, as I did every day of my childhood. By contrast, when I walk into an apartment with books on the shelves, books on the bedside tables, books on the floor, and books on the toilet tank, then I know what I would see if I opened the door that says 'PRIVATE--GROWNUPS KEEP OUT': a child sprawled on the bed, reading.”
    Anne Fadiman, Ex Libris: Confessions of a Common Reader

  • #20
    Max Ehrmann
    “Go placidly amid the noise and the haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly, and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story. Be yourself. Especially do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love – for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you from misfortune. But do not distress yourself with imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labours and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world.”
    Max Ehrmann, Desiderata: A Poem for a Way of Life

  • #21
    Dean Koontz
    “Grief can destroy you --or focus you. You can decide a relationship was all for nothing if it had to end in death, and you alone. OR you can realize that every moment of it had more meaning than you dared to recognize at the time, so much meaning it scared you, so you just lived, just took for granted the love and laughter of each day, and didn't allow yourself to consider the sacredness of it. But when it's over and you're alone, you begin to see that it wasn't just a movie and a dinner together, not just watching sunsets together, not just scrubbing a floor or washing dishes together or worrying over a high electric bill. It was everything, it was the why of life, every event and precious moment of it. The answer to the mystery of existence is the love you shared sometimes so imperfectly, and when the loss wakes you to the deeper beauty of it, to the sanctity of it, you can't get off your knees for a long time, you're driven to your knees not by the weight of the loss but by gratitude for what preceded the loss. And the ache is always there, but one day not the emptiness, because to nurture the emptiness, to take solace in it, is to disrespect the gift of life.”
    Dean Koontz, Odd Hours

  • #22
    Lao Tzu
    “Be careful what you water your dreams with. Water them with worry and fear and you will produce weeds that choke the life from your dream. Water them with optimism and solutions and you will cultivate success. Always be on the lookout for ways to turn a problem into an opportunity for success. Always be on the lookout for ways to nurture your dream.”
    Lao Tzu

  • #23
    Richard Paul Evans
    “I am not a believer in love at first sight. For love, in its truest form, is not the thing
    of starry-eyed or star-crossed lovers, it is far more organic, requiring nurturing and time
    to fully bloom, and, as such, seen best not in its callow youth but in its wrinkled maturity.
    Like all living things, love, too, struggles against hardship, and in the process sheds
    its fatuous skin to expose one composed of more than just a storm of emotion–one of loyalty
    and divine friendship. Agape. And though it may be temporarily blinded by adversity,
    it never gives in or up, holding tight to lofty ideals that transcend this earth and
    time–while its counterfeit simply concludes it was mistaken and quickly runs off to
    find the next real thing.”
    Richard Paul Evans, The Letter
    tags: love

  • #24
    David Gemmell
    “Warriors fear surrender. They are proud and defiant. They will fight to the death for what they believe in. They will struggle to conquer. Love is not about conquest. The truth is a man can only find true love when he surrenders to it. When he opens his heart to the partner of his soul and says: 'here it is! the very essence of me! It is yours to nurture or destroy.”
    David Gemmell

  • #25
    John Lennon
    “Love is like a precious plant. You can't just accept it and leave it in the cupboard or just think it's going to get on by itself. You've got to keep on watering it. You've got to really look after it and nurture it.”
    John Lennon

  • #26
    M. Scott Peck
    “Love is the will to extend one's self for the purpose of nurturing one's own or another's spiritual growth... Love is as love does. Love is an act of will -- namely, both an intention and an action. Will also implies choice. We do not have to love. We choose to love.”
    M. Scott Peck

  • #27
    Leo Buscaglia
    “Never idealize others. They will never live up to your expectations. Don't over-analyze your relationships. Stop playing games. A growing relationship can only be nurtured by genuineness.”
    Leo Buscaglia

  • #28
    Anne Lamott
    “[Her] work taught me that you could be all the traditional feminine things -- a mother, a lover, a listener, a nurturer -- and you could also be critically astute and radical and have a minority opinion that was profoundly moral.”
    Anne Lamott, Traveling Mercies: Some Thoughts on Faith

  • #29
    Sidney Poitier
    “As I entered this world, I would leave behind the nurturing of my family and my home, but in another sense I would take their protection with me. The lessons I had learned, the feelings of groundedness and belonging that have been woven into my character there, would be my companions on the journey.”
    Sidney Poitier, The Measure of a Man: A Spiritual Autobiography

  • #30
    Cathy Lamb
    “Grab the love. Hold on tight. Treasure it. Put that love you have for your husband first, arrange everything else around it, and all else will work out. Love must be cradled and nurtured and enjoyed and danced with. Never, ever, forget the love. It's why we want to live.
    Aunt Lydia's character, Julia's Chocolates”
    Cathy Lamb



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