Carrie > Carrie's Quotes

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  • #1
    Victor Hugo
    “What Is Love? I have met in the streets a very poor young man who was in love. His hat was old, his coat worn, the water passed through his shoes and the stars through his soul”
    Victor Hugo


  • #2
    Victor Hugo
    “Nothing makes a man so adventurous as an empty pocket.”
    Victor Hugo, The Huntchback of Notre Dame


  • #3
    Victor Hugo
    “No army can withstand the strength of an idea whose time has come.”
    Victor Hugo


  • #4
    Ayn Rand
    “The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me.”
    Ayn Rand


  • #5
    P.J. O'Rourke
    “Always read stuff that will make you look good if you die in the middle of it.”
    P.J. O'Rourke


  • #6
    Groucho Marx
    “Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.”
    Groucho Marx, The Essential Groucho: Writings For By And About Groucho Marx


  • #7
    Mark Twain
    “Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.”
    Mark Twain


  • #8
    Albert Einstein
    “There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.”
    Albert Einstein


  • #9
    Oscar Wilde
    “Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination.”
    Oscar Wilde


  • #10
    Friedrich Nietzsche
    “The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. But no price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself.”
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  • #11
    Pierre-Joseph Proudhon
    “To be GOVERNED is to be watched, inspected, spied upon, directed, law-driven, numbered, regulated, enrolled, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, checked, estimated, valued, censured, commanded, by creatures who have neither the right nor the wisdom nor the virtue to do so. To be GOVERNED is to be at every operation, at every transaction noted, registered, counted, taxed, stamped, measured, numbered, assessed, licensed, authorized, admonished, prevented, forbidden, reformed, corrected, punished. It is, under pretext of public utility, and in the name of the general interest, to be place under contribution, drilled, fleeced, exploited, monopolized, extorted from, squeezed, hoaxed, robbed; then, at the slightest resistance, the first word of complaint, to be repressed, fined, vilified, harassed, hunted down, abused, clubbed, disarmed, bound, choked, imprisoned, judged, condemned, shot, deported, sacrificed, sold, betrayed; and to crown all, mocked, ridiculed, derided, outraged, dishonored. That is government; that is its justice; that is its morality."
    General Idea of the Revolution in the Nineteenth Century, translated by John Beverly Robinson (London: Freedom Press, 1923), pp. 293-294.”
    Pierre-Joseph Proudhon


  • #12
    Richard Brinsley Sheridan
    “Never say more than is necessary.”
    Richard Brinsley Sheridan


  • #13
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer
    “Principles are only tools in the hands of God; they will soon be thrown away when they are no longer useful.”
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Ethics


  • #14
    Mark Twain
    “In Paris they just simply opened their eyes and stared when we spoke to them in French! We never did succeed in making those idiots understand their own language.”
    Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad


  • #15
    Mark Twain
    “Occasionally, merely for the pleasure of being cruel, we put unoffending Frenchmen on the rack with questions framed in the incomprehensible jargon of their native language, and while they writhed, we impaled them, we peppered them, we scarified them, with their own vile verbs and participles.”
    Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad


  • #16
    G.K. Chesterton
    “The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of Conservatives is to prevent mistakes from being corrected. Even when the revolutionist might himself repent of his revolution, the traditionalist is already defending it as part of his tradition. Thus we have two great types -- the advanced person who rushes us into ruin, and the retrospective person who admires the ruins. He admires them especially by moonlight, not to say moonshine. Each new blunder of the progressive or prig becomes instantly a legend of immemorial antiquity for the snob. This is called the balance, or mutual check, in our Constitution.”
    G.K. Chesterton




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