Tim > Tim's Quotes

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  • #1
    “The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters. He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name's sake. Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me. Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies: thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over. Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the LORD forever.
    [Psalms 23]”
    Anonymous, Holy Bible: King James Version

  • #2
    T.S. Eliot
    “We shall not cease from exploration
    And the end of all our exploring
    Will be to arrive where we started
    And know the place for the first time.
    Through the unknown, remembered gate
    When the last of earth left to discover
    Is that which was the beginning;
    At the source of the longest river
    The voice of the hidden waterfall
    And the children in the apple-tree
    Not known, because not looked for
    But heard, half-heard, in the stillness
    Between two waves of the sea.”
    T.S. Eliot, Four Quartets

  • #3
    C.S. Lewis
    “When the time comes to you at which you will be forced at last to utter the speech which has lain at the center of your soul for years, which you have, all that time, idiot-like, been saying over and over, you'll not talk about the joy of words. I saw well why the gods do not speak to us openly, nor let us answer. Till that word can be dug out of us, why should they hear the babble that we think we mean? How can they meet us face to face till we have faces?”
    C.S. Lewis, Till We Have Faces

  • #4
    C.S. Lewis
    “If we find ourselves with a desire that nothing in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that we were made for another world.”
    C.S. Lewis

  • #5
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    “The more I love humanity in general the less I love man in particular. In my dreams, I often make plans for the service of humanity, and perhaps I might actually face crucifixion if it were suddenly necessary. Yet I am incapable of living in the same room with anyone for two days together. I know from experience. As soon as anyone is near me, his personality disturbs me and restricts my freedom. In twenty-four hours I begin to hate the best of men: one because he’s too long over his dinner, another because he has a cold and keeps on blowing his nose. I become hostile to people the moment they come close to me. But it has always happened that the more I hate men individually the more I love humanity.”
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

  • #6
    Herman Melville
    “Methinks we have hugely mistaken this matter of Life and Death. Methinks that what they call my shadow here on earth is my true substance. Methinks that in looking at things spiritual, we are too much like oysters observing the sun through the water, and thinking that thick water the thinnest of air. Me thinks my body is but the lees of my better being. In fact take my body who will, take it I say, it is not me.”
    Herman Melville, Moby Dick

  • #7
    Marilynne Robinson
    “That is how life goes--we send our children into the wilderness. Some of them on the day they are born, it seems, for all the help we can give them. Some of them seem to be a kind of wilderness unto themselves. But there must be angels there, too, and springs of water. Even that wilderness, the very habitation of jackals, is the Lord's.”
    Marilynne Robinson, Gilead

  • #8
    George Eliot
    “But the effect of her being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch

  • #9
    Terrence Malick
    “The nuns taught us there are two ways through life, the way of Nature and the way of Grace. You have to choose which one you'll follow.

    Grace doesn't try to please itself. Accepts being slighted, forgotten, disliked. Accepts insults and injuries.

    Nature only wants to please itself. Get others to please it too. Likes to lord it over them. To have its own way. It finds reasons to be unhappy when all the world is shining around it. And love is smiling through all things.”
    Terrence Malick, The Tree of Life

  • #10
    G.K. Chesterton
    “The way to love anything is to realize that it may be lost.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #11
    Jane Austen
    “Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised or a little mistaken.”
    Jane Austen, Emma

  • #13
    Augustine of Hippo
    “Thou hast made us for thyself, O Lord, and our heart is restless until it finds its rest in thee.”
    Augustine of Hippo, Confessions

  • #15
    Charles Dickens
    “So, throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise.”
    Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

  • #17
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    “In every idea of genius or in every new human idea, or, more simply still, in every serious human idea born in anyone's brain, there is something that cannot possibly be conveyed to others.”
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Idiot

  • #17
    C.S. Lewis
    “Reality, in fact, is usually something you could not have guessed. That is one of the reasons I believe Christianity. It is a religion you could not have guessed. If it offered us just the kind of universe we had always expected, I should feel we were making it up. But, in fact, it is not the sort of thing anyone would have made up. It has just that queer twist about it that real things have. So let us leave behind all these boys' philosophies--these over simple answers. The problem is not simple and the answer is not going to be simple either.”
    C.S. Lewis

  • #17
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    “Gentlemen, let us suppose that man is not stupid. (Indeed one cannot refuse to suppose that, if only from the one consideration, that, if man is stupid, then who is wise?) But if he is not stupid, he is monstrously ungrateful! Phenomenally ungrateful. In fact, I believe that the best definition of man is the ungrateful biped.”
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

  • #19
    Marilynne Robinson
    “They say an infant can't see when it is as young as your sister was, but she opened her eyes, and she looked at me. She was such a little bit of a thing. But while I was holding her, she opened her eyes. I know she didn't really study my face. Memory can make a thing seem to have been much more than it was. But I know she did look right into my eyes. That is something. And I'm glad I knew it at the time, because now, in my present situation, not that I am about to leave this world, I realize there is nothing more astonishing than a human face...You feel your obligation to a child when you have seen it and held it. Any human face is a claim on you, because you can't help but understand the singularity of it, the courage and loneliness of it. But this is truest of the face of an infant. I consider that to be one kind of vision, as mystical as any.”
    Marilynne Robinson, Gilead

  • #20
    “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.”
    Anonymous, Holy Bible: New International Version

  • #21
    C.S. Lewis
    “Holy places are dark places. It is life and strength, not knowledge and words, that we get in them. Holy wisdom is not clear and thin like water, but thick and dark like blood.”
    C.S. Lewis, Till We Have Faces

  • #21
    “But he was pierced for our transgressions,
    he was crushed for our iniquities;
    the punishment that brought us peace was upon him,
    and by his wounds we are healed.”
    Anonymous, Holy Bible: King James Version

  • #22
    Bob Dylan
    “He not busy being born is busy dying.”
    Bob Dylan

  • #22
    Marilynne Robinson
    “I’m not going to force some theory on a mystery and make foolishness of it, just because that is what people who talk about it normally do.”
    Marilynne Robinson, Gilead

  • #23
    Marilynne Robinson
    “If you want to inform yourselves as to the nature of hell, don't hold your hand in a candle flame, just ponder the meanest, most desolate place in your soul.”
    Marilynne Robinson, Gilead

  • #24
    Cormac McCarthy
    “Things separate from their stories have no meaning. They are only shapes.”
    Cormac McCarthy, The Crossing

  • #26
    Joseph Heller
    “You know, that might be the answer – to act boastfully about something we ought to be ashamed of. That’s a trick that never seems to fail.”
    Joseph Heller, Catch-22

  • #27
    William Faulkner
    “You get born and you try this and you don't know why only you keep on trying it and you are born at the same time with a lot of other people, all mixed up with them, like trying to, having to, move your arms and legs with strings only the same strings are hitched to all the other arms and legs and the others all trying and they don't know why either except that the strings are all in one another's way like five or six people all trying to make a rug on the same loom only each one wants to weave his own pattern into the rug; and it can't matter, you know that, or the Ones that set up the loom would have arranged things a little better, and yet it must matter because you keep on trying or having to keep on trying and then all of a sudden it's all over.”
    William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom!

  • #27
    Graham Greene
    “When you visualized a man or a woman carefully, you could always begin to feel pity . . . that was a quality God's image carried with it . . . when you saw the lines at the corners of the eyes, the shape of the mouth, how the hair grew, it was impossible to hate. Hate was just a failure of imagination.”
    Graham Greene, The Power and the Glory

  • #28
    Cormac McCarthy
    “Then they set out along the blacktop in the gunmetal light, shuffling through the ash, each the other's world entire.”
    Cormac McCarthy, The Road

  • #30
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “If personality is an unbroken series of successful gestures, then there was something gorgeous about him, some heightened sensitivity to the promises of life, as if he were related to one of those intricate machines that register earthquakes ten thousand miles away. This responsiveness had nothing to do with that flabby impressionability which is dignified under the name of the "creative temperament"--it was an extraordinary gift for hope, a romantic readiness such as I have never found in any other person and which it is not likely I shall ever find again. No--Gatsby turned out all right at the end; it is what preyed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dreams that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  • #30
    G.K. Chesterton
    “There again," said Syme irritably, "what is there poetical about being in revolt? You might as well say that it is poetical to be sea-sick. Being sick is a revolt. Both being sick and being rebellious may be the wholesome thing on certain desperate occasions; but I'm hanged if I can see why they are poetical...It is things going right," he cried, "that is poetical! Our digestions, for instance, going sacredly and silently right, that is the foundation of all poetry...the most poetical thing in the world is not being sick.”
    G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Was Thursday: A Nightmare

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