Tim > Tim's Quotes

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  • #1
    T.S. Eliot
    “We shall not cease from exploration
    And the end of all our exploring
    Will be to arrive where we started
    And know the place for the first time.
    Through the unknown, remembered gate
    When the last of earth left to discover
    Is that which was the beginning;
    At the source of the longest river
    The voice of the hidden waterfall
    And the children in the apple-tree
    Not known, because not looked for
    But heard, half-heard, in the stillness
    Between two waves of the sea.”
    T.S. Eliot, Four Quartets


  • #2
    C.S. Lewis
    “If we find ourselves with a desire that nothing in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that we were made for another world.”
    C.S. Lewis


  • #3
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    “What is hell? I maintain that it is the suffering of being unable to love.”
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov


  • #4
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    “I love mankind, he said, "but I find to my amazement that the more I love mankind as a whole, the less I love man in particular.”
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov


  • #5
    G.K. Chesterton
    “The way to love anything is to realize that it may be lost.”
    G.K. Chesterton


  • #6
    Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
    “It is not the responsibility of knights errant to discover whether the afflicted, the enchained and the oppressed whom they encounter on the road are reduced to these circumstances and suffer this distress for their vices, or for their virtues: the knight's sole responsibility is to succour them as people in need, having eyes only for their sufferings, not for their misdeeds.”
    Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quixote


  • #7
    C.S. Lewis
    “Reality, in fact, is usually something you could not have guessed. That is one of the reasons I believe Christianity. It is a religion you could not have guessed. If it offered us just the kind of universe we had always expected, I should feel we were making it up. But, in fact, it is not the sort of thing anyone would have made up. It has just that queer twist about it that real things have. So let us leave behind all these boys' philosophies--these over simple answers. The problem is not simple and the answer is not going to be simple either.”
    C.S. Lewis


  • #8
    William Faulkner
    “You get born and you try this and you don't know why only you keep on trying it and you are born at the same time with a lot of other people, all mixed up with them, like trying to, having to, move your arms and legs with strings only the same strings are hitched to all the other arms and legs and the others all trying and they don't know why either except that the strings are all in one another's way like five or six people all trying to make a rug on the same loom only each one wants to weave his own pattern into the rug; and it can't matter, you know that, or the Ones that set up the loom would have arranged things a little better, and yet it must matter because you keep on trying or having to keep on trying and then all of a sudden it's all over.”
    William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom!


  • #9
    Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
    “When you're cold, don't expect sympathy from someone who's warm.”
    Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich


  • #10
    C.S. Lewis
    “When the time comes to you at which you will be forced at last to utter the speech which has lain at the center of your soul for years, which you have, all that time, idiot-like, been saying over and over, you'll not talk about the joy of words. I saw well why the gods do not speak to us openly, nor let us answer. Till that word can be dug out of us, why should they hear the babble that we think we mean? How can they meet us face to face till we have faces?”
    C.S. Lewis, Till We Have Faces


  • #11
    Madeleine L'Engle
    “Humility is throwing oneself away in complete concentration on something or someone else.”
    Madeleine L'Engle


  • #12
    Neil Postman
    “We were keeping our eye on 1984. When the year came and the prophecy didn't, thoughtful Americans sang softly in praise of themselves. The roots of liberal democracy had held. Wherever else the terror had happened, we, at least, had not been visited by Orwellian nightmares.

    But we had forgotten that alongside Orwell's dark vision, there was another - slightly older, slightly less well known, equally chilling: Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Contrary to common belief even among the educated, Huxley and Orwell did not prophesy the same thing. Orwell warns that we will be overcome by an externally imposed oppression. But in Huxley's vision, no Big Brother is required to deprive people of their autonomy, maturity and history. As he saw it, people will come to love their oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their capacities to think.

    What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny "failed to take into account man's almost infinite appetite for distractions." In 1984, Orwell added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we desire will ruin us.

    This book is about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell, was right.”
    Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business


  • #13
    Toni Morrison
    “There is a loneliness that can be rocked. Arms crossed, knees drawn up, holding, holding on, this motion, unlike a ship's, smooths and contains the rocker. It's an inside kind--wrapped tight like skin. Then there is the loneliness that roams. No rocking can hold it down. It is alive. On its own. A dry and spreading thing that makes the sound of one's own feet going seem to come from a far-off place.”
    Toni Morrison, Beloved


  • #14
    Franz Schubert
    “No one feels another's grief, no one understands another's joy. People imagine that they can reach one another. In reality they only pass each other by.”
    Franz Schubert


  • #15
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “The matter is quite simple. The bible is very easy to understand. But we Christians are a bunch of scheming swindlers. We pretend to be unable to understand it because we know very well that the minute we understand, we are obliged to act accordingly. Take any words in the New Testament and forget everything except pledging yourself to act accordingly. My God, you will say, if I do that my whole life will be ruined. How would I ever get on in the world? Herein lies the real place of Christian scholarship. Christian scholarship is the Church’s prodigious invention to defend itself against the Bible, to ensure that we can continue to be good Christians without the Bible coming too close. Oh, priceless scholarship, what would we do without you? Dreadful it is to fall into the hands of the living God. Yes it is even dreadful to be alone with the New Testament.”
    Søren Kierkegaard, Provocations: Spiritual Writings of Kierkegaard


  • #16
    Augustine of Hippo
    “Faith is to believe what you do not yet see; the reward for this faith is to see what you believe.”
    Augustine of Hippo


  • #17
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    “The more conscious I was of goodness and of all that was 'sublime and beautiful,'the more deeply I sank into my mire and the more ready I was to sink in it altogether.”
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground


  • #18
    Lewis Carroll
    “If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn't. And contrary wise, what is, it wouldn't be. And what it wouldn't be, it would. You see?”
    Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass


  • #19
    Augustine of Hippo
    “Because God has made us for Himself, our hearts are restless until they rest in Him.”
    Augustine of Hippo


  • #20
    Aldous Huxley
    “The soul of wit may become the very body of untruth. However elegant and memorable, brevity can never, in the nature of things, do justice to all the facts of a complex situations. On such a theme one can be brief only by omission and simplification. Omission and simplification help us to understand - but help is, in many cases, to understand the wrong thing; for our comprehension may be only of the abbreviator's neatly formulated notions, not of the vast, ramifying reality from which these notions have been so arbitrarily abstracted.”
    Aldous Huxley, Brave New World Revisited


  • #21
    Cormac McCarthy
    “Things separate from their stories have no meaning. They are only shapes.”
    Cormac McCarthy, The Crossing


  • #22
    Maya Angelou
    “Music was my refuge. I could crawl into the space between the notes and curl my back to loneliness.”
    Maya Angelou


  • #23
    Bob Dylan
    “He not busy being born is busy dying.”
    Bob Dylan


  • #24
    G.K. Chesterton
    “Men do not differ much about what things they will call evils; they differ enormously about what evils they will call excusable.”
    G.K. Chesterton


  • #25
    Graham Greene
    “When you visualized a man or a woman carefully, you could always begin to feel pity . . . that was a quality God's image carried with it . . . when you saw the lines at the corners of the eyes, the shape of the mouth, how the hair grew, it was impossible to hate. Hate was just a failure of imagination.”
    Graham Greene, The Power and the Glory


  • #26
    G.K. Chesterton
    “There again," said Syme irritably, "what is there poetical about being in revolt? You might as well say that it is poetical to be sea-sick. Being sick is a revolt. Both being sick and being rebellious may be the wholesome thing on certain desperate occasions; but I'm hanged if I can see why they are poetical...It is things going right," he cried, "that is poetical! Our digestions, for instance, going sacredly and silently right, that is the foundation of all poetry...the most poetical thing in the world is not being sick.”
    G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Was Thursday


  • #27
    Cormac McCarthy
    “Men do not turn from God so easily. Not so easily. Deep in each man is the knowledge that something knows of his existence. Something knows, and cannot e fled nor hid from. To imagine otherwise is to imagine the unspeakable. It was never that this man ceased to believe in God. No. It was rather that he came to believe terrible things of him.”
    Cormac McCarthy, The Crossing


  • #28
    Emily Dickinson
    “If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can warm me, I know that is poetry. If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry. These are the only ways I know it. Is there any other way?”
    Emily Dickinson, Selected Letters


  • #29
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    “The more I love humanity in general the less I love man in particular. In my dreams, I often make plans for the service of humanity, and perhaps I might actually face crucifixion if it were suddenly necessary. Yet I am incapable of living in the same room with anyone for two days together. I know from experience. As soon as anyone is near me, his personality disturbs me and restricts my freedom. In twenty-four hours I begin to hate the best of men: one because he’s too long over his dinner, another because he has a cold and keeps on blowing his nose. I become hostile to people the moment they come close to me. But it has always happened that the more I hate men individually the more I love humanity.”
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov


  • #30
    T.S. Eliot
    “Half the harm that is done in this world is due to people who want to feel important. They don't mean to do harm; but the harm does not interest them. Or they do not see it, or they justify it because they are absorbed in the endless struggle to think well of themselves.”
    T.S. Eliot




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