Charles Egan > Charles's Quotes

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  • #1
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “The Road goes ever on and on
    Down from the door where it began.
    Now far ahead the Road has gone,
    And I must follow, if I can,
    Pursuing it with eager feet,
    Until it joins some larger way
    Where many paths and errands meet.
    And whither then? I cannot say”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring


  • #2
    Rudyard Kipling
    “If you can keep your head when all about you
    Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
    If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
    But make allowance for their doubting too;

    If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
    Or being lied about, don't deal in lies,
    Or being hated, don't give way to hating,
    And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise

    If you can dream - and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think - and not make thoughts your aim;
    If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same;

    If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
    Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
    Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
    And stoop and build 'em up with worn-out tools

    If you can make one heap of all your winnings
    And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
    And lose, and start again at your beginnings
    And never breathe a word about your loss;

    If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
    To serve your turn long after they are gone,
    And so hold on when there is nothing in you
    Except the will which says to them: 'Hold on!'

    If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
    Or walk with Kings - nor lose the common touch,
    If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
    If all men count with you, but none too much;

    If you can fill the unforgiving minute
    With sixty seconds' worth of distance run,
    Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
    And - which is more - you'll be a Man, my son!”
    Rudyard Kipling, If: A Father's Advice to His Son


  • #3
    Rudyard Kipling
    “For the strength of the Pack is the Wolf, and the strength of the Wolf is the Pack.”
    Rudyard Kipling, The Jungle Book


  • #4
    Rudyard Kipling
    “War is an ill thing, as I surely know. But 'twould be an ill world for weaponless dreamers if evil men were not now and then slain.”
    Rudyard Kipling


  • #5
    Rudyard Kipling
    “A man can never have too much red wine, too many books, or too much ammunition”
    Rudyard Kipling


  • #6
    Ernest Hemingway
    “Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know.”
    Ernest Hemingway


  • #7
    Ernest Hemingway
    “Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut.”
    Ernest Hemingway


  • #8
    Ernest Hemingway
    “If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.”
    Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms


  • #9
    Ernest Hemingway
    “It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.”
    Ernest Hemingway


  • #10
    John Steinbeck
    “And this I believe: that the free, exploring mind of the individual human is the most valuable thing in the world. And this I would fight for: the freedom of the mind to take any direction it wishes, undirected. And this I must fight against: any idea, religion, or government which limits or destroys the individual. This is what I am and what I am about.”
    John Steinbeck, East of Eden


  • #11
    Robert A. Heinlein
    “A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.”
    Robert A. Heinlein
    tags: rah


  • #12
    Robert A. Heinlein
    “I am free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.”
    Robert A. Heinlein


  • #13
    Robert A. Heinlein
    “Progress isn't made by early risers. It's made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something.”
    Robert A. Heinlein


  • #14
    Robert A. Heinlein
    “Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.”
    Robert A. Heinlein


  • #15
    Robert A. Heinlein
    “Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done, and why. Then do it.”
    Robert A. Heinlein, Time Enough for Love


  • #16
    Robert A. Heinlein
    “Sin lies only in hurting others unnecessarily. All other "sins" are invented nonsense.”
    Robert A. Heinlein


  • #17
    Robert A. Heinlein
    “There is no worse tyranny than to force a man to pay for what he does not want merely because you think it would be good for him.”
    Robert A. Heinlein, The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress


  • #18
    Robert A. Heinlein
    “Yield to temptation...it may not pass your way again!”
    Robert A. Heinlein


  • #19
    Robert A. Heinlein
    “An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life.”
    Robert A. Heinlein, Beyond This Horizon


  • #20
    Isaac Asimov
    “The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds the most discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found it!) but 'That's funny...”
    Isaac Asimov


  • #21
    Isaac Asimov
    “Never let your sense of morals prevent you from doing what is right.”
    Isaac Asimov, Foundation


  • #22
    Isaac Asimov
    “Creationists make it sound as though a 'theory' is something you dreamt up after being drunk all night.”
    Isaac Asimov


  • #23
    Isaac Asimov
    “Self-education is, I firmly believe, the only kind of education there is.”
    Isaac Asimov


  • #24
    Thomas Jefferson
    “I predict future happiness for Americans, if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.”
    Thomas Jefferson


  • #25
    Thomas Jefferson
    “Do you want to know who you are? Don't ask. Act! Action will delineate and define you.”
    Thomas Jefferson


  • #26
    Thomas Jefferson
    “I sincerely believe that banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies, and that the principle of spending money to be paid by posterity, under the name of funding, is but swindling futurity on a large scale.”
    Thomas Jefferson


  • #27
    Thomas Jefferson
    “I have observed, indeed, generally, that while in protestant countries the defections from the Platonic Christianity of the priests is to Deism, in catholic countries they are to Atheism. Diderot, D'Alembert, D’Holbach, Condorcet, are known to have been among the most virtuous of men. Their virtue, then, must have had some other foundation than the love of God.

    [Letter to Thomas Law, 13 June 1814]”
    Thomas Jefferson, Letters of Thomas Jefferson


  • #28
    Thomas Jefferson
    “We in America do not have government by the majority. We have government by the majority who participate.”
    Thomas Jefferson


  • #29
    Thomas Jefferson
    “4. Religion. Your reason is now mature enough to examine this object. In the first place, divest yourself of all bias in favor of novelty & singularity of opinion... shake off all the fears & servile prejudices, under which weak minds are servilely crouched. Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call to her tribunal every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear. You will naturally examine first, the religion of your own country. Read the Bible, then as you would read Livy or Tacitus. The facts which are within the ordinary course of nature, you will believe on the authority of the writer, as you do those of the same kind in Livy and Tacitus. The testimony of the writer weighs in their favor, in one scale, and their not being against the laws of nature, does not weigh against them. But those facts in the Bible which contradict the laws of nature, must be examined with more care, and under a variety of faces. Here you must recur to the pretensions of the writer to inspiration from God. Examine upon what evidence his pretensions are founded, and whether that evidence is so strong, as that its falsehood would be more improbable than a change in the laws of nature, in the case he relates. For example in the book of Joshua we are told the sun stood still several hours. Were we to read that fact in Livy or Tacitus we should class it with their showers of blood, speaking of statues, beasts, &c. But it is said that the writer of that book was inspired. Examine therefore candidly what evidence there is of his having been inspired. The pretension is entitled to your inquiry, because millions believe it. On the other hand you are astronomer enough to know how contrary it is to the law of nature that a body revolving on its axis as the earth does, should have stopped, should not by that sudden stoppage have prostrated animals, trees, buildings, and should after a certain time have resumed its revolution, & that without a second general prostration. Is this arrest of the earth's motion, or the evidence which affirms it, most within the law of probabilities? You will next read the New Testament. It is the history of a personage called Jesus. Keep in your eye the opposite pretensions: 1, of those who say he was begotten by God, born of a virgin, suspended & reversed the laws of nature at will, & ascended bodily into heaven; and 2, of those who say he was a man of illegitimate birth, of a benevolent heart, enthusiastic mind, who set out without pretensions to divinity, ended in believing them, and was punished capitally for sedition, by being gibbeted, according to the Roman law, which punished the first commission of that offence by whipping, & the second by exile, or death in fureâ.

    ...Do not be frightened from this inquiry by any fear of its consequences. If it ends in a belief that there is no God, you will find incitements to virtue in the comfort and pleasantness you feel in its exercise, and the love of others which it will procure you... In fine, I repeat, you must lay aside all prejudice on both sides, and neither believe nor reject anything, because any other persons, or description of persons, have rejected or believed it... I forgot to observe, when speaking of the New Testament, that you should read all the histories of Christ, as well of those whom a council of ecclesiastics have decided for us, to be Pseudo-evangelists, as those they named Evangelists. Because these Pseudo-evangelists pretended to inspiration, as much as the others, and you are to judge their pretensions by your own reason, and not by the reason of those ecclesiastics. Most of these are lost...

    [Letter to his nephew, Peter Carr, advising him in matters of religion, 1787]”
    Thomas Jefferson, Letters of Thomas Jefferson


  • #30
    James Madison
    “I believe there are more instances of the abridgment of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments of those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations.”
    James Madison




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