Jayaprakash Satyamurthy > Jayaprakash's Quotes

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  • #1
    Georges Simenon
    “I would like to carve my novel in a piece of wood. My characters—I would like to have them heavier, more three-dimensional ... My characters have a profession, have characteristics; you know their age, their family situation, and everything. But I try to make each one of those characters heavy, like a statue, and to be the brother of everybody in the world.”
    Georges Simenon

  • #2
    Thomas Mann
    “There is only one real misfortune: to forfeit one's own good opinion of oneself. Lose your complacency, once betray your own self-contempt and the world will unhesitatingly endorse it.”
    Thomas Mann

  • #3
    John Milton
    “I will not deny but that the best apology against false accusers is silence and sufferance, and honest deeds set against dishonest words.”
    John Milton

  • #4
    Rohinton Mistry
    “Everyone underestimates their own life. Funny thing is, in the end, all our stories...they're the same. In fact, no matter where you go in the world, there is only one important story: of youth, loss and yearning for redemption. So we tell the same story, over and over. Only the details are different. ”
    Rohinton Mistry, Family Matters

  • #5
    Oscar Wilde
    “I am so clever that sometimes I don't understand a single word of what I am saying.”
    Oscar Wilde, The Happy Prince and Other Stories

  • #6
    “Go your way, seducers, flatterers, idlers, those glib of tongue and charlatans; I am not a seed that you can force to grow; my goal differs so from yours that I would be wasting my time in trying to explain where my inclination drives me. ”
    Dominique Fernandez, Porporino: Or, The secrets of Naples

  • #7
    Fred Chappell
    “In an almost totally insentient cosmos only human feeling is interesting or relevant to what the soul searches for...suffering is the most expensive of human emotions, but it is the most intense and precious of them, because suffering most efficiently humanizes the unfeeling universe.”
    Fred Chappell, Dagon

  • #8
    James Sallis
    “Mostly what you lose with time, in memory, is the specificity of things, their exact sequence. It all runs together, becomes a watery soup. Portmanteau days, imploded years. Like a bad actor, memory always goes for effect, abjuring motivation, consistency, good sense. ”
    James Sallis, Black Hornet

  • #9
    James Sallis
    “I was coming up on a cross street when a man wearing a filthy suit stepped out from around the corner of the building ahead and directly into my path. Bent with age, he turned bleak red eyes to me and stared. Pressed with his chest to both hands he carried a paperback book as soiled and bereft as his suit. Are you one of the real ones or not? he demanded. And after a moment, when I failed to answer, he walked on, resuming his sotto voce conversation.

    A chill passed through me. Somehow, indefinably, I felt, felt with the kind of baffled, tacit understanding that we have in dreams , that I had just glimpsed one possible future self. ”
    James Sallis, Black Hornet

  • #10
    Raymond Chandler
    “Its big men are mostly little men with fancy offices and a lot of money. A great many of them are stupid little men, with reach-me-down brains, small-town arrogance and a sort of animal knack of smelling out the taste of the stupidest part of the public. They have played in luck so long that they have come to mistake luck for enlightenment." - on Hollywood”
    Raymond Chandler, The Notebooks of Raymond Chandler; and English Summer: A Gothic Romance

  • #11
    W.G. Sebald
    “At the most we gaze at it in wonder, a kind of wonder which in itself is a form of dawning horror, for somehow we know by instinct that outsize buildings cast the shadow of their own destruction before them, and are designed from the first with an eye to their later existence as ruins.”
    W.G. Sebald, Austerlitz

  • #12
    W.G. Sebald
    “It is thanks to my evening reading alone that I am still more or less sane.”
    W.G. Sebald, Vertigo

  • #13
    W.G. Sebald
    “Only in the books written in earlier times did she sometimes think she found some faint idea of what it might be like to be alive.”
    W.G. Sebald, Austerlitz

  • #14
    W.G. Sebald
    “How happily, said Austerlitz, have I sat over a book in the deepening twilight until I could no longer make out the words and my mind began to wander, and how secure have I felt seated at the desk in my house in the dark night, just watching the tip of my pencil in the lamplight following its shadow, as if of its own accord and with perfect fidelity, while that shadow moved regularly from left to right, line by line, over the ruled paper.”
    W.G. Sebald, Austerlitz

  • #15
    W.G. Sebald
    “No matter whether one is flying over Newfoundland or the sea of lights that stretches from Boston to Philadelphia after nightfall, over the Arabian deserts which gleam like mother-of-pearl, over the Ruhr or the city of Frankfurt, it is as though there were no people, only the things they have made and in which they are hiding.”
    W.G. Sebald, The Rings of Saturn

  • #16
    W.G. Sebald
    “We take almost all the decisive steps in our lives as a result of slight inner adjustments of which we are barely conscious.”
    W.G. Sebald, Austerlitz

  • #17
    W.G. Sebald
    “I felt that the decrepit state of these once magnificent buildings, with their broken gutters, walls blackened by rainwater, crumbling plaster revealing the coarse masonry beneath it, windows boarded up or clad with corrugated iron, precisely reflected my own state of mind...”
    W.G. Sebald, Austerlitz

  • #18
    W.G. Sebald
    “It seems to me then as if all the moments of our life occupy the same space, as if future events already existed and were only waiting for us to find our way to them at last, just as when we have accepted an invitation we duly arrive in a certain house at a given time.”
    W.G. Sebald, Austerlitz
    tags: time

  • #19
    W.G. Sebald
    “Like our bodies and like our desires, the machines we have devised are possessed of a heart which is slowly reduced to embers.”
    W.G. Sebald, The Rings of Saturn

  • #20
    W.G. Sebald
    “…the longer I think about it the more it seems to me that we who are still alive are unreal in the eyes of the dead, that only occasionally, in certain lights and atmospheric conditions, do we appear in their field of vision.”
    W.G. Sebald, Austerlitz
    tags: death, life

  • #21
    Javier Marías
    “One of the best possible perspectives from which to tell a story is that of a ghost, someone who is dead but can still witness.”
    Javier Marías

  • #22
    Nicholson Baker
    “You need the art in order to love the life.”
    Nicholson Baker, The Anthologist

  • #23
    Caitlín R. Kiernan
    “I need a world filled with wonder, with awe, with awful things. I couldn't exist in a world devoid of marvels, even if the marvels are terrible marvels. Even if they frighten me to consider them.”
    Caitlín R. Kiernan

  • #24
    Marianne Moore
    “Do the poet and scientist not work analogously? Both are willing to waste effort. To be hard on himself is one ...of the main strengths of each. Each is attentive to clues, each must narrow the choice, must strive for precision. As George Grosz says, “In art there is no place for gossip and but a small place for the satirist.” The objective is fertile procedure. Is it not? Jacob Bronowski says in The Saturday Evening Post that science is not a mere collection of discoveries, but that science is the process of discovering. In any case it’s not established once and for all; it’s evolving.”
    Marianne Moore

  • #25
    Jeff VanderMeer
    “Whenever I write first drafts, I like to maximize the possibility of f-ups, mistakes, mis-written words, digressions, crazy changes in tone, etc. This is why I don't use outlining software or even a computer and why I spread pages and images and research materials kinda crazy across the table. Never know what'll happen.”
    Jeff VanderMeer

  • #26
    Virginia Woolf
    “Writing is like sex. First you do it for love, then you do it for your friends, and then you do it for money.”
    Virginia Woolf

  • #27
    Javier Marías
    “One should never tell anyone anything or give information or pass on stories or make people remember beings who have never existed or trodden the earth or traversed the world or who, having done so, are now almost safe in uncertain, one-eyed oblivion. Telling is almost always done as a gift, even when the story contains and injects some poison, it is also a bond, a granting of trust, and rare is the trust or confidence that is not sooner or later betrayed, rare is the close bond that does not grow twisted or knotted and, in the end become so tangled that a razor or knife is needed to cut it.”
    Javier Marías, Fever and Spear

  • #28
    Dashiell Hammett
    “So that's the way you scientific detectives work. My god! for a fat, middle-aged, hard-boiled, pig-headed guy, you've got the vaguest way of doing things I ever heard of.”
    Dashiell Hammett, Red Harvest

  • #29
    Jim Thompson
    “We're living in a funny world kid, a peculiar civilization. The police are playing crooks in it, and the crooks are doing police duty. The politicians are preachers, and the preachers are politicians. The tax collectors collect for themselves. The Bad People want us to have more dough, and the good people are fighting to keep it from us. It's not good for us, know what I mean? If we had all we wanted to eat, we'd eat too much. We'd have inflation in the toilet paper industry. That's the way I understand it. That's about the size of some of the arguments I've heard.”
    Jim Thompson, The Killer Inside Me

  • #30
    John D. MacDonald
    “Bugs would eat the wax. Chaw the old canvas. And one day there will be a mutation, and we will have new ones that can digest concrete, dissolve steel and suck up the acid puddles, fatten on magic plastics, lick their slow way through glass. Then the cities will tumble and man will be chased back into the sea from which he came...”
    John D. MacDonald, The Deep Blue Good-By



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