Emma Lions > Emma's Quotes

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  • #1
    Martin Luther King Jr.
    “Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.”
    Martin Luther King Jr., A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings and Speeches

  • #2
    Maya Angelou
    “There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.”
    Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

  • #3
    John F. Kennedy
    “The Chinese use two brush strokes to write the word 'crisis.' One brush stroke stands for danger; the other for opportunity. In a crisis, be aware of the danger--but recognize the opportunity.”
    John F. Kennedy

  • #4
    Saul Bellow
    “You never have to change anything you got up in the middle of the night to write.”
    Saul Bellow

  • #5
    Oscar Wilde
    “Those who find ugly meanings in beautiful things are corrupt without being charming. This is a fault. Those who find beautiful meanings in beautiful things are the cultivated. For these there is hope. They are the elect to whom beautiful things mean only Beauty. There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written, or badly written. That is all.”
    Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

  • #6
    Rosemarie Urquico
    “You should date a girl who reads.
    Date a girl who reads. Date a girl who spends her money on books instead of clothes, who has problems with closet space because she has too many books. Date a girl who has a list of books she wants to read, who has had a library card since she was twelve.

    Find a girl who reads. You’ll know that she does because she will always have an unread book in her bag. She’s the one lovingly looking over the shelves in the bookstore, the one who quietly cries out when she has found the book she wants. You see that weird chick sniffing the pages of an old book in a secondhand book shop? That’s the reader. They can never resist smelling the pages, especially when they are yellow and worn.

    She’s the girl reading while waiting in that coffee shop down the street. If you take a peek at her mug, the non-dairy creamer is floating on top because she’s kind of engrossed already. Lost in a world of the author’s making. Sit down. She might give you a glare, as most girls who read do not like to be interrupted. Ask her if she likes the book.

    Buy her another cup of coffee.

    Let her know what you really think of Murakami. See if she got through the first chapter of Fellowship. Understand that if she says she understood James Joyce’s Ulysses she’s just saying that to sound intelligent. Ask her if she loves Alice or she would like to be Alice.

    It’s easy to date a girl who reads. Give her books for her birthday, for Christmas, for anniversaries. Give her the gift of words, in poetry and in song. Give her Neruda, Pound, Sexton, Cummings. Let her know that you understand that words are love. Understand that she knows the difference between books and reality but by god, she’s going to try to make her life a little like her favorite book. It will never be your fault if she does.

    She has to give it a shot somehow.

    Lie to her. If she understands syntax, she will understand your need to lie. Behind words are other things: motivation, value, nuance, dialogue. It will not be the end of the world.

    Fail her. Because a girl who reads knows that failure always leads up to the climax. Because girls who read understand that all things must come to end, but that you can always write a sequel. That you can begin again and again and still be the hero. That life is meant to have a villain or two.

    Why be frightened of everything that you are not? Girls who read understand that people, like characters, develop. Except in the Twilight series.

    If you find a girl who reads, keep her close. When you find her up at 2 AM clutching a book to her chest and weeping, make her a cup of tea and hold her. You may lose her for a couple of hours but she will always come back to you. She’ll talk as if the characters in the book are real, because for a while, they always are.

    You will propose on a hot air balloon. Or during a rock concert. Or very casually next time she’s sick. Over Skype.

    You will smile so hard you will wonder why your heart hasn’t burst and bled out all over your chest yet. You will write the story of your lives, have kids with strange names and even stranger tastes. She will introduce your children to the Cat in the Hat and Aslan, maybe in the same day. You will walk the winters of your old age together and she will recite Keats under her breath while you shake the snow off your boots.

    Date a girl who reads because you deserve it. You deserve a girl who can give you the most colorful life imaginable. If you can only give her monotony, and stale hours and half-baked proposals, then you’re better off alone. If you want the world and the worlds beyond it, date a girl who reads.

    Or better yet, date a girl who writes.”
    Rosemarie Urquico

  • #7
    Stephen King
    “Both Rowling and Meyer, they’re speaking directly to young people. … The real difference is that Jo Rowling is a terrific writer and Stephenie Meyer can’t write worth a darn. She’s not very good.”
    Stephen King

  • #8
    Stephen King
    “Fiction is the truth inside the lie.”
    Stephen King

  • #9
    Anton Chekhov
    “Don't tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.”
    Anton Chekhov

  • #10
    Nicholas Sparks
    “In time, the hurt began to fade and it was easier to just let it go. At least I thought it was. But in every boy I met in the next few years, I found myself looking for you, and when the feelings got too strong, I'd write you another letter. But I never sent them for fear of what I might find. By then, you'd gone on with your life and I didn't want to think about you loving someone else. I wanted to remember us like we were that summer. I didn't ever want to lose that.”
    Nicholas Sparks, The Notebook

  • #11
    Ray Bradbury
    “I have never listened to anyone who criticized my taste in space travel, sideshows or gorillas. When this occurs, I pack up my dinosaurs and leave the room.”
    Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

  • #12
    Stephen King
    “The most important things are the hardest to say. They are the things you get ashamed of, because words diminish them -- words shrink things that seemed limitless when they were in your head to no more than living size when they're brought out. But it's more than that, isn't it? The most important things lie too close to wherever your secret heart is buried, like landmarks to a treasure your enemies would love to steal away. And you may make revelations that cost you dearly only to have people look at you in a funny way, not understanding what you've said at all, or why you thought it was so important that you almost cried while you were saying it. That's the worst, I think. When the secret stays locked within not for want of a teller but for want of an understanding ear.”
    Stephen King

  • #13
    J.K. Rowling
    “You should write a book," Ron told Hermione as he cut up his potatoes, "translating mad things girls do so boys can understand them.”
    J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

  • #14
    Neil Gaiman
    “Being a writer is a very peculiar sort of a job: it's always you versus a blank sheet of paper (or a blank screen) and quite often the blank piece of paper wins.”
    Neil Gaiman

  • #15
    Meg Cabot
    “Write the kind of story you would like to read. People will give you all sorts of advice about writing, but if you are not writing something you like, no one else will like it either.”
    Meg Cabot

  • #16
    Neil Gaiman
    “This is how you do it: you sit down at the keyboard and you put one word after another until its done. It's that easy, and that hard.”
    Neil Gaiman

  • #17
    Stephen King
    “A short story is a different thing all together - a short story is like a kiss in the dark from a stranger.”
    Stephen King, Skeleton Crew

  • #18
    Joss Whedon
    “People love a happy ending. So every episode, I will explain once again that I don't like people. And then Mal will shoot someone. Someone we like. And their puppy.”
    Joss Whedon

  • #19
    Ellen DeGeneres
    “You know, it's hard work to write a book. I can't tell you how many times I really get going on an idea, then my quill breaks. Or I spill ink all over my writing tunic.”
    Ellen DeGeneres, The Funny Thing Is...

  • #20
    Virginia Woolf
    “Writing is like sex. First you do it for love, then you do it for your friends, and then you do it for money.”
    Virginia Woolf

  • #21
    Joss Whedon
    “I write to give myself strength. I write to be the characters that I am not. I write to explore all the things I'm afraid of. ”
    Joss Whedon

  • #22
    Ernest Hemingway
    “All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know.”
    Ernest Hemingway

  • #23
    Diane Setterfield
    “People disappear when they die. Their voice, their laughter, the warmth of their breath. Their flesh. Eventually their bones. All living memory of them ceases. This is both dreadful and natural. Yet for some there is an exception to this annihilation. For in the books they write they continue to exist. We can rediscover them. Their humor, their tone of voice, their moods. Through the written word they can anger you or make you happy. They can comfort you. They can perplex you. They can alter you. All this, even though they are dead. Like flies in amber, like corpses frozen in the ice, that which according to the laws of nature should pass away is, by the miracle of ink on paper, preserved. It is a kind of magic.”
    Diane Setterfield, The Thirteenth Tale

  • #24
    Dr. Seuss
    “So the writer who breeds more words than he needs, is making a chore for the reader who reads.”
    Dr. Seuss

  • #25
    John Steinbeck
    “Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen.”
    John Steinbeck

  • #26
    Benjamin Franklin
    “Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing.”
    Benjamin Franklin

  • #27
    Rainer Maria Rilke
    “Find out the reason that commands you to write; see whether it has spread its roots into the very depth of your heart; confess to yourself you would have to die if you were forbidden to write.”
    Rainer Maria Rilke

  • #28
    Eleanor Roosevelt
    “The reason that fiction is more interesting than any other form of literature, to those who really like to study people, is that in fiction the author can really tell the truth without humiliating himself.”
    Eleanor Roosevelt

  • #29
    Stephen King
    “you can, you should, and if you’re brave enough to start, you will.”
    Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

  • #30
    Stephen King
    “There are books full of great writing that don't have very good stories. Read sometimes for the story... don't be like the book-snobs who won't do that. Read sometimes for the words--the language. Don't be like the play-it-safers who won't do that. But when you find a book that has both a good story and good words, treasure that book.”
    Stephen King



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