Daisy > Daisy's Quotes

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  • #1
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    “Men love to wonder, and that is the seed of science.”
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • #2
    Eleanor Roosevelt
    “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”
    Eleanor Roosevelt, This is My Story

  • #3
    Les Brown
    “Life has no limitations, except the ones you make.”
    Les Brown

  • #4
    Lisa Unger
    “The universe conspires to reveal the truth and to make your path easy if you have the courage to follow the signs.”
    Lisa Unger

  • #5
    “Science goes where you imagine it.”
    Judah Folkman

  • #6
    “I don't know if it is my confidence or my techniques.
    I think it is a little of both.”
    Joseph Farrell

  • #7
    “Just remember - when you think all is over, the future remains.”
    Hugh Goddard

  • #8
    Hillary Rodham Clinton
    “when you stumble, keep faith. And when you're knocked down, get right back up and never listen to anyone who says you can't or shouldn't go on.”
    Hillary Rodham Clinton

  • #9
    Albert Einstein
    “If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?”
    Albert Einstein

  • #10
    Albert Einstein
    “The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion that stands at the cradle of true art and true science.”
    Albert Einstein, The World As I See It

  • #11
    Theodore Roszak
    “Nature composes some of her loveliest poems for the microscope and the telescope.”
    Theodore Roszak, Where the Wasteland Ends

  • #12
    Leonardo da Vinci
    “Principles for the Development of a Complete Mind: Study the science of art. Study the art of science. Develop your senses- especially learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.”
    Leonardo da Vinci

  • #13
    Albert Einstein
    “All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. All these aspirations are directed toward ennobling man's life, lifting it from the sphere of mere physical existence and leading the individual towards freedom."

    [Moral Decay (first published 1937)]”
    Albert Einstein, Out of My Later Years: The Scientist, Philosopher, and Man Portrayed Through His Own Words

  • #14
    Albert Einstein
    “I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.”
    Albert Einstein

  • #15
    Albert Einstein
    “One of the strongest motives that lead men to art and science is escape from everyday life with its painful crudity and hopeless dreariness, from the fetters of one's own ever-shifting desires. A finely tempered nature longs to escape from the personal life into the world of objective perception and thought.”
    Albert Einstein

  • #16
    George Orwell
    “To write or even speak English is not a science but an art. There are no reliable words. Whoever writes English is involved in a struggle that never lets up even for a sentence. He is struggling against vagueness, against obscurity, against the lure of the decorative adjective, against the encroachment of Latin and Greek, and, above all, against the worn-out phrases and dead metaphors with which the language is cluttered up.”
    George Orwell

  • #17
    Albert Einstein
    “The only real valuable thing is intuition.”
    Albert Einstein

  • #18
    Arthur Rimbaud
    “A poet makes himself a visionary through a long, boundless, and systematized disorganization of all the senses. All forms of love, of suffering, of madness; he searches himself, he exhausts within himself all poisons, and preserves their quintessences. Unspeakable torment, where he will need the greatest faith, a superhuman strength, where he becomes all men the great invalid, the great criminal, the great accursed--and the Supreme Scientist! For he attains the unknown! Because he has cultivated his soul, already rich, more than anyone! He attains the unknown, and if, demented, he finally loses the understanding of his visions, he will at least have seen them! So what if he is destroyed in his ecstatic flight through things unheard of, unnameable: other horrible workers will come; they will begin at the horizons where the first one has fallen!”
    Arthur Rimbaud

  • #19
    William Shakespeare
    “The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling, doth glance from heaven to Earth, from Earth to heaven; and as imagination bodies forth the forms of things unknown, the poet's pen turns them to shape, and gives to airy nothing a local habitation and a name; such tricks hath strong imagination.”
    William Shakespeare

  • #20
    Christopher Morley
    “The courage of the poet is to keep ajar the door that leads into madness.”
    Christopher Morley

  • #21
    Diane Ackerman
    “There was nothing to do but wait. It is always like this for naturalists, and for poets--the long hours of travel and preparation, and then the longer hours of waiting. All for that one electric, pulse-revving vision when the universe suddenly declares itself.”
    Diane Ackerman, The Moon by Whale Light and Other Adventures Among Bats, Penguins, Crocodilians and Whales

  • #22
    Henry David Thoreau
    “Every poet has trembled on the verge of science.”
    Henry David Thoreau

  • #23
    “A mathematician who is not also something of a poet will never be a complete mathematician.”
    Karl Weierstrass

  • #24
    Émile Zola
    “There are two men inside the artist, the poet and the craftsman. One is born a poet. One becomes a craftsman.”
    Émile Zola

  • #25
    Orhan Pamuk
    “I think a lot about the poems I wasn't able to write...I masturbrated...Solitude is essentially a matter of pride; you bury yourself in your own scent. The issue is the same for all real poets. If you've been happy for too long, you become banal. By the same token, if you've been unhappy for a long time, you lose your poetic power...Happiness and poverty can only coexist for the briefest time. Afterword either happiness coarsens the poet or the poem is so true it destroys his happiness.”
    Orhan Pamuk, Snow

  • #26
    Richard Feynman
    “Study hard what interests you the most in the most undisciplined, irreverent and original manner possible.”
    Richard Feynman

  • #27
    Daniel Alarcón
    “You don’t sound like a scientist, you sound like a poet.”

    Rey smiled, “Can I be both?”

    But you’d rather be a poet.”

    Who wouldn’t?” he said.”
    Daniel Alarcón

  • #28
    E.B. White
    “If the world were merely seductive, that would be easy. If it were merely challenging, that would be no problem. But I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.”
    E.B. White



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