Mathew > Mathew's Quotes

(showing 1-30 of 147)
« previous 1 3 4 5
sort by

  • #1
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
    Seven for the Dwarf-lords in halls of stone,
    Nine for Mortal Men, doomed to die,
    One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
    In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
    One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
    One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them.
    In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

  • #2
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Where did you go to, if I may ask?' said Thorin to Gandalf as they rode along.
    To look ahead,' said he.
    And what brought you back in the nick of time?'
    Looking behind,' said he.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

  • #3
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

  • #4
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Out of doubt, out of dark to the day's rising
    I came singing into the sun, sword unsheathing.
    To hope's end I rode and to heart's breaking:
    Now for wrath, now for ruin and a red nightfall! ”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King
    tags: hope

  • #5
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Good Morning!" said Bilbo, and he meant it. The sun was shining, and the grass was very green. But Gandalf looked at him from under long bushy eyebrows that stuck out further than the brim of his shady hat.

    "What do you mean?" he said. "Do you wish me a good morning, or mean that it is a good morning whether I want it or not; or that you feel good this morning; or that it is a morning to be good on?"

    "All of them at once," said Bilbo. "And a very fine morning for a pipe of tobacco out of doors, into the bargain.

    ...

    "Good morning!" he said at last. "We don't want any adventures here, thank you! You might try over The Hill or across The Water." By this he meant that the conversation was at an end.
    "What a lot of things you do use Good morning for!" said Gandalf. "Now you mean that you want to get rid of me, and that it won't be good till I move off.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

  • #6
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Advice is a dangerous gift, even from the wise to the wise, and all courses may run ill.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

  • #7
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “From the ashes a fire shall be woken,
    A light from the shadows shall spring;
    Renewed shall be blade that was broken,
    The crownless again shall be king.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

  • #8
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness, nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers

  • #9
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “We shouldn't be here at all, if we'd known more about it before we started. But I suppose it's often that way. The brave things in the old tales and songs, Mr. Frodo: adventures, as I used to call them. I used to think that they were things the wonderful folk of the stories went out and looked for, because they wanted them, because they were exciting and life was a bit dull, a kind of a sport, as you might say. But that's not the way of it with the tales that really mattered, or the ones that stay in the mind. Folk seem to have been just landed in them, usually — their paths were laid that way, as you put it. But I expect they had lots of chances, like us, of turning back, only they didn't. And if they had, we shouldn't know, because they'd have been forgotten. We hear about those as just went on — and not all to a good end, mind you; at least not to what folk inside a story and not outside it call a good end. You know, coming home, and finding things all right, though not quite the same — like old Mr Bilbo. But those aren't always the best tales to hear, though they may be the best tales to get landed in! I wonder what sort of a tale we've fallen into?”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers

  • #10
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Well, here at last, dear friends, on the shores of the Sea comes the end of our fellowship in Middle-earth. Go in peace! I will not say: do not weep; for not all tears are an evil.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

  • #11
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “There is more in you of good than you know, child of the kindly West. Some courage and some wisdom, blended in measure. If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

  • #12
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “What a pity that Bilbo did not stab that vile creature, when he had a chance!'
    Pity? It was Pity that stayed his hand. Pity, and Mercy: not to strike without need. And he has been well rewarded, Frodo. Be sure that he took so little hurt from the evil, and escaped in the end, because he began his ownership of the Ring so. With Pity.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

  • #14
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “So comes snow after fire, and even dragons have their endings.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

  • #14
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Still, I wonder if we shall ever be put into songs or tales. We're in one, of course, but I mean: put into words, you know, told by the fireside, or read out of a great big book with red and black letters, years and years afterwards. And people will say: "Let's hear about Frodo and the Ring!" And they will say: "Yes, that's one of my favourite stories. Frodo was very brave, wasn't he, dad?" "Yes, my boy, the famousest of the hobbits, and that's saying a lot."
    'It's saying a lot too much,' said Frodo, and he laughed, a long clear laugh from his heart. Such a sound had not been heard in those places since Sauron came to Middle-earth. To Sam suddenly it seemed as if all the stones were listening and the tall rocks leaning over them. But Frodo did not heed them; he laughed again. 'Why, Sam,' he said, 'to hear you somehow makes me as merry as if the story was already written. But you've left out one of the chief characters: Samwise the stouthearted. "I want to hear more about Sam, dad. Why didn't they put in more of his talk, dad? That's what I like, it makes me laugh. And Frodo wouldn't have got far without Sam, would he, dad?"'
    'Now, Mr. Frodo,' said Sam, 'you shouldn't make fun. I was serious.'
    'So was I,' said Frodo, 'and so I am.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers

  • #15
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Those were happier days, when there was still close friendship at times between folk of different race, even between Dwarves and Elves.'
    It was not the fault of the Dwarves that the friendship waned,' said Gimli.
    I have not heard that it was the fault of the Elves,' said Legolas.
    I have heard both,' said Gandalf[.]”
    J.R.R. Tolkien

  • #16
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Go back?" he thought. "No good at all! Go sideways? Impossible! Go forward? Only thing to do! On we go!" So up he got, and trotted along with his little sword held in front of him and one hand feeling the wall, and his heart all of a patter and a pitter.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

  • #17
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “The way is shut. It was made by those who are Dead, and the Dead keep it, until the time comes. The way is shut.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

  • #18
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “I was talking aloud to myself. A habit of the old: they choose the wisest person present to speak to”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers

  • #19
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Gandalf! I thought you were dead! But then I thought I was dead myself. Is everything sad going to come untrue? What's happened to the world?"
    A great Shadow has departed," said Gandalf, and then he laughed and the sound was like music, or like water in a parched land; and as he listened the thought came to Sam that he had not heard laughter, the pure sound of merriment, for days upon days without count.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

  • #20
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “He [Bilbo] used often to say there was only one Road; that it was like a great river: its springs were at every doorstep, and every path was its tributary. 'It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out of your door,' he used to say. 'You step into the Road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to.' . . .”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

  • #21
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “I am not going to tell you my name, not yet at any rate.' A queer half-knowing, half-humorous look came with a green flicker into his eyes. 'For one thing it would take a long while: my name is growing all the time, and I've lived a very long, long time; so my name is like a story. Real names tell you the story of things they belong to in my language, in the Old Entish as you might say. It is a lovely language, but it takes a very long time saying anything in it, because we do not say anything in it, unless it is worth taking a long time to say, and to listen to.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers

  • #22
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “At the hill’s foot Frodo found Aragorn, standing still and silent as a tree; but in his hand was a small golden bloom of elanor, and a light was in his eyes. He was wrapped in some fair memory: and as Frodo looked at him he knew that he beheld things as they had been in this same place. For the grim years were removed from the face of Aragorn, and he seemed clothed in white, a young lord fall and fair; and he spoke words in the Elvish tongue to one whom Frodo could not see. Arwen vanimelda, namarie! He said, and then he drew a breath, and returning out of his thought he looked at Frodo and smiled.

    `Here is the heart of Elvendom on earth,’ he said, `and here my heart dwells ever, unless there be a light beyond the dark roads that we still must tread, you and I. Come with me!’ And taking Frodo’s hand in his, he left the hill of Cerin Amroth and came there never again as a living man.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

  • #23
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Farewell! O Gandalf! May you ever appear where you are most needed and least expected!”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

  • #24
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “End? No, the journey doesn't end here. Death is just another path, one that we all must take. The grey rain-curtain of this world rolls back, and all turns to silver glass, and then you see it.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien

  • #25
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Now, therefore, I will sleep. I speak no comfort to you, for there is no comfort for such pain within the circles of the world. The uttermost choice is before you: to repent and go to the Havens and bear away into the West the memory of our days together that shall there be evergreen but never more than memory; or else to abide the Doom of Men."

    Nay, dear lord," she said, "that choice is long over. There is now no ship that would bear me hence, and I must indeed abide the Doom of Men, whether I will or I nill: the loss and the silence. But I say to you, King of the Numenoreans, not till now have I understood the tale of your people and their fall. As wicked fools I scorned them, but I pity them at last. For if this is indeed, as the Eldar say, the gift of the One to Men, it is bitter to receive."

    So it seems," he said. "But let us not be overthrown at the final test, who of old renounced the Shadow and the Ring. In sorrow we must go, but not in despair. Behold! we are not bound for ever to the circles of the world, and beyond them is more than memory.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    tags: lotr

  • #26
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tor high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

  • #27
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Surely you don’t disbelieve the prophecies, because you had a hand in bringing them about yourself? You don’t really suppose, do you, that all your adventures and escapes were managed by mere luck, just for your sole benefit? You are a very fine person, Mr. Baggins, and I am very fond of you; but you are only quite a little fellow in a wide world after all!”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

  • #28
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Few other griefs amid the ill chances of this world have more bitterness and shame for a man's heart than to behold the love of a lady so fair and brave that cannot be returned.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

  • #29
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Grave and thoughtful was her glance, as she looked on the king with cool pity in her eyes. Very fair was her face, and her long hair was like a river of gold. Slender and tall she was in her white robe girt with silver; but strong she seemed and stern as steel, a daughter of kings.
    Thus Aragorn for the first time in the full light of day beheld Eowyn, Lady of Rohan, and thought her fair; fair and cold, like a morning of pale spring that is not yet come to womanhood. And she now was suddenly aware of him: tall heir of kings, wise with many winters, grey cloaked, hiding a power that yet she felt. For a moment still as stone she stood, then turning swiftly she was gone.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien

  • #30
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Bilbo’s Last Song

    Day is ended, dim my eyes,
    But journey long before me lies.
    Farewell, friends! I hear the call.
    The ship's beside the stony wall.
    Foam is white and waves are grey;
    Beyond the sunset leads my way.
    Foam is salt, the wind is free;
    I hear the rising of the Sea.

    Farewell, friends! The sails are set,
    The wind is east, the moorings fret.
    Shadows long before me lie,
    Beneath the ever-bending sky,
    But islands lie behind the Sun
    That I shall raise ere all is done;
    Lands there are to west of West,
    Where night is quiet and sleep is rest.

    Guided by the Lonely Star,
    Beyond the utmost harbour-bar,
    I’ll find the heavens fair and free,
    And beaches of the Starlit Sea.
    Ship, my ship! I seek the West,
    And fields and mountains ever blest.
    Farewell to Middle-earth at last.
    I see the Star above my mast!”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, Bilbo's Last Song



Rss
« previous 1 3 4 5
All Quotes