Miranda > Miranda's Quotes

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  • #1
    Dorothy Parker
    “I don't know," she said. "We used to squabble a lot when we were going together and then engaged and everything, but I thought everything would be so different as soon as you were married. And now I feel so sort of strange and everything. I feel so sort of alone.”
    Dorothy Parker, Here We Are


  • #2
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “I'm not sentimental--I'm as romantic as you are. The idea, you know,
    is that the sentimental person thinks things will last--the romantic
    person has a desperate confidence that they won't.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise


  • #3
    Alan Moore
    “I'm 65 years old. Everyday the future looks a little bit darker. But the past, even the grimy parts of it, well, it just keeps on getting brighter all the time.”
    Alan Moore, Watchmen


  • #4
    Muriel Barbery
    “When tea becomes ritual, it takes its place at the heart of our ability to see greatness in small things. Where is beauty to be found? In great things that, like everything else, are doomed to die, or in small things that aspire to nothing, yet know how to set a jewel of infinity in a single moment?”
    Muriel Barbery, The Elegance of the Hedgehog


  • #5
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “What'll we do with ourselves this afternoon?” cried Daisy, “and the day after that, and the next thirty years?”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby


  • #6
    Nicole Krauss
    “2. WHAT I AM NOT

    My brother and I used to play a game. I'd point to a chair. "THIS IS NOT A CHAIR," I'd say. Bird would point to the table. "THIS IS NOT A TABLE." "THIS IS NOT A WALL," I'd say. "THAT IS NOT A CEILING." We'd go on like that. "IT IS NOT RAINING OUT." "MY SHOE IS NOT UNTIED!" Bird would yell. I'd point to my elbow. "THIS IS NOT A SCRAPE." Bird would lift his knee. "THIS IS ALSO NOT A SCRAPE!" "THAT IS NOT A KETTLE!" "NOT A CUP!" "NOT A SPOON!" "NOT DIRTY DISHES!" We denied whole rooms, years, weathers. Once, at the peak of our shouting, Bird took a deep breath. At the top of his lungs, he shrieked: "I! HAVE NOT! BEEN! UNHAPPY! MY WHOLE! LIFE!" "But you're only seven," I said.”
    Nicole Krauss


  • #7
    Janet Burroway
    “Most writing is done between the mind and the hand, not between the hand and the page.”
    Janet Burroway, Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft


  • #8
    John Steinbeck
    “I wonder how many people I've looked at all my life and never seen.”
    John Steinbeck, The Winter of Our Discontent


  • #9
    Douglas Adams
    “For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much—the wheel, New York, wars and so on—whilst all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man—for precisely the same reasons.”
    Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy


  • #10
    Nicole Krauss
    “ONE THING I AM NEVER GOING TO DO WHEN I GROW UP
    Is fall in love, drop out of college, learn to subsist on water and air, have a species named after me, and ruin my life.”
    Nicole Krauss, The History of Love


  • #11
    Nicole Krauss
    “When I got older I decided I wanted to be a real writer. I tried to write about real things. I wanted to describe the world, because to live in an undescribed world was too lonely.”
    Nicole Krauss, The History of Love


  • #12
    William Faulkner
    “In writing, you must kill all your darlings.”
    William Faulkner


  • #13
    Dave Gibbons
    “The lady who works in the grocery store at the corner of my block is called Denise, and she's one of America's great unpublished novelists. Over the years she's written forty-two romantic novels, none of which have ever reached the bookstores. I, however, have been fortunate enough to hear the plots of the last twenty-seven of these recounted in installments by the authoress herself every time I drop by the store for a jar of coffee or can of beans, and my respect for Denise's literary prowess knows no bounds. So, naturally enough, when I found myself faced with the daunting task of actually starting the book you now hold in your hands, it was Denise I turned to for advice.”
    Dave Gibbons, Watchmen


  • #14
    Samuel Johnson
    “Read over your compositions, and wherever you meet with a passage which you think is particularly fine, strike it out.”
    Samuel Johnson, The Life of Samuel Johnson LL.D. Vol 2


  • #15
    Samuel Johnson
    “A man ought to read just as inclination leads him; for what he reads as a task will do him little good.”
    Samuel Johnson, The Life of Samuel Johnson, Vol 2


  • #16
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “Good manners are an admission that everybody is so tender that they have to be handled with gloves. Now, human respect—you don't call a man a coward or a liar lightly, but if you spend your life sparing people's feelings and feeding their vanity, you get so you can't distinguish what should be respected in them.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, Tender Is the Night


  • #17
    A.J. Jacobs
    “I'm still agnostic. But in the words of Elton Richards, I'm now a reverant agnostic. Which isn't an oxymoron, I swear. I now believe that whether or not there's a God, there is such a thing as sacredness. Life is sacred. The Sabbath can be a sacred day. Prayer can be a sacred ritual. There is something transcendent, beyond the everyday. It's possible that humans created this sacredness ourselves, but that doesn't take away from its power or importance.”
    A.J. Jacobs, The Year of Living Biblically: One Man's Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible


  • #18
    A.J. Jacobs
    “. . . my obsession with gratefulness. I can't stop. Just now, I press the elevator button and am thankful that it arrives quickly. I get onto the elevator and am thankful that the elevator cable didn't snap and plummet me to the basement. I go to the fifth floor and am thankful that I didn't have to stop on the second or third or fourth floor. I get out and am thankful that Julie left the door unlocked so I don't have to rummage for my King Kong key ring. I walk in, and am thnkful that Jasper is home and healthy and stuffing his face with pineapple wedges. And on and on. I'm actually muttering to myself, 'Thank you. . .thank you. . . thank you.' It's an odd way to live. But also kind of great and powerful. I've never before been so aware of the thousands of little good things, the thousands of things that go right every day.”
    A.J. Jacobs, The Year of Living Biblically: One Man's Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible




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