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  • #1
    J.D. Salinger
    “I used to think she was quite intelligent , in my stupidity. The reason I did was because she knew quite a lot about the theater and plays and literature and all that stuff. If somebody knows quite a lot about all those things, it takes you quite a while to find out whether they're really stupid or not.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #2
    J.D. Salinger
    “I'm a kind of paranoiac in reverse. I suspect people of plotting to make me happy.”
    J.D. Salinger, Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters & Seymour: An Introduction

  • #3
    J.D. Salinger
    “People always clap for the wrong reasons.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #4
    J.D. Salinger
    “It was that kind of a crazy afternoon, terrifically cold, and no sun out or anything, and you felt like you were disappearing every time you crossed a road.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #5
    J.D. Salinger
    “An artist's only concern is to shoot for some kind of perfection, and on his own terms, not anyone else's.”
    J.D. Salinger, Franny and Zooey
    tags: art

  • #6
    J.D. Salinger
    “If you do something too good, then, after a while, if you don't watch it, you start showing off. And then you're not as good any more.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #7
    J.D. Salinger
    “People never notice anything.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #8
    J.D. Salinger
    “Against my better judgment I feel certain that somewhere very near here—the first house down the road, maybe—there's a good poet dying, but also somewhere very near here somebody's having a hilarious pint of pus taken from her lovely young body, and I can't be running back and forth forever between grief and high delight.”
    J.D. Salinger, Franny and Zooey

  • #9
    J.D. Salinger
    “The best thing, though, in that museum was that everything always stayed right where it was. Nobody'd move. You could go there a hundred thousand times, and that Eskimo would still be just finished catching those two fish, the birds would still be on their way south, the deers would still be drinking out of that water hole, with their pretty antlers and they're pretty, skinny legs, and that squaw with the naked bosom would still be weaving that same blanket. Nobody's be different. The only thing that would be different would be you. Not that you'd be so much older or anything. It wouldn't be that, exactly. You'd just be different, that's all. You'd have an overcoat this time. Or the kid that was your partner in line the last time had got scarlet fever and you'd have a new partner. Or you'd have a substitute taking the class, instead of Miss Aigletinger. Or you'd heard your mother and father having a terrific fight in the bathroom. Or you'd just passed by one of those puddles in the street with gasoline rainbows in them. I mean you'd be different in some way—I can't explain what I mean. And even if I could, I'm not sure I'd feel like it.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #10
    J.D. Salinger
    “Franny has the measles, for one thing. Incidentally, did you hear her last week? She went on at beautiful length about how she used to fly all around the apartment when she was four and no one was home. The new announcer is worse than Grant - if possible, even worse than Sullivan in the old days. He said she surely dreamt that she was able to fly. The baby stood her ground like an angel. She said she knew she was able to fly because when she came down she always had dust on her fingers from touching the light bulbs.”
    J.D. Salinger, Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction

  • #11
    J.D. Salinger
    “I don't really deeply feel that anyone needs an airtight reason for quoting from the works of the writers he loves, but it's always nice, I'll grant you, if he has one.”
    J.D. Salinger, Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters & Seymour: An Introduction

  • #12
    J.D. Salinger
    “Or you'd just passed by one of those puddles in the street with gasoline rainbows in them. I mean you'd be different in some way—I can't explain what I mean. And even if I could, I'm not sure I'd feel like it.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #13
    J.D. Salinger
    “Keep me up till five because all your stars are out, and for no other reason…Oh dare to do it Buddy! Trust your heart. You’re a deserving craftsman. It would never betray you. Good night. I’m feeling very much over-excited now, and a little dramatic, but I think I’d give almost anything on earth to see you writing a something, an anything, a poem, a tree, that was really and truly after your own heart.”
    J.D. Salinger, Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters & Seymour: An Introduction

  • #14
    J.D. Salinger
    “Don't you think I have sense enough to worry about my motives for saying the prayer? That's exactly what's bothering me so. Just because I'm choosy about what I want - in this case, enlightenment or peace, instead or money or prestige or game or any of those things, doesn't mean I'm not as egotistical and self-seeking as everybody else. If anything, I'm more so!”
    J.D. Salinger, Franny and Zooey

  • #15
    J.D. Salinger
    “But guilt is guilt. It doesn't go away. It can't be nullified. It can't even be fully understood, I'm certain - it's roots run too deep into private and long-standing karma. About the only thing that saves my neck when I get to feeling this way is that guilt is an imperfect form of knowledge. Just because it isn't perfect doesn't mean that it can't be used. The hard thing to do is to put it to practical use, before it gets around to paralyzing you.”
    J.D. Salinger, Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters & Seymour: An Introduction

  • #16
    J.D. Salinger
    “If I were God, I certainly wouldn't want people to love me sentimentally. It's too unreliable.”
    J.D. Salinger, Nine Stories

  • #17
    J.D. Salinger
    “They love their reasons for loving us almost as much as they love us, and most of the time more. It's not so good, that way.”
    J.D. Salinger, Nine Stories
    tags: teddy

  • #18
    J.D. Salinger
    “However contradictory the coroner's report — whether he pronounces Consumption or Loneliness or Suicide to be the cause of death — isn't it plain how the true artist-seer actually dies? I say that the true artist-seer, the heavenly fool who can and does produce beauty, is mainly dazzled to death by his own scruples, the blinding shapes and colors of his own sacred human conscience.”
    J.D. Salinger, Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters & Seymour: An Introduction

  • #19
    J.D. Salinger
    “If you're going to say the Jesus Prayer, at least say it to Jesus, and not to St. Francis and Seymour and Heidi's grandfather all wrapped up in one.”
    J.D. Salinger, Franny and Zooey

  • #20
    J.D. Salinger
    “I don't hate too many guys. What I may do, I may hate them for a little while, like this guy Stradlater I knew at Pencey, and this other boy, Robert Ackley. I hate them once in a while—I admit it—but it doesn't last too long, is what I mean. After a while, if I didn't see them, if they didn't come in the room, or if I didn't see them in the dining room for a couple of meals, I sort of missed them. I mean I sort of missed them.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #21
    J.D. Salinger
    “John Keats / John Keats / John / Please put your scarf on.”
    J.D. Salinger, Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters & Seymour: An Introduction

  • #22
    J.D. Salinger
    “I like it when somebody gets excited about something. It's nice.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #23
    Daphne du Maurier
    “I wish I was a woman of about thirty-six dressed in black satin with a string of pearls.”
    Daphne du Maurier, Rebecca

  • #24
    Daphne du Maurier
    “If only there could be an invention that bottled up a memory, like scent. And it never faded, and it never got stale. And then, when one wanted it, the bottle could be uncorked, and it would be like living the moment all over again.”
    Daphne du Maurier, Rebecca

  • #25
    Sarah Waters
    “There was a prisoner, I said, in the first cell of the second passage. A fair-haired girl, quite young, quite handsome. What did Miss Craven know of her? The matron's face had grown sour when talking of Cook. Now it grew sour again. 'Selina Dawes,' she said. 'A queer one. Keeps her eyes and her mind to herself--that's all I know. I've heard her called the easiest prisoner in the gaol. They say she has never given an hour's trouble since she was brought here. Deep, I call her.' Deep? 'As the ocean.”
    Sarah Waters, Affinity
    tags: gothic

  • #26
    Sarah Waters
    “Did she remember, how we laughed and blushed? 'Pa used to say your face was like the red heart on a playing card--mine, he said, was like the diamond. Do you remember, Helen, how Pa said that?”
    Sarah Waters, Affinity

  • #27
    Sarah Waters
    “I would rather visit Selina, than go to Garden Court to visit Helen--for Helen is as full of wedding talk as any of them, but Selina they have so removed from ordinary rules and habits, she might be living, cold and graceful, on the surface of the moon.”
    Sarah Waters, Affinity

  • #28
    Patrick McCabe
    “I wanted to stop talking about the whole thing. I wanted to talk about the hide and the old days and hacking at the ice and whose turn it was to toss the marble and all that, that was what I wanted to talk about. They were the best days, you could see through them days, as clear as polished glass. But Joe didn't want to.”
    Patrick McCabe, The Butcher Boy

  • #29
    Patrick McCabe
    “All of a sudden I looked at him with his rosy cheeks and the two silver snots at his nose and what did I want to do I wanted to kiss him. Not the way Tiddly did it any of that but just because all of a sudden everything seemed so good. I said to myself: Just being here is so good I could stand here for ever.”
    Patrick McCabe, The Butcher Boy

  • #30
    Patrick McCabe
    “Mary had the same face as ma used to have sitting staring into the ashes it was funny that face it slowly grew over the other one until one day you looked and the person you knew was gone. And instead there was a half-ghost sitting there who had only one thing to say: All the beautiful things of this world are lies. They count for nothing in the end.”
    Patrick McCabe, The Butcher Boy



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