Matthew > Matthew's Quotes

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  • #1
    Aristophanes
    “Love is merely the name for the desire and pursuit of the whole.”
    Aristophanes

  • #2
    Friedrich Nietzsche
    “It is not a lack of love, but a lack of friendship that makes unhappy marriages.”
    Friedrich Nietzsche

  • #3
    Karl Popper
    “The so-called paradox of freedom is the argument that freedom in the sense of absence of any constraining control must lead to very great restraint, since it makes the bully free to enslave the meek. The idea is, in a slightly different form, and with very different tendency, clearly expressed in Plato.

    Less well known is the paradox of tolerance: Unlimited tolerance must lead to the disappearance of tolerance. If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them. — In this formulation, I do not imply, for instance, that we should always suppress the utterance of intolerant philosophies; as long as we can counter them by rational argument and keep them in check by public opinion, suppression would certainly be unwise. But we should claim the right to suppress them if necessary even by force; for it may easily turn out that they are not prepared to meet us on the level of rational argument, but begin by denouncing all argument; they may forbid their followers to listen to rational argument, because it is deceptive, and teach them to answer arguments by the use of their fists or pistols. We should therefore claim, in the name of tolerance, the right not to tolerate the intolerant. We should claim that any movement preaching intolerance places itself outside the law, and we should consider incitement to intolerance and persecution as criminal, in the same way as we should consider incitement to murder, or to kidnapping, or to the revival of the slave trade, as criminal.”
    Karl Popper, The Open Society and Its Enemies

  • #5
    Karl Popper
    “Science may be described as the art of systematic oversimplification.”
    Karl Popper

  • #5
    Haruki Murakami
    “Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional.”
    Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running

  • #6
    Franz Kafka
    “All language is but a poor translation.”
    Franz Kafka

  • #7
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    “Pain and suffering are always inevitable for a large intelligence and a deep heart. The really great men must, I think, have great sadness on earth.”
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

  • #8
    Haruki Murakami
    “Memories warm you up from the inside. But they also tear you apart.”
    Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

  • #9
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    “People speak sometimes about the "bestial" cruelty of man, but that is terribly unjust and offensive to beasts, no animal could ever be so cruel as a man, so artfully, so artistically cruel.”
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky

  • #10
    John Rawls
    “Many of our most serious conflicts are conflicts within ourselves. Those who suppose their judgements are always consistent are unreflective or dogmatic.”
    John Rawls, Justice as Fairness: A Restatement

  • #11
    John Milton
    “The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven..”
    John Milton, Paradise Lost

  • #12
    Lou Andreas-Salomé
    “Poetry is something in-between the dream and its interpretation.”
    Lou Andreas-Salomé

  • #13
    Judith Butler
    “Let's face it. We're undone by each other. And if we're not, we're missing something. If this seems so clearly the case with grief, it is only because it was already the case with desire. One does not always stay intact. It may be that one wants to, or does, but it may also be that despite one's best efforts, one is undone, in the face of the other, by the touch, by the scent, by the feel, by the prospect of the touch, by the memory of the feel. And so when we speak about my sexuality or my gender, as we do (and as we must), we mean something complicated by it. Neither of these is precisely a possession, but both are to be understood as modes of being dispossessed, ways of being for another, or, indeed, by virtue of another.”
    Judith Butler, Undoing Gender

  • #14
    Judith Butler
    “...gender is a kind of imitation for which there is no original; in fact, it is a kind of imitation that produces the very notion of the original as an effect and consequence of the imitation itself...what they imitate is a phantasmic ideal of heterosexual identity...gay identities work neither to copy nor emulate heterosexuality, but rather, to expose heterosexuality as an incessant and panicked imitation of its own naturalized idealization. That heterosexuality is always in the act of elaborating itself is evidence that it is perpetually at risk, that it, that it 'knows' it's own possibility of becoming undone”
    Judith Butler

  • #15
    Aristotle
    “It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.”
    Aristotle, Metaphysics

  • #16
    Haruki Murakami
    “If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.”
    Haruki Murakami, Norwegian Wood

  • #17
    Franz Kafka
    “A First Sign of the Beginning of Understanding is the Wish to Die.”
    Franz Kafka

  • #18
    Douglas Adams
    “I love deadlines. I love the whooshing noise they make as they go by.”
    Douglas Adams, The Salmon of Doubt

  • #19
    Louis Althusser
    “One of the goals of philosophy is wage theoretical battle. That is why we can say that every thesis is always, by its very nature, an antithesis. A thesis is only ever put forward in opposition to another thesis, or in defence of a new one.”
    Louis Althusser, Philosophy of the Encounter: Later Writings, 1978-87

  • #20
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Mother Night

  • #21
    Paulo Freire
    “Washing one's hands of the conflict between the powerful and the powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral. ”
    Paulo Freire

  • #22
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “1492. As children we were taught to memorize this year with pride and joy as the year people began living full and imaginative lives on the continent of North America. Actually, people had been living full and imaginative lives on the continent of North America for hundreds of years before that. 1492 was simply the year sea pirates began to rob, cheat, and kill them.”
    Kurt Vonnegut

  • #23
    William Gibson
    “The future is already here – it's just not evenly distributed.

    The Economist, December 4, 2003
    William Gibson

  • #24
    Warsan Shire
    “My alone feels so good, I'll only have you if you're sweeter than my solitude.”
    Warsan Shire

  • #25
    Willard Van Orman Quine
    “A curious thing about the ontological problem is its simplicity. It can be put into three Anglo-Saxon monosyllables: 'What is there?' It can be answered, moreover, in a word--'Everything'--and everyone will accept this answer as true.”
    Willard Van Orman Quine

  • #26
    Bertolt Brecht
    “The worst illiterate is the political illiterate, he doesn’t hear, doesn’t speak, nor participates in the political events. He doesn’t know the cost of life, the price of the bean, of the fish, of the flour, of the rent, of the shoes and of the medicine, all depends on political decisions. The political illiterate is so stupid that he is proud and swells his chest saying that he hates politics. The imbecile doesn’t know that, from his political ignorance is born the prostitute, the abandoned child, and the worst thieves of all, the bad politician, corrupted and flunky of the national and multinational companies.”
    Bertolt Brecht

  • #27
    Alain Badiou
    “Love without risk is an impossibility, like war without death.”
    Alain Badiou, In Praise of Love

  • #28
    James Baldwin
    “You think your pain and your heartbreak are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you read. It was books that taught me that the things that tormented me most were the very things that connected me with all the people who were alive, or who had ever been alive.”
    James Baldwin

  • #29
    Walt Whitman
    “I do not ask the wounded person how he feels, I myself become the wounded person.”
    Walt Whitman, Song of Myself

  • #30
    Simone Weil
    “All sins are attempts to fill voids.”
    Simone Weil



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