Henry David Thoreau

“I delight to come to my bearings,—not walk in procession with pomp and parade, in a conspicuous place, but to walk even with the Builder of the universe, if I may,—not to live in this restless, nervous, bustling, trivial Nineteenth Century, but stand or sit thoughtfully while it goes by. What are men celebrating? They are all on a committee of arrangements, and hourly expect a speech from somebody. God is only the president of the day, and Webster is his orator. I love to weigh, to settle, to gravitate toward that which most strongly and rightfully attracts me;—not hang by the beam of the scale and try to weigh less,—not suppose a case, but take the case that is”


Henry David Thoreau, Walden
Read more quotes from Henry David Thoreau


Share this quote:
Twitter icon

Friends Who Liked This Quote


To see what your friends thought of this quote, please sign up!

All Quotes
My Quotes
Add A Quote

This Quote Is From

Walden Walden by Henry David Thoreau
118,852 ratings, average rating, 3,551 reviews
Open Preview


Browse By Tag

More...