Poll

Do you work as a librarian for a living?

No
 
  276306 votes, 92.5%

Yes
 
  13970 votes, 4.7%

I am in library science school or training to become a librarian.
 
  6468 votes, 2.2%

I am a retired librarian.
 
  1888 votes, 0.6%


Poll added by: Patrick



Comments (showing 301-350 of 426) (426 new)


message 301: by Brenda (new)

Brenda Lochinger I am not a librarian but I do help 3 times a week at my daughter's junior high library and my son's elementary library. Love those ladies. They work so hard and need good parent volunteers!


message 302: by Phyllis (new)

Phyllis Bothwell to Brenda: God bless you! Librarians in schools - especially elementary schools - DO need helpful parents. They can also become good friends. Though I've been retired for twenty years I still regularly see at least six or eight of those parents and treasure our friendships. Phyllis


message 303: by Jenna (new)

Jenna Cantino I work at 2 libraries even though I have an M.Ed. Deciding to work in a library instead of within my academic field was the best decision of my life. I'm not making a ton of money but I rarely dread going to work. :)


message 304: by Katalili (new)

Katalili I share that feeling. I go to work with a smile, work with a smile and get home after a day at work, still smiling.


message 305: by Palle (new)

Palle Dixon Palle wrote: "No But I actually kind of want to work at a library
My local librarians Joan and Mary (the people I see most~ ) Know my name I go there so often. ;w;"



message 306: by Deborah (new)

Deborah I worked at a library as an assistant...loved it


message 307: by Charles (new)

Charles On a recent radio interview I heard the subject say in passing "And I really loved my job!" My unthinking response was -- that's weird. My wife asked did I not expect people to like their jobs? and I had to admit, no. Well, she said, what about all those librarians on your Goodreads list? I suppose we're self-selecting here -- librarians who hated the work are not interested. But the question does arise: What is there to (not) like? Is it the people? Customers, colleagues? Some library specialties are famously not people jobs, and the profession has a marked tolerance for social misfits. Who here is not a reference, public, or school librarian? I used to like the meditative aspect of looking up hundreds of order cards in BIP, when there were such things -- are you one of those fortunate people who puts books back on the shelves at 2am? Probably you aren't an administrator, despised and harried by all. And among you on the front lines, what is it about snotty squalling kids, people who only want to know where the bathroom is, people who think you're a loser, porn addicts, and that guy who is crawling around on the floor trying to run his nose in an unbroken path along every piece of woodwork in the building -- don't matter? I would bet that most of you, when you tell someone what you do and get back the stock remarks "You must really like books" or "I remember as a child ... [fill in the blank]" do not feel the inadequacy of this response. Perhaps it's true that librarianship is a warm fuzzy job for people who like to read. Librarianship is, I believe, statistically high in job satisfaction (somebody Google that ... ) Are we all doe-eyed idealists? Are there no curmudgeons who sneer at all this goo and treacle? Why are you all so damned happy? It's not fair on the rest of the world.


message 308: by Brenda (new)

Brenda Lochinger Phyllis wrote: "to Brenda: God bless you! Librarians in schools - especially elementary schools - DO need helpful parents. They can also become good friends. Though I've been retired for twenty years I still re..."

Love the librarians I work with. They not only do tons of work with the kids but help out the teachers in so many ways. I so enjoy being there for them and listening to the funny things the elementary kids have to say when they come in.


message 309: by [deleted user] (new)

I don't believe I could handle such a job. I am more of an adventurous type. I need to be able to wander aimlessly.


message 310: by Charles (new)

Charles Julia wrote: "I don't believe I could handle such a job. I am more of an adventurous type. I need to be able to wander aimlessly."

Not sure what 'wander aimlessly' means. I was under supervision only the first year of my career and never desk bound. I was an academic and had the freedom any professor would have. Most professionals would experience so degree of that.


message 311: by [deleted user] (new)

Charles wrote: "Julia wrote: "I don't believe I could handle such a job. I am more of an adventurous type. I need to be able to wander aimlessly."

Not sure what 'wander aimlessly' means. I was under supervision o..."


I mean, I can't be stuck in a building filled with books. I need to see the world. Then again, I am young and full of energy. Maybe someday I will be okay with being a librarian.


message 312: by Bitsy (new)

Bitsy Griffin I've had people outside of library science tell me I was in a dying field, but never anyone within the field. Just because it's changing doesn't mean its dying.


message 313: by David (new)

David L Librarian for 12 years, doing my doctorate in Historical Studies at Drew...Went to Pratt for my MLS, BA is in History Wm Paterson University of NJ

Been an avid reader all my life with interests in
American History
American Labor History
Ship building
Naval History

Submarine Histories
History of Science and Technology

Mysteries
Suspense
Techno thrillers
Legal thrillers

Adventure
Clive Cussler Dirk Pitt Novels, Issac Bell Novels

Classics
Tom Sawyer
Huck Finn
James Joyce
W. Somerset Maughm


message 314: by Corelle (new)

Corelle I work in a library as a library assistant


message 315: by Susan (new)

Susan Hudnall "dying field?" - I am a middle grades media specialist and I have learned more technology skills in this job in the past 5 years than I could ever begin to tell you. No, librarian/media specialist in the schools is definitely NOT a dying field!


message 316: by Brandee (new)

Brandee A. I'm not technically a Librarian the title I currently hold is Library Assistant :-)


Ashley (For the Love of the Page) I work as a work-study student in the library... Does that count? :]


message 318: by Maggie (new)

Maggie Library paige, I don't really do much except put the books back. It's quiet life.


message 319: by Haroon (new)

Haroon hi. how are u? I hope u r fine and u have a good I diea I respect u

Haroon from Afghanistan


message 320: by Joan (new)

Joan DeArtemis I'm doing work-study now, too, in Circulations. I like it a lot.


message 321: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass My "yes" should be qualified. I'm not a librarian with a library degree, but I work at the library. Can't begin to say a "make my living at the library" because I work very part time and have to be glad I don't have to live on my earnings.


message 322: by Sunny (new)

Sunny Shore I'm a HS librarian. I have been a librarian for 35 years, first typing my own catalog cards and working in the public library to getting my teacher certification in 1990, when I was pregnant with my third son. I have worked in primary, middle school and now HS. I always did a lot of teaching of research skills. About two years ago, due to budget cuts - I lost my library clerk. It has made my job horrendous with 1300 students in the building. I cannot teach anymore. The kids love to read and love the big series - Hunger Games, etc. as well as a lot of urban lit and it is still rewarding, but my hands are tied with budget cuts. I lost my computer in my office and now my private printer. I'm almost at retirement, so I don't want to make a change. I have always loved this field, the environments of library through the world of literature and the computer age.


message 323: by Pandora (new)

Pandora I also volunteered at a small academical Library, after completing my Diploma of Library Practices. Have also worked in a different academical Library and two different public Libraries....loved it, but still looking for that permanent one!


message 324: by Julie (last edited Mar 02, 2012 01:16PM) (new)

Julie I have a PhD in biology and would kind of like to work as a science librarian. It seems like it could be a good alternative to becoming a tenured professor.


message 325: by Brandee (new)

Brandee A. I wish the question was instead, Do you work at a library? ;-) .... then i could say yes and tell everyone how much I enjoy my job


message 326: by Chana (last edited Mar 13, 2012 06:54PM) (new)

Chana There seems to be no category for me! I have an MLIS and worked for years as a reference librarian in academia. Today I'm a freelance writer and researcher. Having been a librarian is still a crucial part of my professional identity.


message 327: by Beth (new)

Beth Brian wrote: "Academic Libraries are not under the same budget threats and challenges from conservative activists that public libraries are. I don't see academic libraries fading away, but that is still a speci..."

I also volunteer in my small public library...it was going to be closed, by the *liberal* county commissioners...the conservative ones wanted their budget left alone, but the others (including one on the library board) voted to close two branches...along with our senior center. Careful where you sling stones and point fingers. Assumptions can get you in trouble.

And, for the record, I've never been trapped in any field...and I've worked in many...if you're unhappy, change fields. I'll happily work for free to keep the library open...for more reasons than books.


message 328: by Mays (new)

Mays Jasim Diabolical Daemonic wrote: "I'm not a librarian, but I worked as an assistant one for the summer :P"
Same as me


message 329: by Kerrikoala (new)

Kerrikoala Technically I'm not a librarian, but seeing as how I've worked in a library for 14.5 years, I guess you could call me one. Unofficially.


message 330: by Cecilia (new)

Cecilia Cecilia's gentle rant...:>

Libraries have always been under budget restraints & cuts and sometimes you have to speak up & fight the system just to get by. Those appreciating the worth of their library need to creatively take the lead in making it the heart, center & hub of the community...not always an easy task but, I think, a necessary one...and one that can be shared by everyone not just the library staff & library board.

I live in a small town of about 8,000+ residents. Ten yrs. ago, the population voted for a building expansion that quadrupled our space allowing for more materials, computers for patron use, two smaller meeting rooms and a large community room which was very much needed in this town. Unfortunately, I doubt this would pass if put to a vote today given the current economy.

The point of all this blathering being...use your library for all it's worth and more! Get your money's worth out of your library. Hey, your taxes are paying my salary...well, the janitor's, too. So, if you've never darkened the doors of your library, go, see if you are missing out. Suggest ideas for any kind of programming (belly dancing's been done...not here...but it's been done...we have had a "ghost hunter" present a program and answer questions, that was cool!); suggest displays...tell someone at the library if you have a hobby or collection, something you could share with others by display if you're shy or show if you're not on how to do a craft, cook food, change a tire, etc.; suggest books, ebooks, audio books...any kind of books or other materials for the library to buy. The point is...it is YOUR library.

I've read several comments here and agree that libraries are going to have to change & adapt to whatever comes next...we've always done this to stay relevant & hopefully enrich people's lives and always will. I'm so glad to see that people here, both library workers and library patrons (I hope...:), know this and agree. I think I saw a comment by 'Christine' early on and succinctly put (unlike me...:) that…[libraries are]…"Changing - not dying". I think that says it all.

I'm proud (and lucky!) to be a librarian! I won't ever get rich in this business but I get to meet lots of interesting people & authors and when that new carton of books, DVD's, etc. arrives it sure pays off in other ways.

If you’ve made it this far, thanks for putting up with me and please, be gentle…:> Cheers!

--Cecilia


message 331: by Vina (new)

Vina Kent Ok so Im not a librarian....i found this thread kinda curious however as I LOVE the library, of course... Anyone who knows me or has read my profile knows that... But Ive always wanted to work in a library. No, really! As a kid i thought it would be fun to be around books all day. I hope to one day own my very own library :D


message 332: by Ric (new)

Ric Johnson Brian wrote: "Lucky??? trapped in a dying field?"

You do not know the field if you think it is dying.
It is changing. I am so lucky!!!


message 333: by Charles (new)

Charles Isabella wrote: "Selena wrote: "Brian wrote: "Lucky??? trapped in a dying field?"

It won't be a dying field. There's more to "library sciences" than sitting behind a desk all day. Part of it's helping people find ..."


I'm not so sure about the passing of the physical library. The early Borders kerfluffel seemed to presage this, but all it revealed was that libraries as places were an important institution for holding the community together. As for physical books, I started an almost-all digital research library and it's still digital. Big success. The mother of that library has over a hundred thousand e-books and nobody's complaining. But those are comprehensive libraries. Of course, people complain to public libraries when they don't have the book, but again, the function of the library as a social institution means that all those people who want booky books need to be taken into account. The research library wants to have a comprehensive collection. The public library wants to have a comprehensive clientele. Real physical people. I think books in libraries are going to be tough to dislodge.


message 334: by Gigi (new)

Gigi Jordan I enjoyed 22 years of working as a school librarian. I had the opportunity to introduce the works of authors and illustrators who have made a significant impact on the world of children's literature. I wanted my children (students) to read good/great literature. In doing so, I learned more and more about wonderful "old" authors and some "new" authors. I loved teaching and being surrounded by books.


message 335: by Charles (new)

Charles Gigi wrote: "I enjoyed 22 years of working as a school librarian. I had the opportunity to introduce the works of authors and illustrators who have made a significant impact on the world of children's literatu..."

This raises an issue that probably goes somewhere else but I don't know where. Last night I saw a story on the PBS news [sorry, no link] about new reading programs which target the problem as in part the preponderance of "fiction". Well, if the kids were reading stories and poetry as serious and difficult as the astronomy and philosophy books I saw being used, and were encouraged to answer questions of a comparable subtlety, Curious George is indeed not going to be good enough. No, such stuff is not about the "real" world, but is that to argue, as these people were, that stories altogether are not real or useful? So, Gigi, when you wanted your children to read great literature, what was that? Did you run across parents and teachers who wanted their librarian to do different?


message 336: by blueemerald (last edited May 24, 2012 02:51PM) (new)

blueemerald I work part time in a library as a volunteer. That falls somewhere in-between, eh?! (I think my avatar more than hints at my avocation!)


message 337: by Noel (new)

Noel Yale Unfortunately not. :)


message 338: by Gary (new)

Gary I volunteered in the high school library for 2 years,and loved it.....I should have gone to college to do that for a living, instead I became a teacher....


message 339: by Cormac (new)

Cormac Zoso wish i did ...


message 340: by Graham (new)

Graham I do it for service hours/extra cash


message 341: by Chelsea (new)

Chelsea I work in a library but I'm not a library. I re-stack shelves and keep the shelves organized and read in the many many stacks when my boss isn't around.


message 342: by Kamas (new)

Kamas Kirian I worked in a library while in college. It was probably the 2nd best job I've ever had. One day, when I retire, I love to work there again. If not, maybe I can start my own.


message 343: by Charlotte (new)

Charlotte Watson No. I have this thing called intelligence and an education. Well, two things, I guess.


message 344: by Charles (new)

Charles Charlotte wrote: "No. I have this thing called intelligence and an education. Well, two things, I guess."

Eh? You aren't because you're intelligent and educated? If this is what you meant to say, it raises a new question. We Goodreads people are naturally interested in the Booklust thing, recommendations and so forth. What do people know about how those books got into the library in the first place? Remember there are more than 60,000 new books published every year. Nobody is going to read them all. Book selectors in libraries have upwards of 95% success in predicting users' needs -- this is across the board in all types of libraries. What does it take for a person trained in art history, let's say, to correctly estimate the audience for a new book on Nietzsche, and perhaps summarize the relevance of the book to an undergraduate philosophy major when he hasn't read the book? And can't because it's not published until next month. (Remember, he's right 95% of the time. He's not guessing.) This same art historian might be hunting down rare books on the Harlem Renaissance, or obscure books of poetry for the creative writing program, evaluating the cost-effectiveness of a new database or a source of electronic books, etc. Irving Berlin made a famous distinction between the hedgehog, who knows one thing very well, and the fox, who knows something of a great many things. Librarians are pretty much foxes, and get dumped on a lot by hedgehogs, who consider them undereducated dilettantes. Justice for foxes! Foxes of the world arise, and take back your birthright!


message 345: by Turtle (new)

Turtle Oh crap. I voted wrong. I thought it said, "Would you" not "Do you".


message 346: by Tzn (new)

Tzn no...but I'd love to


message 347: by Tzn (new)

Tzn Dalene wrote: "Brian wrote: "Lucky??? trapped in a dying field?"

What makes you think it's a dying field??? Libraries are welcoming 60% more people than they did 10 years ago. We've been told we were going awa..."


I am getting jealous :)


message 348: by Carole (new)

Carole Yeaman Paul wrote: "Damn you 6 lucky people who voted yes!"

Paul wrote: "Damn you 6 lucky people who voted yes!"

Absolutely - one of the greatest jobs in the world & the only one for me.


message 349: by Richard (new)

Richard I am an (early) retired librarian.


message 350: by Kj (new)

Kj No but it would be my dream job!


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