M/M Books Written By Men
Vote/add books written by authors, either born male or self-identified as men. For certain titles, if you're not sure about the author's gender identity, please don't add them to this list.
101
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3.74 of 5 stars 3.74 avg rating — 439 ratings
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102
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4.09 of 5 stars 4.09 avg rating — 538 ratings
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103
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3.79 of 5 stars 3.79 avg rating — 409 ratings
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104
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4.38 of 5 stars 4.38 avg rating — 132 ratings
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105
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4.06 of 5 stars 4.06 avg rating — 888 ratings
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106
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4.05 of 5 stars 4.05 avg rating — 520 ratings
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107
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3.91 of 5 stars 3.91 avg rating — 311 ratings
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108
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3.43 of 5 stars 3.43 avg rating — 183 ratings
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109
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3.69 of 5 stars 3.69 avg rating — 376 ratings
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110
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3.97 of 5 stars 3.97 avg rating — 119 ratings
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111
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4.2 of 5 stars 4.20 avg rating — 441 ratings
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112
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3.9 of 5 stars 3.90 avg rating — 280 ratings
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113
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3.83 of 5 stars 3.83 avg rating — 195 ratings
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114
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4.06 of 5 stars 4.06 avg rating — 63 ratings
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115
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3.84 of 5 stars 3.84 avg rating — 430 ratings
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116
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3.99 of 5 stars 3.99 avg rating — 128 ratings
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117
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4.44 of 5 stars 4.44 avg rating — 85 ratings
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118
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4.26 of 5 stars 4.26 avg rating — 650 ratings
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119
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3.57 of 5 stars 3.57 avg rating — 585 ratings
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120
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3.73 of 5 stars 3.73 avg rating — 8,948 ratings
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121
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3.99 of 5 stars 3.99 avg rating — 393 ratings
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122
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3.92 of 5 stars 3.92 avg rating — 765 ratings
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123
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3.96 of 5 stars 3.96 avg rating — 509 ratings
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124
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3.96 of 5 stars 3.96 avg rating — 1,602 ratings
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125
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4.08 of 5 stars 4.08 avg rating — 1,763 ratings
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126
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4.22 of 5 stars 4.22 avg rating — 166 ratings
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126
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3.95 of 5 stars 3.95 avg rating — 165 ratings
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128
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3.51 of 5 stars 3.51 avg rating — 114 ratings
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129
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3.86 of 5 stars 3.86 avg rating — 210 ratings
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130
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3.88 of 5 stars 3.88 avg rating — 1,305 ratings
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130
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4.27 of 5 stars 4.27 avg rating — 294 ratings
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132
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3.86 of 5 stars 3.86 avg rating — 217 ratings
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133
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3.86 of 5 stars 3.86 avg rating — 887 ratings
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134
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4.02 of 5 stars 4.02 avg rating — 371 ratings
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134
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4.47 of 5 stars 4.47 avg rating — 68 ratings
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136
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4.15 of 5 stars 4.15 avg rating — 197 ratings
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137
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3.84 of 5 stars 3.84 avg rating — 704 ratings
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137
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3.93 of 5 stars 3.93 avg rating — 1,172 ratings
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139
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3.02 of 5 stars 3.02 avg rating — 61 ratings
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140
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4.41 of 5 stars 4.41 avg rating — 328 ratings
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141
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4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 123 ratings
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142
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3.87 of 5 stars 3.87 avg rating — 389 ratings
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143
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3.95 of 5 stars 3.95 avg rating — 404 ratings
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144
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4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 39 ratings
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145
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4.06 of 5 stars 4.06 avg rating — 149 ratings
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145
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4.03 of 5 stars 4.03 avg rating — 335 ratings
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147
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4.02 of 5 stars 4.02 avg rating — 714 ratings
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148
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4.49 of 5 stars 4.49 avg rating — 1,808 ratings
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149
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3.82 of 5 stars 3.82 avg rating — 1,596 ratings
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150
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3.4 of 5 stars 3.40 avg rating — 495 ratings
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151
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3.77 of 5 stars 3.77 avg rating — 608 ratings
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152
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4.03 of 5 stars 4.03 avg rating — 118 ratings
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152
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4.2 of 5 stars 4.20 avg rating — 40 ratings
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154
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4.08 of 5 stars 4.08 avg rating — 782 ratings
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155
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3.74 of 5 stars 3.74 avg rating — 419 ratings
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156
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3.84 of 5 stars 3.84 avg rating — 140 ratings
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156
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3.72 of 5 stars 3.72 avg rating — 629 ratings
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156
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3.91 of 5 stars 3.91 avg rating — 533 ratings
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159
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3.71 of 5 stars 3.71 avg rating — 282 ratings
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160
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3.96 of 5 stars 3.96 avg rating — 1,111 ratings
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161
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3.77 of 5 stars 3.77 avg rating — 69 ratings
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162
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3.67 of 5 stars 3.67 avg rating — 14,167 ratings
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163
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3.79 of 5 stars 3.79 avg rating — 4,788 ratings
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164
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3.65 of 5 stars 3.65 avg rating — 345 ratings
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164
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4.45 of 5 stars 4.45 avg rating — 280 ratings
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166
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4.26 of 5 stars 4.26 avg rating — 19 ratings
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167
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3.84 of 5 stars 3.84 avg rating — 96 ratings
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168
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3.9 of 5 stars 3.90 avg rating — 117 ratings
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169
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4.4 of 5 stars 4.40 avg rating — 389 ratings
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170
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4.09 of 5 stars 4.09 avg rating — 76 ratings
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170
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4.53 of 5 stars 4.53 avg rating — 36 ratings
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170
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4.51 of 5 stars 4.51 avg rating — 43 ratings
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170
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4.2 of 5 stars 4.20 avg rating — 464 ratings
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174
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4.56 of 5 stars 4.56 avg rating — 27 ratings
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175
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3.89 of 5 stars 3.89 avg rating — 711 ratings
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176
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3.69 of 5 stars 3.69 avg rating — 287 ratings
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177
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4.19 of 5 stars 4.19 avg rating — 36 ratings
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178
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3.63 of 5 stars 3.63 avg rating — 675 ratings
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179
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3.83 of 5 stars 3.83 avg rating — 216 ratings
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179
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3.86 of 5 stars 3.86 avg rating — 313 ratings
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181
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4.06 of 5 stars 4.06 avg rating — 31 ratings
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181
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4.05 of 5 stars 4.05 avg rating — 117 ratings
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181
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3.91 of 5 stars 3.91 avg rating — 87 ratings
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184
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3.71 of 5 stars 3.71 avg rating — 52 ratings
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185
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3.89 of 5 stars 3.89 avg rating — 97 ratings
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185
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3.72 of 5 stars 3.72 avg rating — 450 ratings
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185
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3.84 of 5 stars 3.84 avg rating — 386 ratings
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188
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3.85 of 5 stars 3.85 avg rating — 4,436 ratings
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188
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3.71 of 5 stars 3.71 avg rating — 217 ratings
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190
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3.75 of 5 stars 3.75 avg rating — 1,003 ratings
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190
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3.92 of 5 stars 3.92 avg rating — 421 ratings
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192
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3.72 of 5 stars 3.72 avg rating — 147 ratings
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192
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3.71 of 5 stars 3.71 avg rating — 420 ratings
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194
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3.48 of 5 stars 3.48 avg rating — 423 ratings
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195
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3.58 of 5 stars 3.58 avg rating — 180 ratings
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196
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3.86 of 5 stars 3.86 avg rating — 374 ratings
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196
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3.85 of 5 stars 3.85 avg rating — 253 ratings
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198
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3.87 of 5 stars 3.87 avg rating — 344 ratings
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199
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3.75 of 5 stars 3.75 avg rating — 2,166 ratings
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200
by
3.84 of 5 stars 3.84 avg rating — 316 ratings
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935 books · 619 voters · list created April 29th, 2010 by Nemesis (votes) .
96 likes · Like
Lists are re-scored approximately every 5 minutes.


Nemesis 3426 books
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LoriO. 6211 books
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Christy 2883 books
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M'rella 5419 books
325 friends
Alli 1002 books
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Feliz 1763 books
184 friends
Gaa-chan 6767 books
210 friends
La 626 books
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More voters…


Comments (showing 1-50 of 132) (132 new)


message 1: by Ravyn (last edited Jun 07, 2010 06:50PM) (new)

Ravyn What a weird list...you know there are tons of "male" authors who are actually women. I can't imagine this is all that accurate. Although to be frank, I don't know why it matters all that much to begin with.


message 2: by Leah (new)

Leah Hmm I definitely think differentiating gay erotica written by men is important. It's about sovereignty and entitlement really. Before the hateration begins I've read hundreds of books M/M books authored by women and have enjoyed them. At the same time I question what entitlement do mostly straight women think they have to not just write stories but create or reinforce representations of gay men that are often hetero-sexualized, overly feminine, emotional...and perhaps largely inaccurate. One's imagination is boundless but there is something to be said about respecting the representations of gay men that come from actual men. If it didn't matter why do many women authors use male pseudonyms? I sometimes view this as a form of colonization, the oppressor being women forcing themselves the few spaces queer men have. I liken it having your bachelorette party in a gay club. Okay the radical Black feminist scholar in me is shutting up now. It'd be interesting to hear what other folks have to say about this list.


message 3: by Ravyn (last edited Jun 09, 2010 03:49AM) (new)

Ravyn Woah, that is like a whole other way more serious discussion than the one I was trying to have. (Although I do get what you are saying, and I certainly would be interested to hear what other people think. But it's not gonna be me.)

I just meant that I personally don't really differentiate between male vs. female authors. And that goes for anything, m/m romance or otherwise. I just don't care. Maybe it's interesting to know, but for the most part, I just don't think about it.

Also, I was trying to point out that I think this list is kinda bizarre in its attempt to categorize the gender and sexuality of a bunch of m/m romance authors. I mean, come on! There's a lot of variability out there, and putting labels on folks doesn't really work all that great.

Finally, and maybe this is just petty, but not all those people on the list are men!


message 4: by Nemesis (new)

Nemesis If this list isn't accurate, it might be really useful to indicate here all those incorrectly added authors. And then, anyone with a librarian status can remove them.

This list isn't about m/m romance authors only; it's about books featuring gay or m/m relationships where the feelings of love may be present or not.

Being born a male it's a fact not a label. The gender identity it's another thing, and their sexuality, from my point of view, has nothing to do with the subject of "male authors". The purpose wasn't to assign attributes, to put them into some kind of categories. For me it doesn't matter the author's gender, but to some people it might (one reason being that gay relationships are described more realistically by a man instead of a woman), and this is where this list proves it's existence.
The plot, the characterization, these are the elements that should really count when choosing or evaluating a book.

I don't agree though with "faking" your gender in order to reach a larger target. But that's the author's choice, and I'm not the one to question it, since I don't know for sure what stands behind this decision. I guess writing means not only passion, but making some money out of it too.


message 5: by M. (last edited Jul 30, 2010 07:20AM) (new)

M. Kei I like to know the gender of the author to. As a gay man buried in a heterosexual majority, books are not just entertainment, they're also fellowship. When I read a book by a female author, it may be a very good book and I enjoy it, but it won't make me feel less lonely. When I read a book by a gay male author, I feel a sense of fellowship. When he depicts things that I recognize, or approaches things in a way that is familiar to me, I have that sudden lightness of feeling, "Aha! I know what he means! I am not alone!" Now perhaps I am fooling myself and every single item in a gay man's book is a complete and utter piece of fiction that he has no first hand knowledge of... but then again, maybe he does. He's more likely to have experienced it than a female author, at any rate.

These days there's no need to fake your gender to reach a larger audience -- the larger audience is women. The vast majority of readers of gay love stories are women. Speaking in generalities, female authors are usually better at providing what women want from a novel while male authors are usually better at providing what men want in a novel. Of course there are exceptions. But I will never forget the reader who posted a review to the draft of The Sallee Rovers with the complaint, "It sounds like it was written by a man!"

Um, yeah. It does. Because I'm a guy. Apparently, there's something wrong with men writing gay fiction... And that's why this list is needed.


message 6: by Ravyn (last edited Sep 19, 2010 11:51AM) (new)

Ravyn @M. - I definitely hear where you're coming from, and I can understand the appeal of having a "written by men" list of m/m romance. Although it's not always the case, romance novels written by men can take on a bit of a different tone than those written by women. As a female reader though, I'm pretty equal opportunity when it comes to m/m romance and I find that the sex of the author doesn't have much of an impact on my enjoyment. So it's just not something I tend to think about much. But that's just me.

The reason this list bugged me so much at first was because when I first saw it, there were a bunch of female authors (with male pseudonyms) on it. It just made me question the accuracy and efficacy of even having a list like this. And it reminded me of the ridiculousness of female writers using male pseudonyms to being with. I guess I don't really like the idea of trying to label authors like that, as if being a man would make someone an inherently "better" m/m romance writer or something.

Anyway, since then, most all of the female authors I initially noticed have been taken down, so at least the accuracy seems a bit improved. However -- I'm just going to say this even though many may argue with me -- I'm not convinced that Josh Lanyon is actually a man. "His" books are in several of the top spots, and that alone makes me a little leery of the list. Personally, I don't give a crap if Josh Lanyon is a man or not, and I don't want to belabor the point. I'm just saying that there are a number of things that are screwy with this list.

But anyway...

@M. - I find it pretty ridiculous that someone would review a m/m romance novel (or any novel) and complain that "It sounds like it was written by a man!" I mean, what a crazy thing to gripe about.


message 7: by Aleksandr (new)

Aleksandr Voinov I'd like for my books to be removed from that list.I find is disrespectful to my (female) co-writers Barbara Sheridan, Kate Cotoner and Raev Gray, who see their contribution as women subsumed into my work.

Also, to me it smells of sexism and I'm simply not comfortable being singled out. I want readers to read my books without them thinking about my plumbing or that of my co-writers - whom I work with for their voices, their talent, their passion, but never ever for their plumbing.


message 8: by Amara (new)

Amara Well said Aleksandr.


message 9: by Aleksandr (new)

Aleksandr Voinov I've now spent 20 minutes trying to work out how to remove my books from that list - 20 minutes I could have spent writing.

Argh. A list-savvy librarian to the rescue?


message 10: by Ravyn (last edited Sep 19, 2010 11:08AM) (new)

Ravyn I think I managed to delete your books - there were 2.

And I'm glad I'm not the only person who thinks this is a weird list. Oh well.


message 11: by Aleksandr (new)

Aleksandr Voinov It started with four or five - but I just checked, they are all gone now. Thank you!


message 12: by Aves (last edited Sep 19, 2010 11:25AM) (new)

Aves Raggiana I would never presume to declare myself non-sexist, non-chauvinistic or completely liberal-minded. I'm almost absolutely certain that sometimes, I am sexist, chauvinistic and not always as liberal minded as I fancy myself being. Evidently being a gay man myself has not prevented me from learning and believing the same stereotypes and presumptions as everybody else...

I have enjoyed immensely, the writing talents of both male and female m/m romance authors, willingly suspending disbelief and allowing them to take me to places and emotions with people who could only possibly exist in the imagination. I can't explain it or quite put my finger on it but there is something about the writing of a male writer, particularly an acknowledged gay male writer, that particularly holds my interest. It holds my interest in a different way, not necessarily a deeper or better way, but decidedly different, perhaps truer or closer to my own life experience. I hazard to say that the experience of living life as a self-identified homosexual male can't help but inform a gay male author's writing. Perhaps that is what I, as a gay male consumer of m/m romance, am unwittingly responding to.


message 13: by [deleted user] (last edited Sep 19, 2010 11:27AM) (new)

I'm with Blip 100% on this one. Can. of. worms.

Plus, both this list and the one created in response display a sexism and divisiveness that I'm uncomfortable with.


message 14: by Ravyn (new)

Ravyn To edit the list, you have to be a librarian. (And it's pretty easy to become one if you are interested.)

But if you are a librarian, there is an "Edit" link at the top of the page, right after the list description. Then there's a link to "remove particular books."


message 15: by Aleksandr (new)

Aleksandr Voinov @Aves - I do think that research & empathy is key. In the end, there's always caveat emptor - if I'm not sure if I'll relate to a new-to-me author, I'll read their free stories on their website. The time when you had to buy books "blind" is long over.

I'd not want to support an orientation/genetic gender test for writers - or artists, or really anybody else. Reminds me of a discussion where I talked to a woman who told me flat-out that any "lesbian" who'd ever slept with a man an enjoyed it wasn't a "real lesbian". It brings to mind my transgender friends who are being told they aren't "real men" or "real women".

I simply don't condone anything that tastes of sexism. And making my co-writers seemingly insignificant or invisible on this list feels like a kick in the face.


message 16: by Aleksandr (last edited Sep 19, 2010 11:33AM) (new)

Aleksandr Voinov @Kate - yeah. We really need a list for transpeople, for bisexuals, for straight women, straight men, straight transmen, straight transwomen....white writers, black writers, Asian writers....

And our beautiful community turns into a labelling fest. No, thanks.


message 17: by Jessica (last edited Sep 20, 2010 08:11PM) (new)

Jessica Freely @leah "At the same time I question what entitlement do mostly straight women think they have to not just write stories but create or reinforce representations of gay men that are often hetero-sexualized, overly feminine, emotional...and perhaps largely inaccurate."

I've heard this critique often and usually from other women who are activists or scholars in areas relating to power, social dynamics, and culture. I think the characterization of straight women as a mainstream, colonizing force ignores the fact that straight male sexuality and straight female sexuality are not the same thing, and do not enjoy the same cultural privileges. In fact, male violence denies women their sexual agency, and there are very few cultural outlets for women who wish to express a desire for men in a non-heteronormative way.

In my opinion, m/m is one of those outlets.

I have no beef with gay men who want to read books by other gay men. Makes total sense to me. But to place this list in the context of a genre largely composed of women writing about men from a non-straight-male-mediated perspective does come across to me as judgemental, and that I do object to.


message 18: by K.Z. (new)

K.Z. Snow Hm. I'd like to meet the "librarian" who traversed the globe performing crotch checks on all these authors. I'd shake that person's hand, I would.

Well...then again, maybe not.

But I do have to applaud this divisive effort. The human population definitely needs more precise segregation.


message 19: by Arlene (new)

Arlene Leah wrote: "Hmm I definitely think differentiating gay erotica written by men is important. It's about sovereignty and entitlement really. Before the hateration begins I've read hundreds of books M/M books aut..."

I agree with you 300%,only a man knows men's feelings beyond imagination. I have read fantastic books by woman but I respect when men write more for their experiences etched into their fiction.


message 20: by Talyn (new)

Talyn How am I supposed to order "How to Rape a Straight Guy" --if it's available on hold at my library--WITHOUT seeming to be a freak of nature by the Librarians? -___-


message 21: by Dusk (new)

Dusk Peterson I'm flattered that three people liked Life Prison enough to vote for it, but my gender identity is actually non-gendered/androgynous, so my books don't belong on any "written by men" or "written by women" lists.

(And you know, I really feel uncomfortable having to offer that "truth in advertising" moment, because I like for my readers to be able to envision me in whatever manner they prefer.)


message 22: by Park (last edited Nov 03, 2011 08:27AM) (new)

Park What if you want real gay male experiences written by real gay male authors. Not women just writing about men having sex with men. That is what this list means to me.

I could write a book about what it's like to be a woman, but I am not one. That would matter to some people.


message 23: by K.Z. (new)

K.Z. Snow Steve wrote: "What if you want real gay male experiences written by real gay male authors. Not women just writing about men having sex with men. That is what this list means to me."

Perfectly understandable. However, if you're looking for real gay male authors, this isn't the list to go by. Too many females keep turning up on it. (There's at least one on there now.)


message 24: by M. (new)

M. Kei Anyone can read and write anything they want. Some of us like certain things and want to find more of it. This list is to help people who like m/m books written by men find more of them. No, it's not perfect, but it's a start.

There's a zillion lists out there. Lists for cat people. Lists for older characters. Lists for non-sexual books. Lists for everything. Nobody goes to the cat people lists and moans about how divisive it is that people are so narrow-minded they insist on playing the label game. I don't care to read books about cat people, but that in no way implies that they shouldn't write it, read it, and make lists about it. I expect the same courtesy extended to my taste in reading.


message 25: by Ravyn (last edited Nov 03, 2011 04:02PM) (new)

Ravyn The problem that people (including myself) have with this list is that it focuses on an author's personal identity rather than the book content. Personal identity is...well...personal, and dividing books out based on sex of the author just feels icky somehow. When I see this list, I feel like its implied message is that male authors of gay fic are perhaps preferable than female authors. Of course I realize it wasn't intended that way, but it's how I feel, and I think that might be how others feel as well when they see and object to this list. If someone set up a list for "books written by white heterosexual men" I think more than a few people would have a problem with it, and to me, this list isn't any different than that.

Don't get me wrong, I think lists are great when it comes to dividing out subject content so people can find what they are looking for (or what they aren't looking for). If I want to read about cat people, or older characters, or vampires, or BDSM, or books involving fruit sex, then great. Let's make a list. If I do or don't want to read about BDSM, then that's fine, it's my personal taste. But if I don't want to read books written by women, then that's prejudice. And to me at least, that's what makes this list different from all the rest.


message 26: by Aves (last edited Nov 04, 2011 08:08AM) (new)

Aves Raggiana This topic is the source of so much debate and consternation. If women want to write books having to do with gay male love and sex, so be it. I’ve certainly enjoyed my fair share. And I would have regretted turning down many books and thus denying myself the pleasure of reading some very beautifully told stories if I had turned them down on the basis of the gender of writer.

Still, it grabs my attention when a male author like Damon Suede comes out with an unabashed romance story involving two men. Other male authors whose works are romantic and relational in content, rather than plot driven, are Kyell Gold. Men, who write about this type of subject matter are rare indeed, it seems like the romance genre or works of a romance nature do not come as naturally to men as they do to women.

Right now, I’m thinking of Tere Michael’s “Faith & Fidelity”. I love that story so much, and I’ve so fallen so much in love with its protagonists, Matt and Evan, that I’ve read it at least half a dozen times. Their story is written with such fluency and sagacity, coming as it does from a woman's preternatural focus on relationship development, that it’s hard for me to imagine that a man could have ever written a story like that, and in that graceful manner. Come on, really? Could you ever imagine a man, gay or straight. coming up with such beautifully told tale? A better known and equally contemporary example is Annie Proulx’s “Brokeback Mountain”. Could a man have come up with such an astonishing gem of a novella?

As a corollary, could anyone but a woman have come up with works such as Elizabeth Gilbert’s “Eat, Love, Pray” or “Committed”with its relentless self-absorption and stark longing for connection with anyone, anywhere and in any form?

I wouldn’t mind a list of works written by white heterosexual men anymore than I would mind a list of works written by black heterosexual men or Asian pansexual women. The author’s personal identity does matter to a reader like me because inevitably the author’s personal identity informs the content and style of their work.

I wouldn’t have missed reading any of Tere Michael’s books for anything in the world, and yet it always captures my interest when male authors attempt, with varying degrees of success, to cover the same territory that seems to be the natural inclination and literary province of women.


message 27: by Aves (last edited Nov 05, 2011 06:49AM) (new)

Aves Raggiana Wait, I just noticed Josh Lanyon on this list. Is he a man? I’m not at all convinced he/she is.


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

Aves wrote: "Wait, I just noticed Josh Lanyon on this list. Is he man? I’m not so sure he/she/they are."

One of perennial questions among m/m readers.


message 29: by Aves (last edited Nov 05, 2011 06:49AM) (new)

Aves Raggiana Let me pour more kerosene on the fire here.

During a cursory walkthrough of the contemporary romantic fiction and “Romance New Releases” section of my local Barnes & Noble Bookstore, covering two aisles, I immediately noticed that all, I mean ALL, the authors were women.

Every glossy cover graced with a heaving, ripped bodice bosom and Fabio-inspired sweaty bare chest had a woman’s name emblazoned below the title.

If romance fiction is a genre peopled by overwhelmingly female writers, should it come as any surprise that a list like “M/M Books Written By Men" would pique my interest?


message 30: by [deleted user] (new)

Aves wrote: "Every glossy cover graced with a heaving, ripped bodice bosom and Fabio-inspired sweaty bare chest had a woman’s name emblazoned below the title. "

That's just packaging. Lots of male authors and husband/wife pairs write romance but they do it under a female pseudonym because the publishers require it and because it sells better. What's in a name, after all?


message 31: by K.Z. (last edited Nov 05, 2011 09:11AM) (new)

K.Z. Snow Kate Mc. wrote: "What's in a name, after all?"

When it comes to certain types of genre fiction, not much.

Having one's interest piqued by the label M/M Books Written by Men is understandable. But what happens when you find out, a month or a year down the road, that the m/m romance you thought was written by a male was actually written by a female?

I'm afraid this list just isn't very reliable -- unless the "listers" know the authors personally -- because it's based on often erroneous assumptions of gender.


message 32: by Jaime (new)

Jaime Kate Mc. wrote: "Aves wrote: "Wait, I just noticed Josh Lanyon on this list. Is he man? I’m not so sure he/she/they are."

One of perennial questions among m/m readers."


Really?


message 33: by Aves (new)

Aves Raggiana K.Z. wrote: "But what happens when you find out, a month or a year down the road, that the m/m romance you thought was written by a male was actually written by a female? "

It’s already happened. More than once.

I’m surprised, angry and then crushed by the dispiriting realization that when it comes to writing soaring, mellifluous prose befitting a romance genre novel, men are literary cripples, The Bard and to a lesser extent Leo Tolstoy notwithstanding.


message 34: by Aves (new)

Aves Raggiana Kate Mc. wrote: "That's just packaging. Lots of male authors and husband/wife pairs write romance but they do it under a female pseudonym because the publishers require it and because it sells better. What's in a name, after all? "

Really?! I wasn’t aware of that. So this works on the corollary premise of writers of m/m fiction, romance and otherwise. More m/m fiction titles sell if they appear to be written by men than if they appear to be written by women?


message 35: by Lou (new)

Lou Harper Imo, lists based on the authors' gender or sexual orientation is arbitrary, and I won't vote. Why not romances written by redheads?


message 36: by [deleted user] (new)

Aves wrote: "So this works on the corollary premise of writers of m/m fiction, romance and otherwise. More m/m fiction titles sell if they appear to be written by men than if they appear to be written by women? "

I don't know why people choose a particular sex or pseudonym to write under. It's just a persona. "Name on the cover" doesn't necessarily equal "real person".


message 37: by Aves (new)

Aves Raggiana Lou wrote: "Imo, lists based on the authors' gender or sexual orientation is arbitrary, and I won't vote. Why not romances written by redheads?"

Why not? Or a list of Turgid Literary Tomes written by Russian Angry-Depressives of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century?

The above criteria may be very important and not at all arbitrary for some readers. The sex/gender of the writer of a work of m/m romance/fiction is of some importance to me, and it does not preclude my selection or enjoyment of said works written by women. I just really do want to know.


message 38: by K.Z. (last edited Nov 05, 2011 10:01AM) (new)

K.Z. Snow Aves wrote: "It’s already happened. More than once."

Then . . . what's the point of consulting these lists if they can't be trusted? That's the part I don't get.


message 39: by Aves (new)

Aves Raggiana K.Z. wrote: "Aves wrote: "It’s already happened. More than once."

Then . . . what's the point of consulting these lists if they're notoriously unreliable? That's the part I don't get."


Not much, really. I’ve only looked at this list a few times, mainly to join in the debate about the paucity of male writers of m/m romance and mainly as a springboard to search out other putatively male authors of m/m romance fiction. As I said, there aren’t many anyway.


message 40: by [deleted user] (last edited Nov 05, 2011 10:07AM) (new)

Aves wrote: "The sex/gender of the writer of a work of m/m romance/fiction is of some importance to me, and it does not preclude my selection or enjoyment of said works written by women. I just really do want to know. "

Then I think you will be stuck with guessing and conjecture. Lists like these are pointless, really. The people who add books to them have no more knowledge than you do. Because the authors themselves aren't going to say, nor should they have to.


message 41: by K.Z. (new)

K.Z. Snow Kate Mc. wrote: "The people who add books to them have no more knowledge than you do."

That's it exactly -- unless, of course, the reader adding the title knows the author personally, in RL.


message 42: by Lou (new)

Lou Harper Aves wrote: "Lou wrote: "Imo, lists based on the authors' gender or sexual orientation is arbitrary, and I won't vote. Why not romances written by redheads?"

Why not? Or a list of Turgid Literary Tomes writte..."


First of all, because it opens a box of ugly. This whole must-know stance smacks too much of our tabloid obsessed culture. Where does it stop? Do we also must know their sex life?

If a writer identify themselves under different gender than they really are, I don't understand it, but I respect it.

Not to mention, this list confuses m/m and gay fiction. In The Line of Beauty is so not m/m.


message 43: by K.Z. (last edited Nov 05, 2011 10:36AM) (new)

K.Z. Snow And that's yet another can of worms, Lou. Where/how does one draw the line between m/m fiction and gay fiction? I realize there's supposed to be some "literary value" criterion involved, but I challenge anybody to define it. (The romance element is, I guess, a determining factor, but plenty of books viewed as literary gay fiction contain romantic relationships. So that particular division also leaves me befuddled.)


message 44: by Lou (last edited Nov 05, 2011 10:25AM) (new)

Lou Harper K.Z. wrote: "And that's yet another can of worms, Lou. Where/how does on draw the line between m/m fiction and gay fiction? I realize there's supposed to be some "literary value" criterion involved, but I chall..."

For start, m/m is a sub-genre of romance. If it's not romance, it's not m/m, no matter how many gay men are in it.

There has been an an excellent thread about this very subject not long ago.


message 45: by [deleted user] (new)

Lou wrote: "If a writer identify themselves under different gender than they really are, I don't understand it, but I respect it."

Gender isn't that straight (pun!!) forward an issue. Which makes this whole discussion even weirder. Lots of trans and/or genderqueer people write m/m. If an ftm is writing as a male are they "misleading" you or being open with you? Personally, I don't care as long as they write good books that I want to read. The rest smacks of prying too deeply into personal lives that aren't any of my business.


message 46: by Aves (new)

Aves Raggiana K.Z. wrote: "And that's yet another can of worms, Lou. Where/how does one draw the line between m/m fiction and gay fiction? I realize there's supposed to be some "literary value" criterion involved, but I chal..."


I’m at a loss to define it too. Fans of m/m romance fiction, overwhelmingly women, are generally not interested in gay fiction, works written by Michael Thomas Ford, Mel Keegan, E. Lynn Harris, Michael Cunningham, Christopher Isherwood, Armisted Maupin and the like. These authors are more likely to be found on the bookshelves of gay male readers and the dwindling number of independent gay bookstores.


message 47: by Lou (last edited Nov 05, 2011 10:39AM) (new)

Lou Harper Kate Mc. wrote: "Gender isn't that straight (pun!!) forward an issue. Which makes this whole discussion even weirder."

Yes. In this genre half the writers and readers identify as a "gay man trapped in a woman's body." Lambda recently rescinded their panty-check policy. I always wondered what the heck stopped me (or anyone) from declaring to be bisexual.


message 48: by Aves (new)

Aves Raggiana Lou wrote: "First of all, because it opens a box of ugly. This whole must-know stance smacks too much of our tabloid obsessed culture. Where does it stop? Do we also must know their sex life?"

It can open a box of ugly, ugliness in my case coming primarily and eventually in the form of what I’ve stated before: disappointment in the inability and indifference by male authors to write gripping and beautiful m/m romance fiction.

If I get my fix for m/m romance fiction from women writers then so be it, but if I can also find it with male authors, that’s a rare find indeed.

I don’t see the connection between inquiring about the sex of a writer and our tabloid obsessed culture and wanting to know about their sex lives.

And I agree with Kate Mc. Writers of m/m romance fiction are under no compulsion to reveal their actual gender. Their reasons for hiding and disguising it are as personal and varied as mine are for wanting to know.


message 49: by Lou (last edited Nov 05, 2011 10:52AM) (new)

Lou Harper Aves wrote: "I’m at a loss to define it too. Fans of m/m romance fiction, overwhelmingly women, are generally not interested in gay fiction, works written by Michael Thomas Ford, Mel Keegan, E. Lynn Harris, Michael Cunningham, Christopher Isherwood, Armisted Maupin and the like. These authors are more likely to be found on the bookshelves of gay male readers and the dwindling number of independent gay bookstores. "

Just watching the community I've came to the conclusion that there are two main camps of m/m readers. One I call the "purists" who are mainly romance readers and likely to also read het (erotic) romance and romantic fiction, but won't touch outright erotica or gay fiction. The other groups is the "naughties" who are likely to also enjoy erotica without romance, and gay fiction as well. I count myself in the second group. I read classic romantic fiction like Jane Austen, but won't touch het romance. However, I enjoy James Lear - whose books are erotica, despite their thin romantic disguise. I've also read Isherwood, Hollinghurst, James Kirkwood. There's also a nice smattering of gay mysteries about that are not romance.

One of the problems is that gay fiction often erroneously gets listed under m/m.


message 50: by Lou (last edited Nov 05, 2011 11:02AM) (new)

Lou Harper Aves wrote: "It can open a box of ugly, ugliness in my case coming primarily and eventually in the form of what I’ve stated before: disappointment in the inability and indifference by male authors to write gripping and beautiful m/m romance fiction.

If I get my fix for m/m romance fiction from women writers then so be it, but if I can also find it with male authors, that’s a rare find indeed."


However, this line of questioning leads to the gleeful outing of women writing as men. There's a definite witch-hunt quality to that.

The romance genre in general is female dominated, and that has to do with tradition and culture in general. Men are supposed to be manly, not read or write romance. It's changing though.

I'm more interested in men who read romance, straight or gay, because it's not something men, even gay men, often own up to. Honestly, sometimes I suspect that some male-identified m/m readers are actually women in disguise.


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