Candiss Candiss's Comments


Candiss's comments from the Pick-a-Shelf group.

Note: Candiss is no longer a member of this group.

(showing 81-100 of 243)

8565 As I'm actually almost done (finally...) with my July/Australian book, I'll go ahead and commit to something for August.

I don't really have time for a thoughtful read of a non-fiction ancient history choice right now, or I'd definitely read something in that vein.

I'll be reading Death Comes As the End by Agatha Christie, a very unusual book for her, as it takes place in ancient Egypt. It fulfills both this shelf challenge and another challenge I have for classics (Christie is always a 20th century classic, in my book.) and yet a third challenge involving death while in a foreign locale. Win-win-win! :)
LOST - 2012 (189 new)
Jul 07, 2012 08:07AM

8565 I've finished The Stepford Wives. Wow! It was much better than I had expected it to be. It's much subtler than either of the movie versions, and it feels so tense throughout. The message gets through succinctly without being heavy-handed...a classic of speculative fiction and the fiction of social criticism.


1. Bless Me, Ultima - Rudolfo Anaya
2. The War of the Worlds - H.G. Wells
3. Her Smoke Rose Up Forever - James Tiptree, Jr.
4. 84, Charing Cross Road - Helene Hanff
5. Murder on the Orient Express - Agatha Christie
6. Wide Sargasso Sea - Jean Rhys
7. The Old Man and the Sea - Ernest Hemingway
8. Kitchen - Banana Yoshimoto
9. Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
10. The Stepford Wives - Ira Levin

Edit to add August 11: I'm removing Childhood's End from my LOST list. I tried, but I just couldn't get into it at this time. I'm subbing in Murder on the Orient Express, as it's also been on my shelf for years and years.
LOST - 2012 (189 new)
Jun 30, 2012 01:36PM

8565 I've finished Wide Sargasso Sea. It was sad but good.

1. Bless Me, Ultima - Rudolfo Anaya
2. The War of the Worlds - H.G. Wells
3. Her Smoke Rose Up Forever - James Tiptree, Jr.
4. 84, Charing Cross Road - Helene Hanff
5. Childhood's End - Arthur C. Clarke
6. Wide Sargasso Sea - Jean Rhys
7. The Old Man and the Sea - Ernest Hemingway
8. Kitchen - Banana Yoshimoto
9. The Left Hand Of Darkness - Ursula K. Le Guin
10. The Stepford Wives - Ira Levin
8565 I expect to only get to one for this shelf in July, due to other reading and life commitments, but there is one on the shelf that I am already reading: The Etched City by K.J. Bishop. I am so pleased I'm finally going to read this!


Because it's such fun to go through the shelves: If I had more time, I would include something by Kate Morton (either The Distant Hours or The Forgotten Garden,) either Tender Morsels or a collection by Margo Lanagan, and Remembering Babylon by David Malouf.
8565 I'm going to try for Wide Sargasso Sea and The Golden Compass.
Shelf Picker (1408 new)
May 28, 2012 12:26AM

8565 Vivian wrote: "Great shelf! But can someone explain why A Light in the Attic is on there?"

It makes little sense to me, either, Vivian, but then neither do most bans.

I Googled it, and several "reasons" were cited on differing occasions of challenge/attempt to ban: glorifying violence, satanism, suicide, and cannibalism, "supernatural elements" such as demons and ghosts, and "suggestive illustrations", as well as encouraging children to be "disobedient"
Shelf Picker (1408 new)
May 24, 2012 12:03PM

8565 Wonderful shelf choice! I will always take any "excuse" to read banned books. I find the book banning phenomenon repulsive in the extreme.

(Oh my goodness...I just realized I actually managed to get something read for this month's Horror shelf pick, and I haven't reviewed it. I'll try to get that done in the next couple of days. *jots note to self*)
LOST - 2012 (189 new)
May 20, 2012 06:53PM

8565 I just finished The Old Man and the Sea and really enjoyed it. There's one off my bucket list!

1. Bless Me, Ultima - Rudolfo Anaya
2. The War of the Worlds - H.G. Wells
3. Her Smoke Rose Up Forever - James Tiptree, Jr.
4. 84, Charing Cross Road - Helene Hanff
5. Childhood's End - Arthur C. Clarke
6. Wide Sargasso Sea - Jean Rhys
7. The Old Man and the Sea - Ernest Hemingway
8. Kitchen - Banana Yoshimoto
9. The Left Hand Of Darkness - Ursula K. Le Guin
10. The Stepford Wives - Ira Levin


(I had to change my list up, as I couldn't get hold of one.)
LOST - 2012 (189 new)
May 17, 2012 10:56PM

8565 I just finished Kitchen by Banana Yoshimoto and loved it. It was both poignant and hope-filled. My Goodreads review is here..

1. Bless Me, Ultima - Rudolfo Anaya
2. The War of the Worlds - H.G. Wells
3. Her Smoke Rose Up Forever - James Tiptree, Jr.
4. 84, Charing Cross Road - Helene Hanff
5. Childhood's End by Arthur C. Clarke
6. Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
7. The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
8. The Palm-wine Drinkard by Amos Tutuola
9. Kitchen by Banana Yoshimoto
10. The Left Hand Of Darkness - Ursula K. Le Guin
8565 From The Wind Through the Keyhole:

"Time is a keyhole, he thought as he looked up at the stars. Yes, I think so. We sometimes bend and peer through it. And the wind we feel on our cheeks when we do---the wind that blows through the keyhole---is the breath of all the living universe."
May 04, 2012 07:30PM

8565 Great news!
Apr 28, 2012 01:12PM

8565 KarenF wrote: "I'm going for The Gunslinger (read a ton of Stephen King but never any Dark Tower) and The Restorer.

Time permitting I may also try Ghost Story."


KarenF - FYI, the Dark Tower series does have some (really) horrific elements, but the overall series is more fantasy than horror. (I'd say something like 80% fantasy/20% horror.) The first book, a fix-up of several stories King wrote back in the '70s, is less horrific than the others. It is part fantasy, part western, with horror elements.

I love the series, but if you've read a bunch of other King, you may be let down if you're expecting horror. The series gets better as it evolves, and the first book feels like a prequel to me; it's much less taut and interesting than book 2, for example, so if you like it at all, I highly recommend reading the 2nd book, as it's (in my opinion) the real "beginning" of the series and is much more exciting, with diverse and complex characters. (I read the entire series a couple of years ago during one marathon week during a heat wave. If I hadn't been determined to do so - on enthusiastic recommendation of my boyfriend - I might have stopped reading after book 1, had I not been assured it would get much better in book 2.)

/Dark Tower nerd rant off

Happy reading!
Apr 28, 2012 10:52AM

LOST - 2012 (189 new)
Apr 25, 2012 01:18AM

8565 I signed up for the challenge widget on the group homepage in January, but I somehow managed to neglect to post a list in this thread. I'm done with 3 at this point.


1. Bless Me, Ultima - Rudolfo Anaya
2. The War of the Worlds - H.G. Wells
3. Her Smoke Rose Up Forever - James Tiptree, Jr.
4. 84, Charing Cross Road - Helene Hanff
5. Childhood's End by Arthur C. Clarke
6. Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
7. The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
8. The Palm-wine Drinkard by Amos Tutuola
9. Kitchen by Banana Yoshimoto
10. The Left Hand Of Darkness - Ursula K. Le Guin

Edit to add: I've had to switch out a couple due to not having them available and have swapped in replacements that have been on my TBR equally long.
Shelf Picker (1408 new)
Apr 23, 2012 10:03AM

8565 Vi wrote: "OK! I'm done with my selection. I was about to go for Folklore when I noticed that Horror has not been done before. I haven't read many Horror books before and I hope that I'll get to some (okay, q..."

That's a great choice, Vi! Between classic horror, monster stories, gothics, many crime thrillers, many mysteries, and lots of paranormal romance/urban fantasy-type stuff, even people who don't read a lot of horror books can find something that suits their fancy.
Shelf Picker (1408 new)
Apr 22, 2012 11:05PM

8565 Vi wrote: "Thanks, guys! Just got back today morning.

I took a look at the shelf page and I can see only 150 shelves. I'm probably being dumb but could someone tell me how to see more than 150? Top Shelves"


I believe it used to show more than that, with pages and pages of shelves for viewing. Have the Goodreads people changed something again? I only see 150 on Top Shelves now, too.

Here is the only way I found to see more: Go to Explore at the top of any Goodreads page. Over on the right there is a list of Genres. Click "More genres..." beneath that listing. That brings you to a page called Genres > Shelves, which can be directly accessed at this link:

http://www.goodreads.com/genres/list

There are only 3 pages of shelves, but those seem to be the most commonly-used shelf titles among Goodreads users. I think they are trying to re-organize every aspect of the site to reflect genres and sub-genres; while people can still create obscure, personalized shelf titles, they don't seem to publicly list and offer up ones without a significant number of users.

Unless I'm missing something fundamental, in which case I hope someone else can give another answer. :)
8565 As usual, I'm working through a multi-month challenge in a themed group, so my picks have to fit challenge tasks. That said, I have a place in my task set for these and will make sure I get at least one of them read:

The Mirage: A Novel - Matt Ruff
Bitter Seeds - Ian Tregellis
Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter - Seth Grahame-Smith


Also of great interest to me:


Yellow Blue Tibia - Adam Roberts
The Years of Rice and Salt - Kim Stanley Robinson
Pavane - Keith Roberts


...and many more, of course.
Shelf Picker (1408 new)
Mar 21, 2012 08:38PM

8565 Great choice, Scott! I'm off to the shelf...
Shelf Picker (1408 new)
Mar 21, 2012 02:35PM

8565 Congratulations, Scott. Have fun choosing!
Mar 12, 2012 03:49PM

8565 Congrats, Lyn M!


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