Richard Richard's Comments (member since Jan 03, 2012)


Richard's comments from the Indian Readers group.

(showing 1-19 of 19)

Apr 10, 2015 12:29PM

729 Hello, I am a longtime member of this group, and a beginning author. I have been asked to write a short story on the artist Amrita Sher-Gil, who is well-known and respected in India but sadly little-known in Canada. I have ordered a recent biography of her and I am reading through it with interest. But what I am looking for is links to good online information about her (English language preferred please). And specifically I would like to find out about one important moment in her life which was very important for her later artistic development: her visit to the Ajanta caves where she found religious art relating to the past lives of the Buddha. Information about the caves themselves will be helpful as well. Thanks to anyone who can assist.
Mar 26, 2015 11:09AM

729 Hello, I am a longtime member of this group, and a beginning author. I have been asked to write a short story on the artist Amrita Sher-Gil, who is well-known and respected in India but sadly little-known in Canada. I have ordered a recent biography of her but it may take some time to arrive. So what I am looking for is links to good online information about her. And specifically I would like to find out about one important moment in her life which was very important for her later artistic development: her visit to the Ajanta caves where she found religious art relating to the life (lives) of the Buddha. Thanks to anyone who can assist.
Aug 24, 2012 11:26AM

729 Kunal wrote: "...and richard, it's always a pleasure interacting with you. we really must participate in a group read here, soon."

That sounds like a great idea!
Aug 23, 2012 11:57PM

729 Kunal said: "Richard and Dely: thanks so much. It would be available for international readers at amazon and ebay in some time. I shall update you both, then."

Thanks, Kunal! Looking forward to that.
Aug 17, 2012 10:21PM

729 Congratulations, Kunal! This is very exciting news. I'm very happy for you.
5 stars (43 new)
Jun 24, 2012 07:42PM

729 Srinivas wrote: "@Richard,Kunal,Sherin and Dely

hey please mention a book at a time,

due to lists i added more than 10 books."


Good for you, Srinivas! :)
5 stars (43 new)
Jun 24, 2012 05:12PM

Jun 12, 2012 12:00AM

729 Aravind wrote: "Richard wrote: "Aravind wrote: "I did a world tour underwater in a submarine called Nautilius!"

Under the guidance of Captain Nemo (= Nobody) in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. I wonder wha..."


I'm glad that you did not fall in, and that things turned out well in the end.

@Sherin: Have seen the film of The Other Boleyn Girl which was quite good, but haven't read the novel.
Jun 11, 2012 09:33PM

729 Aravind wrote: "I did a world tour underwater in a submarine called Nautilius!"

Under the guidance of Captain Nemo (= Nobody) in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. I wonder what country you would be in if you read A Journey To The Center Of The Earth?
Jun 10, 2012 12:06AM

729 Kunal wrote: "'Anne of the Green Gables' is quite possibly one of my ten favorite classics of all time. A heartrending, beautiful book!"

It has some unforgettable characters who are very vividly drawn. I think Lucy Maud Montgomery would be surprised and gratified to know that this book has touched people's lives all over the world.
Jun 09, 2012 09:56PM

729 Aditya wrote: "Nah, i wasn't questioning the theme of the novel as such, i was just trying to suggest it as a topic of debate.

Being single and adopting a child was kind of a fantasy for me once upon a time, but..."


I think it would depend on the man. And in Canada, I think it is legal for a single man to adopt a child as long as he is over 18 years of age and does not have a criminal record. I'm a single man myself, but I don't believe I could handle either the responsibility or the expense of raising a child on my own.
Jun 09, 2012 09:29PM

729 Aditya wrote: "Should single men be allowed to adopt children?"

Nowadays I would say, probably not--although I suppose it depends on the man. But this is a novel first published in 1908, and set (probably) in the 19th century, in rural Csnada. There is no hint of sexual (or other) impropriety, the worst sin in these parts being that of gossip. And the brother (Matthew) leaves most of the bringing up of Anne to his sister (Marilla) and only "puts his oar in" once in a while when it really matters.
Jun 09, 2012 08:44PM

729 This sounds like the dilemma that starts off Anne of Green Gables. A couple (actually a bachelor and his unmarried sister) decide to adopt a boy to help out with farm work. There is a mixup and they end up with a girl instead. Adventure ensues...
May 20, 2012 09:29PM

729 Aravind wrote: "Yeah, it was really tough with long punctuated and allegoric lines. I like such prose, but I was in some hurry. I have learned that such books should only be read leisurely. This was my first Dickens, I haven't read much of Victorian age literature either. :)"

I have been reading Dickens for a long time and I found it tough too! For something less difficult but still a classic and very enjoyable try A Christmas Carol.
May 20, 2012 08:27AM

729 Aravind wrote: "Update:

France: A Tale of two Cities [...]"


The Dickens was hard to get through, but in the end I found it worthwhile. The author researched for this novel quite carefully. Last year, I led a book club discussion on it!
Mar 30, 2012 07:38AM

729 Parikhit wrote: "Aravind wrote: "Sherin wrote: "Aravind wrote: "After witnessing dramatic events in Paris in A Tale of Two Cities, I am now in a sinister dark castle with plenty of bolted closed rooms o..."

Madame Defarge is one of the more vividly drawn characters. Perhaps that is what Aravind means. I read this book last year, but I can still remember how frightening she seemed, even in the beginning of the novel, when she did nothing but sit in silence, knit and watch everything that went on. Dickens is very good at creating characters who stick in the memory.
Mar 25, 2012 08:09AM

729 Vinoth wrote: "The novel is predominantly in Pacific then followed by Pondicherry and Mexico... so Pacific it is..I came to know how to de-shell and eat turtles(raw) if you are stranded in a lifeboat in the Pacif..."

What happens if there's a tiger in the boat with you and he wants something for dinner? Will you or the turtle be the main course? ;)
Mar 18, 2012 09:26AM

729 Dely, Thank you for that explanation. I know a little about Hinduism, having read a few sacred texts (in English translation) and some basic introductory material. But I am by no means an expert. This gives me a much better idea of how the stories are connected.
Mar 17, 2012 05:53PM

729 I enjoyed this book quite a lot, however there were some things that startled me about it. I was somewhat shocked at the prominence of erotica in some of the stories although perhaps I should not have been. (I don't want to be any more explicit--if you'll pardon my word choice--lest it tempt me into a spoiler.)

In general, Chandra has protagonists who are quite introspective, and he seems to approach his characters and stories in a way that at first seems somehow detached, but ends up being intense. For example, in "Dharma" the reader meets Jago Antia, someone who is military, rigid and in tight control of himself; by the end one discovers a man whose life is full of pain and tragedy. Similarly, the reader comes to empathize with the hurt and fragility of Sartaj ("Kama"), Iqbal ("Artha") and Shiv ("Shanti"). For myself, though, this is less true of Sheila in "Shakti" and I wonder if that's because Chandra was just indulging in a cutting satire of social climbers or because he is less adept at portraying female protagonists.

A theme which seems to run through all the stories is that of a quest to be achieved or a mystery to be solved, in other words, a journey toward understanding.


topics created by Richard