Jennifer D Jennifer's Comments (member since Mar 23, 2011)


Jennifer's comments from the CBC Books group.

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Apr 04, 2016 03:45PM

40089 welcome to you both, sherry and erin! we hope you enjoy this space and find it helpful for discovering some great new CanLit reads! :)
Apr 04, 2016 03:22PM

40089

The League of Canadian Poets has announced shortlists for three of their biggest awards: the Gerald Lampert Memorial Award, the Pat Lowther Memorial Award and Raymond Souster Award. Governor General's Literary Award-winning poet Lorna Crozier has snagged two nominations for her poetry collection The Wrong Cat.

Rosanna Deerchild, host of CBC Radio's Unreserved, is also nominated for her collection Calling Down the Sky. Cree poet Marilyn Dumont has made the shortlist for The Pemmican Eaters.

Cassidy McFadzean is nominated in the debut poetry collection category for Hacker Packer, which includes her shortlisted entry for the 2013 CBC Poetry Prize, On Naming and the Origin of Pity.

The full list of finalists is listed below.


Finalists for the $1,000 Gerald Lampert Memorial Award, given to a debut poetry collection by a Canadian poet published in the preceding year, include:

* Rue by Melissa Bull
* Laws & Locks by Chad Campbell
* Transmitter and Receiver by Raoul Fernandes
* Otter by Ben Ladouceur
* Hacker Packer by Cassidy McFadzean
* Mockingbird by Derek Webster


Finalists for the $1,000 Pat Lowther Memorial Award, which honours poetry collections by Canadian women published in the preceding year, include:

* The Wrong Cat by Lorna Crozier
* Calling Down the Sky by Rosanna Deerchild
* Terra Incognita by Adebe DeRango-Adem
* The Poison Colour by Maureen Hynes
* Marry & Burn by Rachel Rose
* Trio by Sarah Tolmie


Finalists for the $1,000 Raymond Souster Award, open to members of the League of Canadian poets for collections published in the preceding year, include:

* The Wrong Cat by Lorna Crozier
* The Pemmican Eaters by Marilyn Dumont
* The Poison Colour by Maureen Hynes
* Standard Candles by Alice Major
*The Arrow of Time by Bruce Meyer
* The Thunderbird Poems by Armand Ruffo


The League of Canadian Poets have also awarded Vancouver-based spoken word poet RC Weslowki the Golden Beret Award. Created by Sheri-D Wilson, the Golden Beret Award honours spoken word artists in Canada.

Winners of the Gerald Lampert Memorial Award, Pat Lowther Memorial Award and Raymond Souster Award will be announced on June 18.


This post originally appeared on the CBC Books website: http://www.cbc.ca/books/2016/04/lorna...




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If you are a fan of poetry, we feature a new poem Monday through Friday in our Poetry Corner: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/group...

April is National Poetry Month!
http://poets.ca/npm/
Apr 04, 2016 03:03PM

40089 i agree it is a very enjoyable read, for sure.

the PBC is giving so many wonderful suggestions for additional reading. i am interested to see how participation here in our discussion goes over the course of this month, and whether people will be sidetracked by reading books walmsley mentions. there are just too many books noted in the PBC for a one month discussion, but as i mentioned earlier, it is a great longer term reading project, if anyone is so inclined.

i hope we won't lose people from our conversations, we certainly don't want to dissuade participation for the book.

there are additional spoilers i just encountered in a later chapter for The Cellist of Sarajevo. i think - given the nature of the book (the PBC) - this really was to be expected and not totally surprising. i am just wanting to make people aware, in case some are of the 'avoid spoilers at all costs' reading persuasion. usually i am in that camp myself... but, so far, all the books mentioned are ones i have read before. we'll see how i feel later on. heh!! :)
Apr 04, 2016 01:21PM

40089 quick note:

in this week's reading... be forewarned: there is a pretty big spoiler for The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society that is revealed (chapter 7; p. 82 in the edition i am reading, as linked to this discussion).

i am not sure if you all are concerned about spoilers (of the other books mentioned in the PBC, i mean) or not, given so many books will be touched on by the PBC? i haven't been too worried about it as it just felt like a given going into it, but this seemed like a bigger reveal than in book discussions they have had before this point. so i thought i would mention it.

i hope this week's reading is going well for everyone.

:)
General Chat (267 new)
Apr 04, 2016 10:32AM

40089 way to go, susan!!! woot! :)

i am so happy that the flexibility has been so appealing for so many participants. we were definitely aiming for that in creating the challenge, but i think it's surpassed out expectations. :)

i really like seeing everyone's lines &/or rows of books too. i peruse the plans periodically, but it's a lot to take in while scrolling all at once and some are easier to read than others. so it's been an extra layer of fun hearing about the bingos in this space!! :)
40089 linda, those two lines were what really caught my attention, and decided today's feature!

I’m still not sure how to conduct myself.

Does anyone?

40089 I Never Needed Things


I never loved a shiny car, longed for
holidays in the Azores, cashmere sweaters
to make life matter more. I don’t need

that great Cabernet, though Chateau Montelena
sends me back to a pond, a vineyard picnic—
the woman I’m with—she’s a different story.

I always saw my family life as a sinkhole
I tried to climb out of. But more
it was a vacuum, a grave that needed dirt

to fill it in. So stuck I was, I wanted only
to hold on to someone for the ride.
I’m still not sure how to conduct myself.

Does anyone? So many selves craving
to be seen and cared for. Once in a while
I drive to a mall to peer in shop windows,

to see what the excitement’s about.
A mother tries a dress on her daughter,
a young man chooses between TV screens.

They seem at home here. Sometimes
I think their joy is sensual: they find little gems
shimmering in the earth. I want to take home

their expressions, try them a while.

-- Ira Sadoff


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Biography


Ira Sadoff was born in Brooklyn, New York, on March 7, 1945, and is of Russian-Jewish ancestry. He earned a BA in industrial and labor relations from Cornell University in 1966 and an MFA from the University of Oregon in 1968. In 1975, he published his first collection of poetry, Settling Down: Poems .

Since then, Sadoff has published several poetry collections, most recently True Faith (2012) and Barter: POEMS (2003), which delves into his personal past, specifically concerning love and bereavement, as well as the historical and global past, referencing Beethoven, Vietnam, and the fall of communism. Other recent collections include Grazing: POEMS (1998), from which poems were awarded the American Poetry Review‘s Leonard Shestack Prize, the Pushcart Poetry Prize, and the George Bogin Memorial Prize from the Poetry Society of America; Emotional Traffic (1989); A Northern Calendar (1981), which charts the arrival and passage of the seasons; and Palm Reading in Winter (1978).

About Sadoff’s work, the poet Gerald Stern has said, “Nowhere else in American poetry do I come across a passion, a cunning, and a joy greater than his. And a deadly accuracy. I see him as one of the supreme poets of his generation.” And on awarding Sadoff the Bogin Memorial Prize, the poet Alan Shapiro said, “Beyond the energetic syntax and the astonishing range of idiom and tone, what I so admire in these poems is the just yet always unpredictable weaving together of individual and collective life, the insightful, almost seamless integration of personal experience in all its unredemptive anguish with the heterogeneous realities of American culture.”

Sadoff is also the author of three works of prose, most recently History Matters: Contemporary Poetry on the Margins of American Culture (2009), which, through the work of poets like Czesław Miłosz and Frank O'Hara, argues that poets live and write within history; An IRA Sadoff Reader: Selected Poetry and Prose (1992), a collection of stories, poems, and essays about contemporary poetry; and Uncoupling (1982), a novel.

He is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. In 1973, he was a fellow at the Squaw Valley Community of Writers, and in 1974, he was the Alan Collins Fellow in Poetry and Prose at the Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference. His poetry has been widely anthologized, most recently in The Best American Poetry 2008 Series, in 2008.

Sadoff has served as poetry editor of the Antioch Review, and was cofounder of the Seneca Review. He has taught at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and in the MFA programs of the University of Virginia and Warren Wilson College.

He currently serves as the Arthur Jeremiah Roberts Professor of English at Colby College in Waterville, Maine.



**********


Sources


author's website: https://irasadoff.wordpress.com

poem from: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/201...
biography from: https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/i...
General Chat (267 new)
Apr 03, 2016 01:29PM

40089 wheeeeee!! way to go, allison!! love your column of book choices and all their connections! :)
Apr 03, 2016 11:53AM

40089 no worries -- i started it with the initial mention! haha. just don't want to go too far off the path. :)
Apr 03, 2016 11:42AM

40089 it would be great to visit s.f.! my cousin is there right now. and, of course city lights bookstore!!

(sorry for the tangent... back to our regularly scheduled programming! heh!!)
Apr 03, 2016 11:24AM

40089 @ natasha - my father went on the tour many years ago, so it's just been in my mind for so long. :)
Apr 03, 2016 09:13AM

40089 thank you, penny & mary anne, for your great responses to the questions!

@ penny -- how cool your book might be of interest to your colleague and his volunteer work!

@ mary anne -- re: the 'hoist' question, thank you for stating so well what i was struggling with putting into words: "This demonstrates the prevailing social view that poverty causes crime. If most prisoners are from poor underprivileged backgrounds then that says more about our society not providing support to such families" i was really struggling with carol coming across as believing crime, or incarcerated people, are unique to low income environments. in my own interests and readings, another area of interest and concern for me concerning our prison systems is the inequality of representation by race, with aboriginal (in canada) and black populations disproportionately present in prisons. there are some very deep systemic issues that need serious work. i am curious whether ann goes there in this book.

and i agree with navi - 'station eleven' is a great suggestion!

@ penny -- i didn't know they did tours in kingston! i know the prison tour is a popular attraction in san francisco, at alcatraz. and i would be curious to see that, but it's not a functioning prison at this point.
40089 i am glad this one interested you, Emmkay! i was also able to relate to the place, which added to the reading for me.
Apr 03, 2016 05:19AM

40089 Week Two

Welcome to the second bit of our reading! That was a quick 2 days for the first couple of chapters - but we would still love to hear your thoughts, as soon as you are able to comment!

Here's what's on the schedule for this week:

Week Two: April 3rd - 9th - Chapters 3 through 7; pages 28 - 92

-- books mentioned:
The Boy in the Moon: A Father's Search for His Disabled Son;
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time;
The Book of Negroes;
Such a Long Journey;
The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society



Please continue to remain sensitive to spoilers from beyond the point of our scheduled reading for this week, so as to not ruin things for other readers. Thank you. :)
Apr 02, 2016 03:20PM

40089 thank you for your responses to the questions, navi and natasha! :)
and welcome to your first goodreads group book discussion, navi. how awesome!!

i find it interesting that all three of us noted that statement from carol about 'hoisting to the middle class'. i am curious - had you noticed this on your own, prior to my question about it?

@ navi -- i agree - memoirs can be hit or miss for me as well. though i find when they are anchored in a topic apart from the author, like the PBC in walmsley's book, i have more success with them. and they can also be a tricky genre for a group discussion.
Apr 02, 2016 10:09AM

40089 alrighty, then -- i will give a go with the posted questions :)


1. When you first heard about this book, what was your initial impression? What was it about this book that caught your attention and made you want to read it as part of our monthly group reads, over the other books in the poll?

i actually didn't vote in the poll, but i was leaning more towards kathleen winter's book, Boundless: Tracing Land and Dream in a New Northwest Passage. heh!

but i added the prison book club to the poll because i thought it offered two interesting ideas for discussion: 1) the prison communities and these men and their reading, and 2) getting a glimpse at the workings of an in-person book club.

so i hope the book does give us lots to talk about this month! :)



2. Ann survived a very scary and traumatic event. One of the men who attacked her was caught, tried, found guilty, and sentenced to prison time. Do you think Ann would have been as curious about the idea of helping Carol with the PBC if she had not had this experience?

i have no idea.


3. It took a lot of strength and courage for Ann to commit to the PBC program. Are her actions and situations relatable to you? (Without getting too personal, we don't want anyone to feel uncomfortable or put on the spot!!) Would you be open to helping in a PBC, if the opportunity presented itself to you?

it is relatable to me. with my own personality, and if i were in ann's place, i can see it being a way to conquer this fear she has from the attack she survived. it would be so hard, but i can imagine it would also be helpful. i hope it will be fore ann, and for the men in the clubs. i also have the 'curiosity' gene, so i would be open to helping in this kind of way if an opportunity presented.



4. What do you think about Carol's statement that, in creating the PBC program she: “hoped to hoist them into the middle class by reading.”? (p. 25)

i had a bit of trouble with this comment, actually, and found it really stood out to me. i would love to know carol's intent in this statement and perhaps it will be revealed as were read further on. the comment also had me thinking about altruism (a topic i am quite interested in anyway).



5. Do you think most people carry preconceived notions about prisoners and the prison system? Or even spend much time thinking about this part of our society?

i do think if you ask people, there are preconceived notions or beliefs that are held - whether about people who are incarcerated, or about the system itself. (and i hope this discussion won't get sidetracked by political opinions as i don't think that is the point of the book - at least not so far. political discussions online can sometimes go sideways quickly.) i don't know if people spend a lot of time thinking about this part of our society or not? i have done some reading on the subject, and find it interesting, sad, and in need of help.



6. What do you think of the PBC selections, so far? If you were to recommend one book at this point, which one would you choose for the group? Why?

i think they are interesting, and i love how engaged the men get in their discussions and opinions of the books.

i don't know about you all, but as i am reading i keep thinking, 'what would i suggest? what would they like??' haha!! i feel like it's a perfectly reasonable response for a bookish person. :)

a few books that have popped into my mind as possibly working well for the group: Indian Horse, Sweetland, and The Mountain Story.
Apr 02, 2016 07:37AM

40089 Week 1 - Summary

Week One: April 1st & 2nd - Chapters 1 through 2; pages 1 - 27

-- book mentioned:
Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace ... One School at a Time

Chapter One

• A overview of the 2 prison book club members, and prison staff are offered
• We learn about how Ann came to consider helping the Prison Book Club (PBC), through an invitation from her friend Carol Finlay, to shape their reading list - something Ann agreed to right away (helping select books)
• Books they had already read included: Angela's Ashes, The Road, Three Day Road, and Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance
• Ann writes about the mugging/attack she survived while living in England in 2002 and the injuries and post-traumatic stress she endured for years afterwards
• Ann was very concerned that stepping into a prison would trigger her fears
• At the time of Carol’s invitation for the PBC, Ann notes she was in a bit of a rut - she had lost her full-time job, was back to freelancing, while caring for her mother who was living with Alzheimer’s.
• Ann felt like more of a caretaker than a writer at this time


Chapter Two

• Ann and Carol had only been friends for about a year at this point, but Ann & her husband enjoyed the company of Carol and her husband, Bryan and had been invited to their cottage on Amherst Island, near Kingston
• Ann notes Carol had an entrepreneurial drive and a sense of a calling to help others, through her DNA, and she often chose books for helping others
• October 2010, Ann arrives at Collins Bay prison for the first time - and says she was ‘fearful to the point of shock’, and recalls only brief impressions from that first visit, after clearing security.
• At this first meeting, Carol leads the men through a discussion of Dave Eggers' Zeitoun
• One inmate approached Ann and asked “Miss, why would a nice person like you want to spend time with bad guys like us?” Ann replied she wanted to help them find good books to read.
• Ann feels she didn’t learn anything to help her in choosing books, because she had been so scared
• Before ever meeting any of the men and attending the first session, Ann had considered a few titles for the group: Alias Grace, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight, and The Woman Who Walked Into Doors
• “Curiosity of the unknown is so often paired with fear of the unknown.” (p. 16)
• Ann returns to the prison in March, 2011. A new facilitator was helping Carol, Derek - Carol’s neighbour, and a former CBC radio man, who hosted a classical music program. Of the Mennonite faith, their social justice causes included prison visits.
• The book being discussed at this meeting is Three Cups of Tea.
• The men were very engaged in the book and discussing it deeply, with interesting insights. Carol encouraged the men well with great prompts.
• Graham felt things just didn’t add up/make sense in the book - a rather perceptive reading.
• At the April, 2011 follow-up meeting, news of Mortenson’s exaggerations and fabrications had come to light so were talked about in the group. The men seemed more forgiving, as Mortenson was under attack.
• On the drive home from the March meeting, Carol tells Ann how she came to start the PBC.
• Carol stated she “hoped to hoist them into the middle class by reading.” (p. 25)
• Carol and previously been an English teacher, then an Anglican priest in the 1990s
• Initially Carol met with the prison Chaplain, Blair, and the early members were from his Roman Catholic spirituality group.
• Carol ran PBC programs in other prisons too, including Grand Valley - a federal women’s prison.



Discussion Questions

-- please refrain from revealing spoilers, if you have read further along in the book. thank you.


1. When you first heard about this book, what was your initial impression? What was it about this book that caught your attention and made you want to read it as part of our monthly group reads, over the other books in the poll?

2. Ann survived a very scary and traumatic event. One of the men who attacked her was caught, tried, found guilty, and sentenced to prison time. Do you think Ann would have been as curious about the idea of helping Carol with the PBC if she had not had this experience?

3. It took a lot of strength and courage for Ann to commit to the PBC program. Are her actions and situations relatable to you? (Without getting too personal, we don't want anyone to feel uncomfortable or put on the spot!!) Would you be open to helping in a PBC, if the opportunity presented itself to you?

4. What do you think about Carol's statement that, in creating the PBC program she: “hoped to hoist them into the middle class by reading.”? (p. 25)

5. Do you think most people carry preconceived notions about prisoners and the prison system? Or even spend much time thinking about this part of our society?

6. What do you think of the PBC selections, so far? If you were to recommend one book at this point, which one would you choose for the group? Why?


-- As always, these discussion questions are offered as prompts to help encourage discussion. But you should not feel limited or restricted in any way. Please feel free to offer your own questions or thoughts you would like to discuss with us!! The more active your input, the more engaging the discussion will be for all participants. :)

-- page numbers reference the same edition linked to this thread: The Prison Book Club
Apr 01, 2016 12:46PM

40089 @ jenn -- oh!! pretty - that's the one in my illustration!! ;)
Apr 01, 2016 12:35PM

40089 @ susan -- i'll link that for you: Louis Riel and Gabriel Dumont: A Penguin Lives Biography. have't read it, but i did know about the series because i want to read a few of the other books in the series!! :) (emily carr, mordecai richler, nellie mcclung, glenn gould, l.m. montgomery. t's a great cast of authors writing on these other prominent canadians. good job, penguin!! haha! https://www.goodreads.com/series/1147...)
Apr 01, 2016 12:27PM

40089 Jen wrote: "I have a beautiful edition of East of Eden on my bookshelf - yay! It's funny, for some reason I am very slow to read the 'big' writers, but then when I do I wonder why one earth I waited. Same thing happened to me last year with Toni Morrison, when I finally read Beloved. "

do you have the edition you linked? that is the same one i have and i love it! :) i often feel like some of my 'glaring gaps' have gone on too long.


topics created by Jennifer