M.R. Jenks M.R.'s Comments (member since May 02, 2012)


M.R.'s comments from the Stephen King Fans group.

(showing 1-16 of 16)

Jan 31, 2013 07:03PM

203 I think he is someone who is keenly observant. He listens to how people speak, their gestures, why they act the way they do. I think HE wants to know what makes THEM tick. What drives them? What makes them the way they are?
Oct 25, 2012 05:40AM

203 Thanks, Esse. I'll give it a shot.
Oct 23, 2012 07:32AM

203 I guess I would give the The Twelve a shot simply because I like Cronin's writing and I've been thinking of picking up The Passage again and trying to finish it. My problem with The Passage the first time was that I became so involved in this story of one man's escape and all the terror surrounding this "bug" and what it turned people into, that I was absolutely dumbfounded and shell shocked when the novel just cut away to this distant future time and away from the characters I had come to care about. I put the book down and haven't picked it up since. Well, now I feel I should have given the book more of a chance, and am thinking of tackling it again. Is it worth it? Does it get better?
Jun 11, 2012 09:21AM

203 I think part of the issue for those of us who loved 11/22/63 is that we loved it so much we simply can't fathom what someone who otherwise loves Stephen King's writing would have a problem with. I thought it must be because the subject matter is not horror, but you know what? It doesn't matter. Different strokes for different folks (couldn't think of a better chiche) . . .
Introduce yourself (3781 new)
May 29, 2012 10:13AM

203 Hi E.C.,

If you like those, you'll love 11/22/63 as well. Cheers!
May 21, 2012 12:02PM

203 Just a note that I like some of the connections (both direct and indirect) that he makes between his books. I loved in 11/22/63 how Jake comes across Beverly March and Richie Tozier when he is living in Derry temporarily. Made me want to go back and read "It" again (one of my absolute favorites).
May 17, 2012 06:05PM

203 Terri, the book I think most captures the 50's - early 60's is It. It is my second or third favorite; the movie doesn't do it justice. It really puts you back there, and you feel like you know the town of Derry intimately.
May 17, 2012 06:02PM

203 Except for Cell, of course. I don't know what he was thinking there.
May 17, 2012 12:03PM

203 M.R. Jenks (mjenks6) | 7 comments As an author who is just starting out, I like to study Stephen King's writing and see what makes it tick. I suppose one has to pick different phases of his career as well, because his writing varied greatly from one phase to another. But I'm curious to hear from all of you, what is it that you think makes King's writing tick? What is it that draws you to his books and makes you want to keep reading? I really don't have a solid answer yet, except that in his best stuff (most of which is older) you literally find yourself stepping into the head (and skin) of his characters. You don't just empathize with them; you become them. What do you think?
Introduce yourself (3781 new)
May 17, 2012 11:33AM

203 As an author who is just starting out, I like to study Stephen King's writing and see what makes it tick. I suppose one has to pick different phases of his career as well, because his writing varied greatly from one phase to another. But I'm curious to hear from all of you, what is it that you think makes King's writing tick? What is it that draws you to his books and makes you want to keep reading? I really don't have a solid answer yet, except that in his best stuff (most of which is older) you literally find yourself stepping into the head (and skin) of his characters. You don't just empathize with them; you become them. What do you think?
May 10, 2012 12:35PM

203 Yeah, inserting politics can be a killer, all right. My disagreement with King regarding 11/22/63 had more to do with the assassination itself (I've seen every document or documentary there is on the subject and to me it's evident there's more to the picture than meets the eye), but that I can get around. Politics, however, are more divisive than ever and you're right, Gatorman, there's no getting past that.
Introduce yourself (3781 new)
May 04, 2012 09:27AM

203 Hi fellow newbies! It's funny, I think I'm one of the only people who think 11/22/63 is King's best (not that The Shining and It aren't close seconds). The Yellow Card Man has to be one of my favorite SK characters!
May 02, 2012 07:51AM

203 Exactly. In a way, that's scarier than vampires because it's more unsettling, like the ground shifting under your feet. He also gets into some quantum theory here, where decisions beget alternate realities, realities which actually exist somewhere out there. I thought one one of the most awesome touches to the latter part of the novel was where the Sadie of an alternate reality (where she and Jake never met) sees something in Jake, like she has met him before. That is a spiritual moment with me, and makes the novel all the more romantic (could this be why some people don't like it as much? Hmmm . . .). Anyway, fascinating stuff!
May 02, 2012 06:14AM

203 I also think the ending was one of the best (and most appropriate) endings. It could have gone a few different ways but none would have been as good.
May 02, 2012 06:06AM

203 I kind of think those who didn't like 11/22/63 were disappointed by the subject matter i.e. that it wasn't more horror-oriented. However, if you take the novel on its own merits, it's an amazing novel; as a writer I think it's one of the most perfectly crafted stories I have ever read.
Introduce yourself (3781 new)
May 02, 2012 06:02AM

203 Hi Folks, My name is Matt and I've been a Stephen King fan since 1974. For some reason the only book(s) I have not read of his are The Dark Tower series, but I promise, I will! His most recent novel 11/22/63 is my favorite and, to me, one of the most perfectly crafted stories I have ever read. The only novel of his I was ever disappointed in was Cell - not by most of the book but by the ending (and I know I'm not alone).


topics created by M.R.