Jeffrey Jeffrey's Comments (member since Jan 28, 2008)


Jeffrey's comments from the SciFi and Fantasy Book Club group.

(showing 41-60 of 201)

Oct 26, 2010 06:41AM

1865 Its been a while since I read this book. Besides Mike, which in many ways was a fairly new idea of A.I, there was surrogate pregnancy, switchable robotic prosthetic arms.

On the other hand there is the hush hood, the devise to not allow others to hear what is being said.

Or the catapult to move objects back to earth.
Oct 25, 2010 06:25PM

1865 There is Asimov's Foundation Universe, which includes the Robot Books.

Bujold's Miles Vorkosigan's Universe.

There is Alan Dean Foster's Commonwealth Universe, which includes all of the FLinx books, and his other commonwealth books including Catchelot, Mission to Moulekin, etc.

CJ Cherryh also has her large Alliance-Union universe including the Nebula award winner Downbelow Station

Piers Anthony's Cluster universe.

James White's Sectior General series (medicine for aliens)

Poul Anderson's Flandry series

Marion Zimmer Bradley's Darkover series
Oct 17, 2010 06:41PM

1865 I have the Kindle but the book is free at the library and not interested enough to shell out the dough for an ebook on the kindle.

Its also because been lugging work home with me too so its a double whammy.

Anyway I put the Man of All Things on the side and started reading Intrigues by Lackey today.
Oct 17, 2010 12:07AM

1865 Its been a tough month for reading for me. Feel like treading water. Been reading Kevin Anderson's Map of All Things, but only two thirds done.

I want to read Cryoburn going to get at library and very interested in reading Towers of Midnight. Took Sanderson's new book out of library but at 1000 pages its hard to get motivated to carry the tome back and forth to work.
Jul 12, 2010 02:17PM

1865 This Alien Shore was also a very well written book. I liked this standalone a lot as well.
Jul 12, 2010 06:28AM

1865 I read the trilogy and its a great example of dark magic. Very well written.
Jun 30, 2010 08:14PM

1865 I have been to three Worldcons. One in Baltimore, One in Philadelphia and one in Boston. Loved them all. I have been to philcon in philadelphia several times, lunacon in New York and New Jersey, Boskone and Readercon. I like the conventions that are more book orientated but masquarades and seeing your favorite author and meeting other people who read a lot is a fun experience
Jun 25, 2010 12:31PM

1865 I will nominate Kop by Warren Hammond.
Jun 25, 2010 12:24PM

1865 I second Guns with Ocassional Music by Jonathan Lethem.

This is a classic Raymond Chandler sf tale with time travel thrown in..
1865 I also nominate The Imperium Game by KD Wentworth. This urban fantasy has all of the characters stuck in a computer game based on Roman Mythology, and the Pluto is plotting revenge. see http://www.fictiondb.com/author/kd-we...
1865 I nominate http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10... #1) by Mickey Zucker Reichert .

It is a very good sword and fantasy novel with God's from norse mythology
May 25, 2010 01:02PM

1865 MacAvoy's series had three books Damiano, Damiano's Lute and Raphael.

Altered Carbon is a really good book but no female protagonists.

Azure Bonds by Kate Novak and Jeff Grubb was an excellent sword fantasy. She is kind of a female knight.

Sasha by Joel Shepherd features a female warrior.

Also by Joel Shepherd is his Cassandrea Kresnow trilogy which features an artificial person. The first is the riviting Crossover.

Take a look at Privilege of the Sword by Ellen Kushner where a relation of an English lord is turned into a swordswoman.

As for Psychic powers, (a personal fav of mine)

Take a look at Andre Norton books --
May 20, 2010 12:40PM

1865 I am reading Directive 51 by John Barnes. Post apocalptic sf novels are a personal favorite. Next on the agenda is Desert Spear.
How do you rate (42 new)
May 17, 2010 02:22PM

1865 Goodreads asks us to give 5 stars to books that are amazing. After a ton of reading, there are a lot less books that are amazing. How do you rate books to have 5 stars? Do you rate different genres on a higher code or standard. Does great literature automatically get a higher rating because of when it was written -- would Moby Dick be a classic if written now. Would Great Expectations. Does Catch-22 deserve 5 stars because it was a great anti war book.

Do you look at how a novel has been perceived to determine if its worth 5 stars.

Do sequels where the author gets to write in a similar world deserve less of a rating than books that are in a completely new world.

Mostly, do you judge sf or fantasy to the same standard that you would Shakespeare or Dickens.

I personally have to judge each book on its inherent nature but if it dares to tell a new story (kushiel's Dart) (Neuromancer) it has to get some pluses just for that.
May 15, 2010 12:32AM

1865 I just finished Changes by Jim Butcher and The Long Man by Steve Englehart, plus I re-read The Legend of Nightfall by Reichert, which I feel is her best book.

I usually change genres but I have The Desert Spear by Peter Brett, Dream of Perpetual Motion, Under Heaven and Directive 51 out of the library and due w/i 10 days so I may just stick in fantasy and sf.
May 15, 2010 12:22AM

1865 I read this when it first came out and I thought wow, she really did a great job with an original subject matter for fantasy.
1865 Never knew that Stuart. I do not recall that my novel said that.
1865 Neuromancer is a groundbreaking book because it postulated the whole cyberpunk subgenre of sf, and put cyberpunk on the map. Frankly, Gibson coined the whole cyberspace idea, the interface of man with computers that you find in the best cyberpunk novels. Important elements were the global reach of massive corporations, the distopian vision of the future dominated by those corporations, the whole interface between humans, computers, the matrix, and internet, AI influences etc. Yet in some ways, even though it was ground breaking, its a hard story -- not to read, I had no problem finishing it but its not an easy book.

Far from "the novelization of a comic book" (whatever that means) Snow Crash was the influential for its postulating of avatars plus it was a fun read. Although corporations still ran the world, as the United States had ceded control of various areas of America to vast global corporations and the mafia, individuals could have more of a say in fighting through them. Here, in Snow Crash, Stephenson use of language never exceeded his reach. Was the novel flawed, clearly there should be issues for anyone who had to wade through those large sections of the book about some odd god (similar in some ways to the World According to Garp which contains short stories in mid book). Comparisons to his later fiction, such as Cryptocomicon, in my mind are poor because that book as well as his three book opus were historical science fiction and not, in my mind, cyberpunk at all.

Reading Snow Crash when it was first published was a blast. Its prose and ideas leapt off the page.

Snow Crash may not be as influential a book as Neuromancer, but to me and countless others who read it -- its a better. At the end of the day, that has to count as something.

And frankly, the whole cyberpunk subgenre, has now gone the way of the dinosaur, and I am happy about it mostly because I do not think it drew anyone into science fiction while fantasy was exploding all around.
Apr 27, 2010 10:37PM

1865 Kernos wrote: "I am reading David Weber's Safehold book 4: A Mighty Fortress.

It is looking like Weber may pull a Jordan on us, making an interminable series with little plot movem..."


I couldn't agree more. I found it rather boring, and it reminded me of the latter books in the Honor Harrington series where Weber spent a lot of time discussing the background and motivations of the bad guys. The discussions of science seemed to be confined to shell casings on cannon shells, as far as I can see.
1865 The "wandering jew, cursed to eternal life until the second coming for mocking jesus"

Now thats not too provocative.

Certainly he is not a Jewish concept.

He is not waiting for the Messiah -- he is waiting for Christ, which is different.

Personally I thought Miller could have used a more Catholic character such as an apostle or someone else to be this role.


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